7.5/10
11,567
120 user 36 critic

Holiday Inn (1942)

Passed | | Comedy, Drama, Music | 4 September 1942 (USA)
At an inn which is only open on holidays, a crooner and a hoofer vie for the affections of a beautiful up-and-coming performer.

Director:

Mark Sandrich

Writers:

Claude Binyon (screenplay), Elmer Rice (adaptation) | 1 more credit »
Reviews

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Won 1 Oscar. Another 2 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Complete credited cast:
Bing Crosby ... Jim Hardy
Fred Astaire ... Ted Hanover
Marjorie Reynolds ... Linda Mason
Virginia Dale ... Lila Dixon
Walter Abel ... Danny Reed
Louise Beavers ... Mamie
Irving Bacon ... Gus
Marek Windheim Marek Windheim ... François
James Bell ... Dunbar
John Gallaudet ... Parker
Shelby Bacon Shelby Bacon ... Vanderbilt
Joan Arnold Joan Arnold ... Daphne
Bob Crosby Orchestra Bob Crosby Orchestra ... Orchestra (as Bob Crosby's Band)
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Storyline

Lovely Linda Mason has crooner Jim Hardy head over heels, but suave stepper Ted Hanover wants her for his new dance partner after femme fatale Lila Dixon gives him the brush. Jim's supper club, Holiday Inn, is the setting for the chase by Hanover and manager Danny Reed. The music's the thing. Written by Steve Fenwick <scf@w0x0f.com>

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Genres:

Comedy | Drama | Music | Romance

Certificate:

Passed | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Details

Country:

USA

Language:

English

Release Date:

4 September 1942 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

Irving Berlin's Holiday Inn See more »

Filming Locations:

Monte Rio, California, USA See more »

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Box Office

Budget:

$3,200,000 (estimated)
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

Production Co:

Paramount Pictures See more »
Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Mono (Western Electric Mirrophonic Recording)

Aspect Ratio:

1.37 : 1
See full technical specs »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

When Irving Berlin won an Oscar for his song "White Christmas" from this movie, he became the first artist to present himself with an Academy Award. See more »

Goofs

Linda loses her hat in the pond when she is with Gus. Although she isn't seen finding the hat, she has it on when she and Lila are driving. See more »

Quotes

[talking about peach preserves]
Ted Hanover: Oh boy, do I go for those! Why they're great on... on...
[pause]
Ted Hanover: ... or even plain!
See more »

Crazy Credits

Opening credits prologue: DECEMBER 24 Christmas Eve See more »

Alternate Versions

The musical number "Abraham", performed by Bing Crosby, Marjorie Reynolds and the chorus, is sometimes cut from TV prints due to the use of blackface. Always included in telecasts of the film from the late 1950's through the early 1980's, it has been cut from Disney Channel telecasts of the film as well as showings on American Movie Classics after they began adding commercials to their films and editing potentially offensive sequences out. When AMC first started, it showed the film complete. See more »

Connections

Featured in Man in the Chair (2007) See more »

Soundtracks

Song of Freedom
(1942) (uncredited)
Music and Lyrics by Irving Berlin
Played by the Bob Crosby Orchestra
Sung at the Holiday Inn by Bing Crosby on the 4th of July
See more »

Frequently Asked Questions

See more »

User Reviews

Happy Holidays...Start with this movie.
6 December 2002 | by AbeStreetSee all my reviews

This film is good in so many ways. The song and dance numbers were all great. Teaming Bing Crosby and Fred Astaire was a great idea. These two played off each other so well that I can't imagine two other actors doing so well. Even Crosby and Hope wouldn't have done as well here. Marjorie Reynolds was a treat to look at but also had good chemistry with both Crosby and Astaire. The support cast was equally as good, Walter Abel as Danny Reed, Virginia Dale as Lila Dixon and Louise Beavers as Mamie gave solid performances.

The set was also beautiful. Obviously the Hollywood set of Holiday Inn at the end of the film that was supposed to be a reproduction of the real Holiday Inn in Connecticut is the same set used for both scenes. However it is such a realistic set that the viewer never suspects that the Connecticut scenes were filmed indoors. I think the fact that the film was in black and white helps in that respect. A color film may have actually looked more phoney.

The story is a simple one but well put together. I think many viewers can relate to guys trying to steal girls from one another, its a common enough practice today. The ending is a bit fairy tale like but then that is why so many probably like it. We get enough "reality" in our every day lives. It is nice to escape reality with a film like this.

Lastly, the black face scene during the Lincoln Day performance is offensive but it does not ruin the film. Of course a minstrel show today using black face would be unacceptable in today's environment but you can't hold a 1940's film to the same standards. I know some would like to have that scene removed from the film but I disagree. I am of African American decent and while I could view this film as a disgrace I accept it for what it is. Rather than try and obliterate scenes such as this from our film history I think they should be viewed as stepping stones to where African Americans are in film today. There may still be barriers that need to be broken through in the film world but considering where African Americans started we as a society should also take time to appreciate the accomplishments that have been achieved. Black face is out. Demeaning "yesum" roles are for the most part gone and now leading roles that portray African Americans in well to do positions in society are becoming more and more frequent. So while some of the film history regarding African Americans portrays them in a negative manner it is because of those actors and actresses were able to work in those roles and under those conditions that the modern day African American actors and actresses are able be seen in a more positive light. Ignoring the past roles ignores the actors and actresses that struggled through those times.


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