7.1/10
5,086
50 user 34 critic

Road to Morocco (1942)

Two carefree castaways on a desert shore find an Arabian Nights city, where they compete for the luscious Princess Shalmar.

Director:

David Butler

Writers:

Frank Butler (original screenplay), Don Hartman (original screenplay)
Nominated for 2 Oscars. Another 1 win. See more awards »

Photos

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Cast

Complete credited cast:
Bing Crosby ... Jeff Peters
Bob Hope ... Orville 'Turkey' Jackson / Aunt Lucy
Dorothy Lamour ... Princess Shalmar
Anthony Quinn ... Mullay Kasim
Dona Drake ... Mihirmah
Vladimir Sokoloff ... Hyder Khan
Mikhail Rasumny ... Ahmed Fey
George Givot ... Neb Jolla
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Storyline

Jeff and Turkey, two wild and crazy guys adrift on a raft in the Mediterranean, are cast away on a desert shore and hop a convenient camel to an Arabian Nights city where Turkey soon finds himself sold as a slave...to luscious Princess Shalmar of Karameesh. Naturally, Jeff would like to rescue Turkey from this "dire" fate, even if it means taking his place! But they haven't figured on virile desert chieftain Mullay Kassim, who has designs on the princess himself... Written by Rod Crawford <puffinus@u.washington.edu>

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

You'll Shriek At These Shieks! . . . trying the double - Oh! on Sheikess Dorothy Lamour!


Certificate:

Passed | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Bob Hope and Bing Crosby kidded heavyset director David Butler relentlessly about his weight. For a scene in which enemy horses chased them through the streets, Butler advised them not to jump out of the street until he gave them the signal, allowing them plenty of time to get out of the way. However, as they ran the horses kept getting closer and closer with no signal to the pair from Butler. Finally, the stars panicked and jumped. When they complained about their bruises, Butler laughed at them and told them they'd ruined the shot by jumping too soon. Some crew members thought he was getting back at them, and Hope nicknamed him "The Murderer." See more »

Goofs

When Jeff enters the room where Orville and Princess Shalmar are watching the dancing girls, he walks down the center and then drifts slightly over to the left decorative border on the floor. In the next shot, he is well past the left border, standing near a column. See more »

Quotes

Orville 'Turkey' Jackson: Do it some more. Do it some more. Come on, bub, rub.
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Connections

Referenced in The 50 Worst Movies Ever Made (2004) See more »

Soundtracks

Moonlight Becomes You
(1942)
Written by Jimmy Van Heusen
Lyrics by Johnny Burke
Patially played during the opening credits
Performed by Bing Crosby
Reprised by Bing Crosby, Dorothy Lamour and Bob Hope in each other's voices
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User Reviews

 
Well, I'll Be A Monkey's Uncle!
18 March 2006 | by stevenlshoupSee all my reviews

Typical Hope and Crosby nonsense. More of a "big budget home movie" than anything else, but funny and enjoyable anyhow.

By the Time "Morocco" was created, the Road Pictures had been embraced and enjoyed and the formula was set in stone: An exotic locale, Dorothy Lamour, a couple of songs and go easy on the script because Bob and Bing are gonna "jab-lib" their way through it regardless. The result here is a slick and entertaining yarn about absolutely nothing. Don't let the current climate of "Islam/Arab/Terrorism" mindset disturb you about the on screen antics because this was filmed in a different era and has nothing to do with the goings on in our world today.

Bing gets a chance to croon the very lovely Moonlight Becomes You, which to this day is still one of the most touching love songs ever written; Bob gets to do his "screen persona schtick" and it is hilarious; Dorothy has a forgettable song and a funny reprise of Moonlight Becomes You, sung in the desert accompanied by the boys and it is extremely funny. Anthony Quinn (who was a Road Picture Regular) returns in a typical villain role in which he does his best.

A couple of notes. Early in the picture Bob and Bing get involved with a camel who licks them. At the end of this routine as they prepare to ride away on the beast it spits at Bob. This was NOT in the script. The camel ad-libbed and the reactions of both Hope and Crosby are genuine. The director liked the take so much he used it in the final cut. Secondly, it took forever for the boys to sing the theme song, The Road to Morocco. It seems that every time they got to the lyric " . . . like Webster's Dictionary we're Morocco bound. . . " they'd break up over that lyric and would have to re-shoot the song.

It's a breezy, light-weight, fun evening with Der Bingle and Old Slope Nose. Make yourself a bowl of popcorn, grab a large soda and laugh away for 82 minutes. It'll do you good!


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Frequently Asked Questions

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Details

Country:

USA

Language:

English

Release Date:

8 April 1943 (Mexico) See more »

Also Known As:

Road to Morocco See more »

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Box Office

Gross USA:

$1,626,400
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

Production Co:

Paramount Pictures See more »
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Technical Specs

Runtime:

(DVD) | (copyright length)

Sound Mix:

Mono (Western Electric Mirrophonic Recording)

Aspect Ratio:

1.37 : 1
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