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Rojo y negro (1942)

From early childhood, Luisa and Miguel have always been close. But several years later, as adults and being Spain at the beginning of the civil war, the two young persons give their support... See full summary »

Director:

Carlos Arévalo

Writers:

Carlos Arévalo (story), Carlos Arévalo (dialogue) | 1 more credit »
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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Conchita Montenegro ... Luisa
Ismael Merlo ... Miguel (as I. Merlo)
Rafaela Satorrés Rafaela Satorrés ... Dª María
Ana de Siria ... Sra. de Hidalgo
Emilio G. Ruiz Emilio G. Ruiz ... Julio
José Sepúlveda José Sepúlveda ... Ignacio
Luisa España Luisa España ... Luisa niña (as Luisita España)
Quique Camoiras Quique Camoiras ... Miguel niño (as Quiqui P. Camoiras)
Luis Gómez Rey Luis Gómez Rey ... Moreno
Matilde Santibáñez Matilde Santibáñez ... Joaquina
Elisa Méndez Elisa Méndez ... Madre de Miguel
Francisco Valencia Francisco Valencia ... Miliciano 3º
Secundino A. Moreno Secundino A. Moreno ... Isidoro
Blanca Suárez Blanca Suárez ... Detenida (as Blanquita Suárez)
Carmen Cabañas Carmen Cabañas ... Amiga
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Storyline

From early childhood, Luisa and Miguel have always been close. But several years later, as adults and being Spain at the beginning of the civil war, the two young persons give their support to ideologically opposing camps. The communist Miguel and Luisa the Falangist not they will agree, but the tragic events that loom over the country will make them pay a high price: she is stopped, after a house search, in a red hordes cheka and he eventually is searching her desperately. Written by jsanchez

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Genres:

Drama | War

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Details

Country:

Spain

Language:

Spanish

Release Date:

25 May 1942 (Spain) See more »

Filming Locations:

Madrid, Spain

Company Credits

Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Mono (RCA)

Aspect Ratio:

1.37 : 1
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User Reviews

 
A fascist movie forbidden by Franco
12 June 2006 | by dbotorealesSee all my reviews

Rojo y Negro are the colors (black and red) of the Falange's flag (Fascist Spanish Party). This movie was considered lost for a long time and a copy was discovered a few years ago.It was restored and screened in Filmoteca Española in Madrid. The main roles are Conchita Montenegro as Luisa, and Ismael Merlo as Miguel. 1921: Luis and Miguel are friends since childhood. At the beginning of the film, their families with other Spanish citizens attend in Madrid to a parade of Spanish troops ready to send to the colonial war in North Africa (Morocco). Miguel's father criticizes the decision of the Spanish government. The attitude of Luisa's family is different and a little Luisa affirms than the soldiers must revenge the dead. Years later, Miguel y Luisa are engaged but there are some difficulties in their relationship: They have different political views. Miguel belongs to a extreme left party and Luisa is falangista (militant of the Fascist Party). The Civil War breaks out and Madrid is surrounded by Franco's Troops. Conchita is an agent against the Republican Government. One night she is arrested at home by a militia group and caged with other political prisoners ready to be executed at dawn. Miguel is a militia member of this prison. Lately, he is doubtful about his ideals and argues with his militia mates about the convenience of the death penalty. Luisa's mother informs him about the situation of her daughter and Miguel desperately tries to avoid her execution..., finally, the end of the film represents a new dawn of the nation. Conchita Montenegro and Ismael Merlo are really splendid. Carlos Árevalo directs masterly this propaganda film. The suspense sequences, especially when the militia comes to arrest Luisa and the superb ending makes this film one of the best propaganda Spanish (and maybe European)fiction movies ever made. Two weeks after the premier the film was removed from the movie theaters due to the pressure of high members of the military hierarchy. The reason was the conciliatory tone (in my opinion very lightly) at the end of the film. 'Rojo y Negro' is, ideologically, a more fascist film than 'Raza' as well as a superior quality film. Until the end of 1942 the Spanish film industry was totally under the control of Falange. When the Germans were clearly loosing the war Franco nationalized the film industry by a decree. Of course, I don't share the political point of view of this film but I have to recognized its high cinematographic values.


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