A British family struggles to survive the first months of World War II.

Director:

William Wyler

Writers:

Arthur Wimperis (screenplay), George Froeschel (screenplay) | 3 more credits »
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Won 6 Oscars. Another 4 wins & 7 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Greer Garson ... Mrs. Miniver
Walter Pidgeon ... Clem Miniver
Teresa Wright ... Carol Beldon
May Whitty ... Lady Beldon (as Dame May Whitty)
Reginald Owen ... Foley
Henry Travers ... Mr. Ballard
Richard Ney ... Vin Miniver
Henry Wilcoxon ... Vicar
Christopher Severn Christopher Severn ... Toby Miniver
Brenda Forbes ... Gladys (Housemaid)
Clare Sandars Clare Sandars ... Judy Miniver
Marie De Becker Marie De Becker ... Ada
Helmut Dantine ... German Flyer
John Abbott ... Fred
Connie Leon Connie Leon ... Simpson
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Storyline

The Minivers, an English "middle-class" family experience life in the first months of World War II. While dodging bombs, the Minivers' son courts Lady Beldon's granddaughter. A rose is named after Mrs. Miniver and entered in the competition against Lady Beldon's rose. Written by Michael Rice <TheMikeRic@aol.com>

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

In Her Arms . . . He Felt A Quiet Peace No Terror Could Disturb See more »

Genres:

Drama | Romance | War

Certificate:

Not Rated | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Included among the "1001 Movies You Must See Before You Die", edited by Steven Schneider. See more »

Goofs

In the first church service scene, a woman who is in front of the Miniver family begins sobbing with her face buried in her hands. In the next scene from a greater distance, the woman is standing and no longer crying. See more »

Quotes

Mr. Ballard: What goes to make a rose, ma'am, is breeding... and budding... and horse manure, if you'll pardon the expression. And that's where you come in, ma'am.
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Crazy Credits

Opening credits prologue: This story of an average English middle-class family begins with the summer of 1939; when the sun shone down on a happy, careless people, who worked and played, reared their children and tended their gardens in that happy, easy-going England that was so soon to be fighting desperately for her way of life and for life itself. See more »

Connections

Referenced in Sean Bradley Reviews: Dunkirk (2017) See more »

Soundtracks

Midsummer's Day
(uncredited)
Written by Gene Lockhart
Played and Sung by the local glee club at the flower show
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User Reviews

 
Tear jerking excellence
17 January 2000 | by CalystaSee all my reviews

At the time it was a sensation and one of great influence, which obviously hit home with many American families, with the reality of the War still of course very much alive. The ending is not the expected happy one, but is instead rather thought provoking, stirring and influential. Reality, or part reality is after all always better than the typical MGM musical. Today it is not possible for it to retain the power it held during the period, but one of the reasons it is still a good movie because it is great wholesome family entertainment.

The Minivers are a family with great fortune who are well over the average income earning line to be considered just a middle class family. This is obvious with the picturesque house designed by Mr Miniver the architect. Some of the scenes have now become more noticeably studio bound now, which was something I did not notice before because it was one of the first old classic movies I did watched, but it hardly matters, as it still remains one of my favourite movies.

Greer Garson, in another of her charming English rose roles, gives a superb performance, as the devoted and loving wife. Walter Pidgeon is also great in his role, the second of his teamings with Garson. The great supporting cast includes Teresa Wright, Dame May Whitty, Richard Ney, Reginald Owen and Henry Travers. Henry Travers' as Mr Ballard, station master and a keen rose grower is in particular a memorable performer.

Elements of the film have been well combined with drama, romance, light humour, and finally, tragedy. It may have been given the Hollywood and typical glossy MGM treatment, but it hasn't forgotten either humanity or the sacrifices associated with war time problems.

Showered with accolades and awards at the time, the movie won Oscars for Greer Garson, Teresa Wright, screenplay, William Wyler and Best Picture of 1942. Walter Pidgeon lost to the dynamic performance of James Cagney in "Yankee Doodle Dandy". Henry Travers, and Dame May Whitty also netted nominations.

An agreeable screenplay and the direction of veteran William Wyler make this a forgotten treat. Few films have been as effective as this, and although its message may not ring as clear now as it did then, it has to be saluted for the war time morale it brought to movie goers around the world.

Rating: 10/10


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Frequently Asked Questions

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Details

Country:

USA

Language:

English | German

Release Date:

1 December 1942 (Sweden) See more »

Also Known As:

Mrs. Miniver See more »

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Box Office

Budget:

$1,344,000 (estimated)
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Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Mono (Western Electric Sound System)

Aspect Ratio:

1.37 : 1
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