6.8/10
3,563
40 user 27 critic

Flying Tigers (1942)

Approved | | Action, Drama, Romance | 8 October 1942 (USA)
Capt. Jim Gordon's command of the famed American mercenary fighter group in China is complicated by the recruitment of an old friend who is a reckless hotshot.

Director:

David Miller

Writers:

Kenneth Gamet (screen play), Barry Trivers (screen play) | 1 more credit »
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Nominated for 3 Oscars. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
John Wayne ... Capt. Jim Gordon
John Carroll ... Woody Jason
Anna Lee ... Brooke Elliott
Paul Kelly ... Hap Davis
Gordon Jones ... Alabama Smith
Mae Clarke ... Verna Bales
Addison Richards ... Col. Lindsay
Edmund MacDonald ... Blackie Bales
Bill Shirley ... Dale
Tom Neal ... Reardon
Malcolm 'Bud' McTaggart Malcolm 'Bud' McTaggart ... McCurdy (as Malcolm 'Bud'McTaggart)
David Bruce ... Lt. Barton
Chester Gan ... Mike
Jimmie Dodd ... McIntosh (as James Dodd)
Gregg Barton ... Tex Norton
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Storyline

Jim Gordon commands a unit of the famed Flying Tigers, the American Volunteer Group which fought the Japanese in China before America's entry into World War II. Gordon must send his outnumbered band of fighter pilots out against overwhelming odds while juggling the disparate personalities and problems of his fellow flyers. In particular, he must handle the difficulties created by a reckless hot-shot pilot named Woody Jason, who not only wants to fight a one-man war but to waltz off with Gordon's girlfriend. Written by Jim Beaver <jumblejim@prodigy.net>

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

STRONG Brave Men Flying In The Face Of Death That We May LIVE See more »

Genres:

Action | Drama | Romance | War

Certificate:

Approved | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

This film's opening prologue is a quote from Kai-Shek Chiang. It states: "Since the Flying Tigers first spread their wings in the skies above China, the enemy has learned to fear the intrepid spirit they have displayed in face of his superior numbers. They have become the symbol of the invincible strength of the forces now upholding the cause of justice and humanity. The Chinese people will preserve forever the memory of their glorious achievements." 'Generalissimo CHIANG KAI-SHEK' See more »

Goofs

When Woody is taxiing the cargo plane and taking off down the runway, he keeps turning the control wheel left and right, as if he were driving a car. The first lesson of one's first flight is that one does not touch the wheel or stick whilst on the ground. The rudder, controlled by foot pedals, is used to steer the plane on the ground. Turning the wheel left and right would cause the wingtips to dig into the ground. See more »

Quotes

Woody Jason: [after hitting bridge and supply train] Give the gentleman a cee-gar!
Jim Gordon: If they wanna cross that river, they'll have to swim it!
See more »

Alternate Versions

Also available in a computer colorized version. See more »

Connections

Featured in Special Effects: Anything Can Happen (1996) See more »

Soundtracks

That Old Feeling
(uncredited)
Music by Sammy Fain
Played on a record in the Chinese restaurant
See more »

User Reviews

 
campy and over-the-top fun
26 January 2006 | by MartinHaferSee all my reviews

I am a real sucker for some of the old Republic films--particularly the wartime films. Yes, I know they are NOT artistic masterpieces and the movies of course take advantage of many cinema clichés BUT they also deliver wonderful, if somewhat low-brow, entertainment.

Despite John Wayne being billed as the lead, he is in fact somewhat of a background figure during much of the movie. Instead, the main focus seems to be on the incredibly glib and cocky John Carrol. He's a jerk and he's terribly selfish but boy can he fly. And, Wayne, being an old pal of Carrol's knows that down deep Carrol will prove himself in the end.

Along the way, we are treated to a liberal dose of the nobility of our Chinese comrades in arms as well as the inherent decency of our volunteer pilots. While all basically true, it has all the expected touches of a WWII American propaganda film. For me, that's not really a bad thing, as this film and others like it succeed in being great entertainment. In fact, because of this, I have seen this film several times. It's not exactly deep or sophisticated, but sometimes we NEED a film we can just enjoy and not think too deeply about.


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Details

Country:

USA

Language:

English

Release Date:

8 October 1942 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

Yanks Over the Burma Road See more »

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Box Office

Gross USA:

$3,270,000
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

Production Co:

Republic Pictures (I) See more »
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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Mono (RCA Sound System)

Color:

Black and White (archive footage)| Black and White

Aspect Ratio:

1.37 : 1
See full technical specs »

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