7.6/10
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58 user 27 critic

Gentleman Jim (1942)

Approved | | Biography, Drama, Romance | 14 November 1942 (USA)
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1:44 | Trailer
As bareknuckled boxing enters the modern era, brash extrovert Jim Corbett uses new rules and dazzlingly innovative footwork to rise to the top of the top of the boxing world.

Director:

Raoul Walsh

Writers:

Vincent Lawrence (screen play), Horace McCoy (screen play) | 1 more credit »
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Cast

Complete credited cast:
Errol Flynn ... James J. Corbett
Alexis Smith ... Victoria Ware
Jack Carson ... Walter Lowrie
Alan Hale ... Pat Corbett
John Loder ... Carlton De Witt
William Frawley ... Billy Delaney
Minor Watson ... Buck Ware
Ward Bond ... John L. Sullivan
Madeleine Lebeau ... Anna Held (as Madeleine LeBeau)
Rhys Williams ... Harry Watson
Arthur Shields ... Father Burke
Dorothy Vaughan ... Ma Corbett
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Storyline

Because boxing is a considered an illegal and disreputable enterprise in 1880's San Francisco, wealthy and influential members of the prestigious Olympic Club vow to make the sport a "gentlemanly" one. They sponsor a brash, extroverted young bank clerk named Jim Corbett, who quickly becomes an accomplished fighter under the new Marquis of Queensbury Rules. Despite his success, the young Irish-American's social pretensions and boastful manner soon estrange him from his benefactors, who plot to give their conceited former protégé a well-deserved comeuppance. Despite this, his dazzlingly innovative footwork helps him to beat a succession of bigger and stronger men, and he finally finds himself fighting for the world's championship against his childhood idol, John L. Sullivan. Written by duke1029

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

The grandest story of the Naughty "Nineties" becomes the gayest picture of the Fighting "Forties!"


Certificate:

Approved | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Arthur Shields (Father Burke) and John Loder (Carlton De Witt) fought on opposite sides of the Easter Rising of 1916: Shields fought with the Irish republicans while Loder was a second lieutenant in the British Army. Furthermore, Loder was the son of General William Lowe, the British officer to whom Pádraig Pearse surrendered on April 29, 1916. Shields had previously played Pearse in The Plough and the Stars (1936). See more »

Goofs

As the referee counts one of Sullivan's knockdowns, the soundtracks says, "One, two, three, four..." while his lips obviously count, "...four, five, six, seven." See more »

Quotes

Pat Corbett: Do you see that hand?
Harry Corbett: [In unison] Yes.
Mary Corbett: [In unison] Yes.
George Corbett: [In unison] Yes.
Pat Corbett: Well, you're gazin' on the hand that shook the hand of John L. Sullivan!
George Corbett: John L. Sullivan?
Harry Corbett: John L. Sullivan?
Mary Corbett: John Sullivan?
Ma Corbett: [Emphasizing the middle initial] John L. Sullivan!
James J. Corbett aka Gentleman Jim: Well, what are you planning to do with it?
[...]
See more »

Alternate Versions

Also available in a computer colorized version. See more »

Connections

Referenced in The Dick Van Dyke Show: Bupkis (1965) See more »

Soundtracks

The Fountain in the Park
(1884) (uncredited)
aka "While Strolling Through the Park One Day"
Music by Ed Haley
In the score during the opening scene
See more »

User Reviews

 
Raoul Walsh's Light yet Poingant telling of The Jim Corbett Story, With scenes looking like illustrations from THE NATIONAL POLICE GAZETTE.
28 July 2007 | by redryan64See all my reviews

Some saying about 'The Play is the Most Important Thing', or something like that, is attributed to that old Bard of Avon, himself, William Shakewspeare. if it wasn't old Will, it may well have been our own, super-veteran film Director, Mr. Raoul Walsh. There are a large number of his films that would support this hypothesis. None are more appropriate than GENTLEMAN JIM(Warner Brothers, 1942).

The Film also racks up another award, being named as Errol Flynn's favourite of his own starring vehicles. It clearly gives on screen evidence that would easily lead viewers sitting in the darkened theatre, or viewing it on their home TV or DVD, to conclude same.

To be sure, the story is a semi-serious Biopic, which takes a portion of factual material and blends it with a liberal dose of the old imagination to bring us a very satisfying, albeit somewhat fictionalized(what Biopic isn't?)occurrences.

The casting is excellent, as it makes good use of the natural athleticism of our lead, Mr. Errol Flynn. Though not a Swashbuckler, a Western or a War Picture, this GENTLEMAN JIM is perhaps the starring role that was the best fit for the rugged Australian.

Errol was a member of the Australian Olympic Boxing Team in either 1928 or 1932. His training and skills in the 'sweet science'are clearly in evidence throughout the film and especially in the "Big Fight" for the World's Heavyweight Boxing Championship with the great John L.Sullivan,Himself.(played in expert fashion by Ward Bond) The cast reads like a duty roster of Warner Brothers' resident supporting players. It features Alan Hale as Jim Corbet's father, a Livery Wagon operator*. His two brothers are Harry and George (Pat Flaherty and James Flavin), the two 'blue collar' men of the family, their occupations being stated as being 'Longshormen'.

The great Jack Carson does his usual masterful serio-comic performance in support as Jim Corbett's friend and fellow bank teller. The rest of those we can both recognize and remember are:John Loder, William Frawley,Madeleine LeBeau, Minor Watson, Rhys Williams,Arthur Shields,Dorothy Vaughn to name but a few.

Director Walsh also used a number of Pro Wrestlers in roles of various Boxers. Hence we have Ed "Strangler" Lewis and an unknown Grappler* are featured as the 2 waterfront pugs in the opening scenes. Others were Sammy Stein, Mike Mazurki(ever hear of him?)and "Wee Willie" Davis. These guys had a powerful,yet unpolished look about them that the old Pier 9 brawlers would have possessed.

We haven't forgotten Leading Lady, Alexis Smith. She is powerful in her characterization of an "independent" woman, yet maintains enough true ability as a comic player in many of the scenes. She displays quite a range in her part as poor little rich girl, Victoria Lodge.

With all these ingredients at hand, the trick is how to mix the elements in proper proportions to give it the 'just right' blend. Well, Director Walsh does so with a reckless abandon. Because he is looking for, above all, a great film. His treatment shows all of the skills he had honed to a fine tuning starting with his days as a player with D.W. Griffith. Mr. Walsh seems to have a special fondness for that period, the 1890's.*** Mr. Walsh's direction moves through the script at a fairly fast clip, breaking up the exposition scenes with a humorous punch-line, "the Corbetts are at it again!" Hence, he is able to maintain a light, even humorous touch to a story which could become too drab and serious.

Furthermore, in an almost unnoticed element, Brother Walsh gives us an authentic look of a San Francisco of the 1890's. And as a further example of his fondness for that period, he creates wide, dynamic images of the historic Prize Fights. There is a vibrant, joyful mood conveyed in those Boxing scenes. As a crowning glory to this great, perhaps underrated film, Director Walsh gave the image a look as if it were an illustration from The Police Gazette, which covered such events in those "Old Days".

But there's just one thing to remember before viewing. If it is for the first time, or if your seeing it once more:

"THE CORBETS ARE AT IT AGAIN!!"

* In my humble opinion as a historian of both Film and Pro Wrestling, it looks like Tor Johnson, who years later was a favourite of Director Ed Wood's.

** A 'Livery' is a somewhat archaic term for a vehicle for hire for local city transportation.

*** It's true. Mr. Raoul Walsh was a Griffith Veteran Player. He was the actor to portray John Wilkes Booth in THE BIRTH OF A NATION(1915).

**** Being born in 1887, Raoul Walsh was old enough to have his own memories of the 1890's and of the Sullivan-Corbett Championship Bout and what it meant to the Sporting Life in the America of those days.


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Details

Country:

USA

Language:

English

Release Date:

14 November 1942 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

Der freche Kavalier See more »

Company Credits

Production Co:

Warner Bros. See more »
Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Mono (RCA Sound System)

Aspect Ratio:

1.37 : 1
See full technical specs »

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