When the Spanish Republic is declared in 1931, three brothers go separate ways. One, a priest, is killed by leftists. One, a member of the government, betrays his family's traditional ... See full synopsis »

Director:

(as J.L. Sáenz de Heredia)

Writers:

(story) (as Jaime de Andrade), (screenplay) (as J.L. Sáenz de Heredia) | 2 more credits »
Reviews
1 win & 1 nomination. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
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José Churruca
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Marisol Mendoza
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Pedro Churruca
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Isabel Churruca
Rosina Mendía ...
Isabel Acuña de Churruca
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National Spy
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Pedro Churruca's Father (as Julio Rey)
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Jaime Churruca
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Luis Echevarría
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Señor Echevarría
Mercedes Llofríu ...
Isabel Churruca, niña (as Merceditas Llofriú)
Eduardo González ...
Child
Consuelo Loygorri ...
Luis' Daughter (as Consuelito Loygorri)
Ángel Martínez ...
Pedro Churruca, niño
Francisco Camoiras ...
José Churruca, niño (as Paquito Camoiras)
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Storyline

When the Spanish Republic is declared in 1931, three brothers go separate ways. One, a priest, is killed by leftists. One, a member of the government, betrays his family's traditional ideals. The third fights on the side of Franco to defend them.

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Details

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Release Date:

10 November 1942 (Portugal)  »

Also Known As:

Blutzeugen  »

Filming Locations:

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Technical Specs

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Aspect Ratio:

1.37 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

The film was re-release in July 3 1950 with a new title, "Espíritu de una raza", and six minutes less of footage. Since Spain was by then an US ally, Franco's censors decided to cut all the scenes containing fascist salutes and add some dialogues to underline the anti-communist sense of the movie, instead of its former totalitarian spirit. See more »

Connections

Edited into Raza, el espíritu de Franco (1977) See more »

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User Reviews

 
A straight-face parody of Franco's war.
20 May 2011 | by See all my reviews

For years I wanted to take a look at this movie, curious by all the mythology that has been built around it. I have laughed a lot with certain reviewer who compares this monumental and infantile piece of trash to Triumph of the Will, as if giving himself some credit as a movie-cultured buff. I have seen Riefenstahl's film two or three times, and I admire her unquestionable talent as a filmmaker. In fact, Olympiad is one of my favourite films for its visual beauty and choreographic editing.

Now, about this jewel here... The story is so laughable that not even the illustrious screenwriter Mr Franco -I wonder why he used a phony name in the credits: was he afraid of his own censors perhaps?- would ever believe it. It is curious to see Alfredo Mayo -one of the best Spanish supporting actors of all time- wasting his talents in this filth. But since he made another two Franco propaganda films around that time, I guess he was an acolyte. Fortunately, a few decades later he would work with Carlos Saura, leaving at least a few good, respectable films behind him to be remembered for.


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