6.9/10
48
3 user

Let the People Sing (1942)

A Czech political exile and a washed-up music hall comedian form an unlikely partnership to try and save a town's concert hall from the planners, businessmen, and bureaucrats.

Director:

John Baxter

Writers:

John Baxter, Barbara K. Emary (as Barbara K. Emery) | 2 more credits »
Reviews

Photos

Add Image Add an image

Do you have any images for this title?

Edit

Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Alastair Sim ... Prof. Ernst Kronak
Fred Emney ... Sir George Denberry-Baxter
Edward Rigby ... Timmy Tiverton
Oliver Wakefield ... Sir Reginald Foxfield
Patricia Roc ... Hope Ollerton
Annie Esmond Annie Esmond ... Lady Foxfield
Marian Spencer Marian Spencer ... Lady Shepshod
Olive Sloane ... Daisy Barley
Maire O'Neill ... Mrs. Mitterley
Gus McNaughton ... Ketley
Charles Hawtrey ... Young Orton
Peter Gawthorne Peter Gawthorne ... Maj. Shiptonthorpe
Aubrey Mallalieu ... Cmdr. Spofforth
G.H. Mulcaster G.H. Mulcaster ... Inspector
Wally Patch Wally Patch ... Sam
Edit

Storyline

A Czech political exile and a washed-up music hall comedian form an unlikely partnership to try and save a town's concert hall from the planners, businessmen, and bureaucrats.

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Plot Keywords:

based on novel | See All (1) »

Genres:

Comedy

Edit

Did You Know?

Trivia

Credited theatrical movie debut of Sir Peter Ustinov (Dr. Bentika). See more »

Quotes

Professor Ernst Kronak: It seems the only place in the world I'm entitled to be in is a concentration camp.
See more »

Soundtracks

Roly Poly
Music by Kennedy Russell
Lyrics by Desmond O'Connor
See more »

User Reviews

 
Mixed Adaptation Of Priestley Novel
16 September 2020 | by bobliptonSee all my reviews

Emigree Czech Alastair Sim and fading music hall comicEdward Rigby are on the run through a misunderstanding, and wind up in an English town where a music hall is a fading tradition, its theater the prize between two groups, one who want to use it for a plastics concern, and the other who want to turn it into a museum. What place has music in such a philistine world?

This adaptation of the J.B. Priestley novel has about 80% of its satire thrown out, and the plot doesn't even begin until the movie is halfway over, because the first half is pleasantly taken up with music and a terrific comic performance by Fred Emney as the local avatar of the Empire: drunk and amiable at night, starched and frightening by morning and, in his own words, "wrong all over the world." Like many a comedy, it's at its best while just being silly and paying as little attention to the plot as possible.


0 of 0 people found this review helpful.  Was this review helpful to you? | Report this
Review this title | See all 3 user reviews »

Frequently Asked Questions

This FAQ is empty. Add the first question.
Edit

Details

Country:

UK

Language:

English

Release Date:

10 August 1942 (UK) See more »

Company Credits

Production Co:

British National Films See more »
Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Mono

Aspect Ratio:

1.37 : 1
See full technical specs »

Contribute to This Page



Recently Viewed