6.5/10
271
20 user 7 critic

Quiet Please: Murder (1942)

Approved | | Crime, Drama, Film-Noir | 19 March 1943 (USA)
Book thief/forger sells a fake book to a Nazi through a female agent. A detective tries to uncover who the forger is and gets in the middle of a three way struggle for rare books and revenge in a public library.

Director:

John Francis Larkin (as John Larkin)

Writers:

John Francis Larkin (screenplay) (as John Larkin), Lawrence G. Blochman (story "Death From the Sanskrit")
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Cast

Complete credited cast:
George Sanders ... Jim Fleg
Gail Patrick ... Myra Blandy
Richard Denning ... Hal McByrne
Lynne Roberts ... Kay Ryan
Sidney Blackmer ... Martin Cleaver
Kurt Katch ... Eric Pahsen
Margaret Brayton Margaret Brayton ... Miss Oval
Charles Tannen ... Hollis
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Storyline

Jim Fleg (George Sanders), a ruthless, egotistical criminal, steals a priceless Shakespeare folio from the public library, killing a guard during the crime. With his partner, Myra Blandy (Gail Patrick), Fleg forges and sells copies of the folio to unscrupulous collectors. Hal McByrne (Richard Denning), a tough, unrelenting detective traces several of the forgeries back to Myra. She and Fled plot to eliminate McBryne at the scene of the original crime---the public library. In the meantime, a buyer of one of the forgeries is demanding his money back--or else---and trails Myra and Fleg to the library. Written by Les Adams <longhorn1939@suddenlink.net>

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

YOU'VE GOT A DATE WITH DANGER!... A Rendezvous with Romance! See more »


Certificate:

Approved | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

This is the first 'rocket men' movie/serial. See more »

Goofs

In the opening scenes, a "silenced" pistol is fired making very little noise. But the pistol is a revolver, and silencers work only on semi-automatic pistols. See more »

Connections

Referenced in American Me (1992) See more »

User Reviews

 
An absolute gem
2 November 2010 | by context-consultSee all my reviews

Another reviewer suggested a better, more realistic ending (but one that would've been acceptable in 1942, when good had to triumph over evil at the movies). So I can see how some might prefer a more postmodern version.

But I think the clichés of this film are good campy fun. It's been a very long time since I found a movie this good that I've never seen before. So I see it as a superb relic to be treasured.

It's a charming film noir crime caper, stagy and clumsy at times, but with a very smooth George Sanders as the rather mild villain, and surprisingly smart banter throughout. It has a good formulaic story that doggedly ties up all loose ends into a neat package. It moves very quickly for its age, and is pretty easy to follow, despite the plot being somewhat complex.

I'm very excited to have stumbled across it.


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Details

Country:

USA

Language:

English

Release Date:

19 March 1943 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

Death from the Sanskrit See more »

Company Credits

Production Co:

Twentieth Century Fox See more »
Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Mono (Western Electric Recording)

Aspect Ratio:

1.37 : 1
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