6.1/10
162
8 user 3 critic

40,000 Horsemen (1940)

Approved | | Drama, History, War | 26 December 1940 (Australia)
Three young Australians join the army at the beginning of World War I and are assigned to the Australian Light Horse cavalry, which is serving in Palestine. The three eventually take part ... See full summary »

Director:

Charles Chauvel

Writers:

Elsa Chauvel (continuity), Charles Chauvel (story) | 1 more credit »
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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Grant Taylor ... Red Gallagher
Betty Bryant Betty Bryant ... Juliet Rouget
Chips Rafferty ... Jim
Pat Twohill Pat Twohill ... Larry
Harvey Adams Harvey Adams ... Von Hausen
Eric Reiman Eric Reiman ... Von Schiller
Joe Valli Joe Valli ... Scotty
Albert C. Winn Albert C. Winn ... Sheik Abu
Kenneth Brampton Kenneth Brampton ... German Officer
John Fleeting John Fleeting ... Capt. Gordon
Harry Abdy Harry Abdy ... Paul Rouget
Norman Maxwell Norman Maxwell ... Ismet
Pat Penny Pat Penny ... Capt. Seidi
Charles Zoli Charles Zoli ... Cafe Proprietor
Claude Turton Claude Turton ... Othman (as Claude Turtin)
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Storyline

Three young Australians join the army at the beginning of World War I and are assigned to the Australian Light Horse cavalry, which is serving in Palestine. The three eventually take part in the attack during the Battle of Beersheba, which was the last cavalry charge in modern warfare. Written by frankfob2@yahoo.com

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Taglines:

THE FIGHTING ANZACS! (AT HOME IN ANY GIRL'S ARMS) (original print media ad - all caps) See more »

Genres:

Drama | History | War

Certificate:

Approved | See all certifications »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

When the film was presented to the Australian censor, Creswell O'Reilly, the scenes of the falling horses looked so realistic that the censor insisted they be cut from the film. Charles Chauvel personally invited the Minister for Customs to see the film and decide for himself. The film was passed uncut and broke all Australian box office records to that date. See more »

Quotes

Red Gallagher: Come to think of it, what's it all about? What are we fighting for?
Jim: I suppose it's about the right to stand up on a soap box in the Domain, tell the boss what to do with his job if you don't like it. And the right to start off as a roustabout and finish as prime minister, that's what we're fighting for...
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Soundtracks

Waltzing Matilda
(uncredited)
Original music by Christina McPherson (uncredited), revised music by Marie Cowan (uncredited) and lyrics by A.B. 'Banjo' Paterson (uncredited)
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User Reviews

 
possibly the most exciting cavalry charge ever filmed
9 July 2001 | by wpeakeSee all my reviews

Although filmed 60 years ago I cannot think of a more thrilling realisation on film of a massed cavalry assault. The scene, which is sustained for several minutes, recreats the WWI charge of the Australian light horse on the Turkish-held town of Beersheeba, Palestine, in 1917. This is generally accepted as the last successful cavalry charge in military history (typically some eggheads - probably Brits - quibble on whether it was a true cavalry charge because the Australians were armed with bayonets rather than sabres; not that the distinction meant much to the unfortunates who ended up skewered on the end of them.)

Also noteworthy for the presence of Chips Rafferty, in a typical role as a gangling Aussie bushmen, and who, in the days before Paul Hogan, represented the Australian male as he liked to imagine himself.


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Details

Country:

Australia

Language:

English

Release Date:

26 December 1940 (Australia) See more »

Also Known As:

Forty Thousand Horsemen See more »

Company Credits

Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Mono

Aspect Ratio:

1.37 : 1
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