6.8/10
1,164
24 user 12 critic

Major Barbara (1941)

Approved | | Comedy | 2 August 1941 (UK)
A young and idealistic woman, who has adopted the Salvation Army and whose father is an armament industrialist, will save more souls directing her father's business. A comedy with social commentary.

Directors:

Gabriel Pascal, Harold French (uncredited) | 1 more credit »

Writers:

George Bernard Shaw (original play), George Bernard Shaw (scenario and dialogue) | 1 more credit »
Reviews
1 nomination. See more awards »

Photos

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Wendy Hiller ... Major Barbara Undershaft
Rex Harrison ... Adolphus Cusins
Robert Morley ... Andrew Undershaft
Robert Newton ... Bill Walker
Sybil Thorndike ... The General
Emlyn Williams ... Snobby Price
Marie Lohr ... Lady Britomart
Penelope Dudley-Ward ... Sarah Undershaft
Walter Hudd ... Stephen Undershaft
David Tree ... Charles Lomax
Deborah Kerr ... Jenny Hill
Donald Calthrop ... Peter Shirley
Marie Ault ... Rummy Mitchens
Cathleen Cordell ... Mog Habbijam
Torin Thatcher ... Todger Fairmile
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Storyline

A young and idealistic woman, who has adopted the Salvation Army and whose father is an armament industrialist, will save more souls directing her father's business. A comedy with social commentary.

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Genres:

Comedy

Certificate:

Approved | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

This movie received its earliest documented U.S. telecasts in Chicago and Cincinnati on Sunday, October 23, 1949 on WGN (Channel 9) and on WLW-T (Channel 4), in Detroit on Sunday, October 30, 1949 on WWJ (Channel 4), in Atlanta on Wednesday, November 16, 1949 on WSB (Channel 8), in New York City on Friday, January 20, 1950 on WPIX (Channel 11), and in Los Angeles on Saturday, March 4, 1950 on KTLA (Channel 5). See more »

Goofs

(at around 1h 35 mins) Just before she scolds her husband for addressing her as "Biddy", a boom mic shadow passes over the lace trim on the bosom of Lady Britomart's (Marie Lohr) gown. See more »

Quotes

Andrew Underschaft: Oh, very well. Have it your own way. You know nothing and you think you know everything. That points clearly to a political career.
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Alternate Versions

As originally released, this featured a spoken prologue featuring George Bernard Shaw himself, but it has been cut from all TV and VHS prints. See more »

Connections

Version of Majoor Barbara (1964) See more »

Soundtracks

How Sweet the Name of Jesus Sounds
(uncredited)
Music by Alexander Reinagle (1836)
Words by John Newton (1779)
Arranged by William Walton
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User Reviews

A few more comments
4 March 2005 | by rich-473See all my reviews

This movie is a George Bernard Shaw vehicle. As such it is very heavy handed. But of course that's what we love about Shaw. Isn't it?

No one yet has mentioned the cinematography. I'm no student on this topic, but the scenes where Undershaft gives a tour of his factory and his vision of paradise are truly awe inspiring. There's nothing subtle in it, it is quite vivid for its time. And I think black & white is perfect here. If it were done today in color, I'm sure it would lose something. As someone else said they're not sure why the movie is a comedy. Intentional (as a comedy) or not, t could be this scene.

I haven't seen the movie in years, it is this one scene that lives on in memory above all others.


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Frequently Asked Questions

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Details

Country:

UK

Language:

English

Release Date:

2 August 1941 (UK) See more »

Also Known As:

Major Barbara See more »

Company Credits

Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Mono (Western Electric Mirrophonic Recording)

Aspect Ratio:

1.37 : 1
See full technical specs »

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