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Road to Morocco (1942) Poster

Trivia

The scene where the camel spits in Turkey's (Bob Hope's) face wasn't planned. The camel did it of its own accord while the cameras were rolling, and Hope's recoil and Bing Crosby's reaction were so funny that it was left in the final cut of the film.
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In an interview Dorothy Lamour commented that the "boys" ad-libbed their lines so much she often didn't know when to say her lines since they didn't give her her cue.
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Although this was the third "Road" picture as noted above, it was the first original screenplay--the story line wasn't based on an existing story.
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Paramount shot two endings for the film. The one not used had Bob Hope and Bing Crosby enlisting in the Marines and ended with the line "See you on the road to Tokyo."
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Premiere voted this movie as one of "The 50 Greatest Comedies Of All Time" in 2006.
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Anthony Quinn returns as the villain. He is the only actor, apart from the three leads, to play a similar character in two separate "Road" pictures, making him a semi-regular. He first appeared as Caesar in Road to Singapore (1940).
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Orville 'Turkey' Jackson said he was born in 1913. In reality, Bob Hope was born in 1903, making him ten years older than his character at the time.
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The desert scenes were shot on location in Yuma, AZ.
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For one special-effects shot a magic ring was supposed to turn Bob Hope into a monkey. When director David Butler instructed Bing Crosby to keep perfectly still so his position wouldn't change while Hope switched places with the monkey, the singer quipped, "Don't worry, Dave. You're making a monkey out of Ski Nose, and you think I won't stand still for that? Try me, brother. I'll be a real statue."
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To capitalize on the slave auction scene, Paramount arranged to auction off dates with Hollywood bachelors at the film's premiere. Bidders pledged to buy war bonds.
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This film was selected to the National Film Registry, Library of Congress, in 1996.
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For use in this film, Paramount bought comedy routines originally written by Ralph Spence for his story "From Rags to Rhythm."
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In 1942 Decca Records issued a Bing Crosby solo version of the Johnny Burke-Jimmy Van Heusen title song. A later commercial duet by Crosby and Bob Hope would be included on a Decca boxed album which otherwise was devoted to the Burke-Van Heusen score of Road to Utopia (1945).
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Bob Hope and Bing Crosby kidded heavyset director David Butler relentlessly about his weight. For a scene in which enemy horses chased them through the streets, Butler advised them not to jump out of the street until he gave them the signal, allowing them plenty of time to get out of the way. However, as they ran the horses kept getting closer and closer with no signal to the pair from Butler. Finally, the stars panicked and jumped. When they complained about their bruises, Butler laughed at them and told them they'd ruined the shot by jumping too soon. Some crew members thought he was getting back at them, and Hope nicknamed him "The Murderer."
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To publicize the film, the studio had cards placed on water fountains in each town where it played. They read, "Thirsty for Entertainment? See what happens when Bob Hope chases Bing Crosby and Dorothy Lamour to a desert oasis on the Road to Morocco."
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The third of the seven Bob Hope, Bing Crosby and Dorothy Lamour "Road" films.
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Although as in most of the "Road" pictures Bob Hope and Bing Crosby give the impression of ad-libbing their way through the film, most of their off-the cuff quips were either in the script or written by the writers of the stars' radio shows on the set as the film was being shot.
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"Lux Radio Theater" broadcast a 60-minute radio adaptation of the movie on April 5, 1943 with Bing Crosby and Bob Hope reprising their film roles.
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Included among the American Film Institute's 1998 list of the 400 movies nominated for the Top 100 Greatest American Movies.
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One of over 700 Paramount productions, filmed between 1929-49, which were sold to MCA/Universal in 1958 for television distribution, and have been owned and controlled by Universal ever since. Considered one of the centerpieces of the collection, it received its initial telecast in Philadelphia Monday 5 January 1959, launching the MCA/Paramount film series in that city on WCAU (Channel 10) and was also telecast that same day in Los Angeles on KNXT (Channel 2) and in St. Louis on KMOX (Channel 4); its initial telecasts followed in Chicago 11 January 1959 on WBBM (Channel 2), in New York City 29 January 1959 on WCBS (Channel 2), in Minneapolis 2 March 1959 on WTCA (Channel 11), and in Pittsburgh, where it launched the MCA/Paramount Film Library, Monday 6 April 1959 on KDKA (Channel 2), followed by Asheville 8 April 1959 on WLOS (Channel 13) and Milwaukee 19 April 1959 on WITI (Channel 6). In Detroit it first aired 25 September 1959 on WJBK (Channel 2), in Johnstown 13 November 1959 on WJAC (Channel 6), and in San Francisco 14 August 1960 on KPIX (Channel 5). It was first released on DVD by Universal 17 June 1998 and again 5 March 2002 and again 4 May 2004, as part of the On the Road with Bob Hope and Bing Crosby Collection, and since that time has also been a frequent flyer on Turner Classic Movies.
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Included among the American Film Institute's 2000 list of the Top 100 Funniest American Movies.
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Goofs | Crazy Credits | Quotes | Alternate Versions | Connections | Soundtracks

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