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Joanna Kulig (‘Cold War’) on embodying the ‘destructive personality’ of a singer in a tumultuous love affair [Exclusive Video Interview]

Joanna Kulig (‘Cold War’) on embodying the ‘destructive personality’ of a singer in a tumultuous love affair [Exclusive Video Interview]
Joanna Kulig knew from reading director Pawel Pawlikowski‘s script that the role of Zula offered her an “opportunity” to show off a wide range. “I dance, I sing and I act,” she explains about portraying a woman with a “destructive personality” from the age of 18 to 33. She describes the character as a “wounded bird,” a woman who is “sensitive, and at the same time wild.” Watch our exclusive video interview with Kulig above.

See 2019 Oscars: Foreign-language film entries from A (Afghanistan) to Y (Yemen)

Set during the Cold War in 1950s Europe, this Amazon Studios release centers on a tempestuous romance between a middle-aged conductor (Tomasz Kot) and a young soloist (Kulig), who are temperamentally and politically mismatched. Their affair spans 15 years and traverses Poland, Germany, Yugoslavia, and France. The film is the official Polish entry for the Best Foreign Language Film Oscar, a prize that was previously won by Pawlikowski’s last film,
See full article at Gold Derby »

FilmStruck Fading To Black In Latest WarnerMedia Digital Shutdown

  • Deadline
FilmStruck Fading To Black In Latest WarnerMedia Digital Shutdown
WarnerMedia said Friday it is shuttering FilmStruck, its subscription streaming service that offers indie movies and prestige titles that are part of the Criterion Collection.

The AT&T entertainment content arm, which has made similar movies with its Korean movie VOD service DramaFever and SuperDeluxe, informed users who logged onto FilmStruck’s website that it was accepting no more subs as of today. It will go dark for good on November 29.

The shuffling of the streaming deck comes as WarnerMedia moves forward with ambitious plans for a new, direct-to-consumer streaming service launching by the end of 2019. That new platform will feature a range of programming from the media company’s broad collection of films, TV shows, animation and library. The as-yet-unnamed offering, announced two weeks ago, will have HBO as its foundation and will augment other streaming services like HBO Now. Other niche streaming services under WarnerMedia’s Warner Bros./Turner
See full article at Deadline »

Why ‘A Star Is Born’ Speaks to Our Time

  • Variety
Why ‘A Star Is Born’ Speaks to Our Time
“A Star Is Born,” Bradley Cooper’s justly celebrated remake of the venerable Hollywood romantic fable, starring Cooper as the bad-ol’-boy rock ‘n’ roller Jackson Maine and Lady Gaga as Ally, the ingenuous singer-songwriter he falls for and helps to elevate to pop stardom, is a movie that’s tingly and transporting in all the ways you want it to be.

In a year that’s already shaping up to be as competitive among lead actors as any I can recall, Cooper, as the rock legend who’s a secret wreck, digs deeper than any actor I’ve seen in any movie this year. He inhabits the role with a sunburnt, gin-soaked authenticity that’s uncanny, but his performance has layers — it keeps taking the measure of what makes Jackson tick. And Lady Gaga is a revelation. She’s at ease on screen in the way that a pop
See full article at Variety »

‘Love, Simon’: The best gay couple in movie history?

‘Love, Simon’: The best gay couple in movie history?
There have been plenty of iconic heterosexual couples in movies: from Jack and Rose in “Titanic” and Baby and Johnny in “Dirty Dancing” all the way back to Ilsa and Rick in “Casablanca” and Rhett and Scarlett in “Gone with the Wind.” And there are also loads of homosexual cou- oh, wait, no, that’s not right.

But at the least the few gay duos that have broken through are genuinely adored couples. And each year, we get a new one, so there’s hope on that front. This year’s addition to the slim list comes from “Love, Simon” with Simon (Nick Robinson) and his e-mail lover Blue.

But where do they rank amongst the other gay couples of film history? Choose your favorite couple in the poll below! And if your personal pick isn’t on the list, let us know in the comments section.

Discuss Join the
See full article at Gold Derby »

Madeline Kahn movies: 12 greatest films, ranked worst to best, include ‘Young Frankenstein,’ ‘Blazing Saddles’

  • Gold Derby
Madeline Kahn movies: 12 greatest films, ranked worst to best, include ‘Young Frankenstein,’ ‘Blazing Saddles’
We lost Madeline Kahn, a farceur extraordinaire, far too soon. And her list of film appearances, especially ones that fully showcase her unique comedic talents, is tragically short. But thank goodness for that marvelously mad Mel Brooks for letting her loose in a quartet of some of the most gut-bustingly funny female performances in cinematic history.

Kahn, who passed away at age 57 in 1999, would have celebrated her 76th birthday on September 29. What better way to salute her legacy on the big screen than to recall the two-time Oscar nominee’s 12 greatest movies, ranked from worst to best. Our photo gallery above includes “Blazing Saddles,” “What’s Up, Doc?” and “Young Frankenstein.”

SEEWhich 15 People Have the Egot?

12. History Of The World, Part 1 (1981)

There is a reason that there never was a “Part 2.” This slapdash episodic burlesque of eras past ranging from the Stone Age to the Spanish Inquisition finds Kahn as
See full article at Gold Derby »

Remembering Aretha Franklin, Barbara Harris, Neil Simon and More Reel-Important People We Lost in August

  • Movies.com
Reel-Important People is a monthly column that highlights those individuals in or related to the movies that have left us in recent weeks. Below you'll find names big and small and from all areas of the industry, though each was significant to the movies in his or her own way. Andre Blay (1937-2018) - Producer. His movies include John Carpenter's They Live, Prince of Darkness and Village of the Damned as well as the 1988 remake of The Blob. He died on August 24. (Hometown Weekly) Silvano Campeggi (1923-2018) - Poster Designer. His iconic movie posters include those for Gone With the Wind, Gigi, Ben-Hur, Singin' in the Rain, An American in Paris, West Side Story, Breakfast at Tiffany's, Exodus and Casablanca. He died on August 28. (La Repubblica) Mary Carlisle...
See full article at Movies.com »

The Ready Room Presents Casablanca: An Immersive Experience at the Mahler Ballroom in St. Louis September 28th

The Ready Room is excited to announce they’re teaming up with Talent Plus and the Mahler Ballroom to present a series of events the likes of which have never been seen before in St. Louis. Tickets can be purchased Here

Join them at the Mahler Ballroom and step into the world of Casablanca. Ben Nordstrom has written and directed immersive theatre pieces which will bring attendees into the film and Ryan Marquez will be performing his own stylized adaptations of music from the film.

This is going to be a swanky cocktail party, with unforgettable programming, and an impeccable venue. And the first drink is free!

I there was ever a film deserved to be considered a classic then Casablanca is it, Even if you haven’t seen it before you’ll recognize much of the dialogue; it is probably the most quoted, and misquoted, film of all time.
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

Ingrid Bergman movies: 15 greatest films, ranked worst to best, include ‘Casablanca,’ ‘Gaslight,’ ‘Notorious’

  • Gold Derby
Ingrid Bergman movies: 15 greatest films, ranked worst to best, include ‘Casablanca,’ ‘Gaslight,’ ‘Notorious’
August 29 marks the 103rd anniversary of the birth of legendary film star Ingrid Bergman. Born in Stockholm, she was working in Swedish and German films during the 1930s, when one of her Swedish films, 1936’s “Intermezzo,” caught the eye of powerful Hollywood producer David O. Selznick. He announced that he planned to remake “Intermezzo” in English and would bring Bergman to Hollywood to star. The only problem was that Bergman didn’t speak English, but she turned out to be a fast learner, and the combination of her work ethic and her radiant beauty put Bergman well on her way to becoming an authentic movie star.

Not only did Bergman become an audience favorite, but her acting skills earned her the respect of moviegoers and Hollywood producers alike. In the course of her four-decade film career, Bergman was nominated for seven Academy Awards, winning three for “Gaslight,” “Anastasia” and “Murder on the Orient Express
See full article at Gold Derby »

Ingrid Bergman movies: 15 greatest films ranked from worst to best

  • Gold Derby
Ingrid Bergman movies: 15 greatest films ranked from worst to best
August 29 marks the 103rd anniversary of the birth of legendary film star Ingrid Bergman. Born in Stockholm, she was working in Swedish and German films during the 1930s, when one of her Swedish films, 1936’s “Intermezzo,” caught the eye of powerful Hollywood producer David O. Selznick. He announced that he planned to remake “Intermezzo” in English and would bring Bergman to Hollywood to star. The only problem was that Bergman didn’t speak English, but she turned out to be a fast learner, and the combination of her work ethic and her radiant beauty put Bergman well on her way to becoming an authentic movie star.

Not only did Bergman become an audience favorite, but her acting skills earned her the respect of moviegoers and Hollywood producers alike. In the course of her four-decade film career, Bergman was nominated for seven Academy Awards, winning three for “Gaslight,” “Anastasia” and “Murder on the Orient Express
See full article at Gold Derby »

AMPAS Announces Changes To Academy Awards Telecast

  • CinemaRetro
"Lawrence of Arabia". "The Godfather". "Gone with the Wind". "Casablanca". Is it time for "Ant-Man and the Wasp" to also enjoy Oscar gold?

By Lee Pfeiffer, Cinema Retro Editor-in- Chief

The Academy of Motion Picture Arts & Sciences has announced changes to its annual Oscars broadcast. The event will be confined to three hours and certain awards will not be seen live on the broadcast. Instead, they will be given out during commercial broadcasts then edited into a segment that will be shown later in the telecast. After all, who wants to see some science-obsessed geek get honored for inventing something that enhanced the film industry when, instead, we can all enjoy some innovative ads for erectile dysfunction? Additionally, in an admitted attempt to gin up ratings, AMPAS will introduce a new awards category for outstanding achievement in popular film. That's right, movie lovers...you might live to see the day
See full article at CinemaRetro »

Barry Levinson: The Oscar-Winning Director Who Decades Ago Saw TV’s Peak Potential and Trump-like Danger

Barry Levinson: The Oscar-Winning Director Who Decades Ago Saw TV’s Peak Potential and Trump-like Danger
This weekend, Academy Award-winning director Barry Levinson (“Rain Man”) will be honored with the Crystal Globe for outstanding artistic contribution to world cinema at the Karlovy Vary Film Festival in the Czech Republic. Levinson’s feature filmmaking career has been long and varied, having started with writing for Mel Brooks before directing movies that ranged from the personal (“Diner”) to Robin Williams comedies to Oscar-nominated dramas to prescient political satires and Al Pacino-starring biopics (“Paterno” “You Don’t Know Jack”).

Hollywood no longer makes the type of mid-budget, theatrically released feature films Levinson became known for, but he doesn’t share many of his contemporaries’ dismay about the industry’s significant shift toward TV and streaming. A decade before “The Sopranos” and “The Wire” helped usher in the current “Peak TV” wave, Levinson and his Baltimore Pictures was responsible for introducing then-reporter David Simon to TV with “Homicide: Life on the Street
See full article at Indiewire »

Warner Bros. Town Hall: John Stankey Fields Bugs Bunny Question, Promises Better Cell Coverage

  • Variety
John Stankey, the man tasked with integrating WarnerMedia into the At&T family, tried to sell employees at the company’s film and television studio on the virtues of being part of a global telecommunications giant. He promised to enhance cellular service on Warner Bros.’s studio lot during an hour-long presentation to staffers on Wednesday, receiving sustained applause from a group of Valley-toilers who have long been frustrated by dropped calls and dodgy signals.

The meeting is one of a series of sit-downs that Stankey, the newly minted WarnerMedia CEO, is doing this week in the wake of At&T’s $85 billion purchase of Time Warner. The company has been rechristened WarnerMedia, but so far At&T has taken pains to stress that it wants its new employees to continue making movies, shows, and other entertainment products despite having new corporate parents.

Stankey did just promise that Warner Bros. staffers
See full article at Variety »

Chris Wood Is Leaving Supergirl, Though A Return Isn’t Ruled Out

As fans might’ve guessed from watching last night’s Supergirl season 3 finale, Chris Wood is bowing out of the role of Daxamite hero Mon-El and won’t be returning as a regular for season 4 of The CW’s DC TV show. Yesterday’s closer to the current run saw the character decide to leave behind Central City – and his former lover Kara Zor-El – to continue his duties as a protector of the world in the far future, as part of the Legion of Super-Heroes.

Executive producer Robert Rovner explained to TVLine that Mon-El’s exit completes a two-year arc they always had in mind for him, ever since Wood first joined Supergirl at the beginning of season 2.

“The plan for Chris was always to have him on the show for two years. We’ve loved telling Mon-El’s story, as well as the story we’ve told for him and Kara.
See full article at We Got This Covered »

‘Grim Fandango Remastered’ And ‘Broken Age’ Are Coming to Switch

  • Variety
“Grim Fandango Remastered” and “Broken Age” are coming to the Nintendo Switch, Double Fine ProductionsTim Schafer announced during the E3 2018 Coliseum event on Tuesday.

“Grim Fandango” is a classic point-and-click adventure game released by LucasArts on PC in 1998. Heavily inspired by films like “Casablanca” and “The Maltese Falcon,” as well as Aztec folklore, it tells the story of Manny Calavera and his search a woman named Meche in the Land of the Dead. It was the first LucasArts adventure game to use 3D computer graphics on pre-rendered backgrounds. Double Fine released the remastered version in 2015 with updated visuals, a re-recorded score with a full live orchestra, and a director’s’ commentary.

“Broken Age,” meanwhile, launched in two parts in 2014 and 2015 and was Tim Schafer’s first return to the point-and-click adventure genre since “Grim Fandango.” Double Fine ran a Kickstarter campaign for the game in 2012 and it quickly became
See full article at Variety »

Dave Bautista, Drew Pearce Dipped Into Own Pockets Out of ‘Love’ for ‘Hotel Artemis’

  • The Wrap
Dave Bautista, Drew Pearce Dipped Into Own Pockets Out of ‘Love’ for ‘Hotel Artemis’
“Hotel Artemis” writer and director Drew Pearce can’t stop raving about his A-list cast, especially the ones that pitched in some money in to elevate the low-budget production into what it turned out to be.

“We had no money, and no one was getting paid,” Pearce told TheWrap. “This is literally a movie where Dave Bautista wanted to have a neck tattoo for his character and I didn’t have enough money to do that, but there was so much love in this movie that Dave surprised me and had the tattoo designed and had a guy come to set every day and put it on for him.”

Additionally, Pearce explained, Pearce “bought the bank robber masks on my credit card. It’s that movie!”

Also Read: 'Hotel Artemis' Film Review: Jodie Foster Heals Criminals, but This Dystopian Thriller Still Ails

Pearce said the film’s budget was $15 million,
See full article at The Wrap »

Unpopular Opinions: Horror Movie Edition

Every now and again I will wake up, roll over, check my phone and find some new film-related tweet trending that I can’t help but be enamored by. Most recently it was #FilmStruck4, where users were invited to share the four movies that most directly define you and your moviegoing experience. Before that it was everybody sharing what their #7FavFilms were. This morning, however, it was unpopular opinions about

Unpopular Opinions: Horror Movie Edition
See full article at TVovermind.com »

It’s Official: Deadpool Is Now Cooler Than Han Solo

  • Variety
It’s Official: Deadpool Is Now Cooler Than Han Solo
It’s not every day that I feel sorry for an actor, especially one who’s lucky enough to have landed the lead role in a “Star Wars” film. But I honestly began to feel a little bad for Alden Ehrenreich in “Solo: A Star Wars Story.” It was during the scene where, acting opposite Emilia Clarke, he attempts to signify the Awesome Casual Cockiness Of His Inner Being by slouching against a wall, hands on hips, his fingers spread out just so, in a John Wayne-meets-Clark Gable sort of swashbuckling cowboy-stud pose. At that moment, Ehrenreich doesn’t seem remotely like a young version of Harrison Ford’s lone-wolf space pilot; he seems like a sculpture of it. You don’t see the acting — you see the coaching.

I felt bad for Ehrenreich because it’s not his fault that some executive board meeting signed off on
See full article at Variety »

Bill Gold Dies: ‘Casablanca’, ‘The Exorcist’, ‘J. Edgar’ Poster Designer Was 97

Bill Gold Dies: ‘Casablanca’, ‘The Exorcist’, ‘J. Edgar’ Poster Designer Was 97
Bill Gold, the graphic designer responsible for some of the most indelible and powerful images in Hollywood history, died Sunday at Greenwich Hospital in Connecticut. He was 97, and his death, the result of complications of Alzheimer’s disease, was confirmed by a family spokeswoman.

Gold was remembered on Twitter by, among others, Malcolm McDowell, whose image as the knife-wielding droog of A Clockwork Orange was captured in Gold’s unforgettable poster (see it and other tweets below).

From 1942 – the year he designed the Casablanca poster that would land the gun-toting Humphrey Bogart on countless college dorm walls for decades – to 2011, when a ranting Leonardo DiCaprio was transformed into an aging J. Edgar Hoover for J. Edgar, Gold’s poster art and designs for scores and scores of movies not only enticed audiences into handing over whatever was the going rate for tickets, but sometimes even bettered the films themselves.

But
See full article at Deadline »

[R.I.P.] Legendary Artist Bill Gold Designed the Posters for ‘The Exorcist’ and ‘Clockwork Orange’

[R.I.P.] Legendary Artist Bill Gold Designed the Posters for ‘The Exorcist’ and ‘Clockwork Orange’
The image of Father Merrin arriving at the MacNeil home is one of the most enduring in horror cinema, first seen on The Exorcist‘s original poster. That poster was designed by Bill Gold, whose art for The Exorcist and films like Deliverance, Casablanca, Dirty Harry, and A Clockwork Orange is as iconic as the films themselves. Today we’re sad to report that […]
See full article at Bloody-Disgusting.com »

‘Cold War’ Film Review: Romance in Postwar Europe Is Ravishing and Haunted

‘Cold War’ Film Review: Romance in Postwar Europe Is Ravishing and Haunted
Four years after his film “Ida” won the foreign-language Oscar, Polish director Pawel Pawlikowski has returned to the look of that film and to the unsettled arena of Europe in the decades after World War II. “Cold War,” which had its world premiere on Thursday night at the Cannes Film Festival’s Grand Theatre Lumiere, shares some strengths with its predecessor, but this is a movie of the flesh, not the spirit.

In the director’s last film, a young woman on the verge of becoming a nun travels through a sparse countryside still haunted by the ghosts of World War II. “Ida” is an austere film, but one that plumbed the depths of postwar guilt and tragedy and made its characters fight for their faith.

This time around, his characters move in a landscape that was formed by the war: a divided Europe, with Poland under the sway of Stalin’s Soviet Union and suspicious of Western influences. And this time, his lead characters, Zula and Wiktor, are fighting for love, meeting in different cities at different times to reclaim a bond that began when Zula was a young music student and Wiktor was her instructor.

Also Read: Cannes Confirms 'Don Quixote' for Closing Night, Praises Court Win: 'Cinema Has Regained Its Rights'

Europe in the 1940s and ’50s has been a fertile setting for doomed love since “Casablanca,” and “Cold War” gives us another of those. But Pawlikowski is a lyrical, mysterious filmmaker with a ravishing visual sense; if we’ve seen lovers pulled together and torn apart in Paris and Berlin before, we haven’t seen them look and feel like this.

In “Ida,” Pawlikowski shot in lustrous black and white and used an almost square 4:3 aspect ratio, which almost feels square to the viewer; it disconcerted his original cinematographer, and often made his characters feel isolated with a large amount of space above their heads.

He does the same thing on “Cold War,” often to similar effect, but he also finds other astonishing shots: a gorgeous sequence where Zula floats down a river on her back with all but her face and hands submerged, and a final scene where the couple stages their own ceremony in a derelict, haunted church.

Also Read: Cannes Report, Day 2: 'Rafiki' Makes History, 'Don Quixote' Scores Legal Victory

But then, all of “Cold War” is haunted – partly by the conflict that tore a continent apart and put it back together with a fault line down the middle, and partly by matters of the heart. But its characters only glancingly face their ghosts; most of the time, they sing and play their songs (Polish folk tunes, then anthems to Stalin, then ’50s jazz and pop), fall in and out of other relationships and try to pretend that they can each live without their soulmate.

They can’t, of course, but they can’t really live with their soulmates, either. Joanna Kulig makes Zula impetuous and daring, Tomasz Kot gives Wiktor deep reserves of longing and sorrow, and together they make their way through a landscape that would be inhospitable even to less tortured and less complicated lovers.

If it doesn’t feel as fresh and bracing as “Ida” did, that film may have been the perfect combination of form and content. “Cold War,” which is Pawlikowski’s first entry in Cannes main competition, is in some ways more familiar, but the spin he puts on it is distinctly and beautifully his own creation.

Read original story ‘Cold War’ Film Review: Romance in Postwar Europe Is Ravishing and Haunted At TheWrap
See full article at The Wrap »
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