7.5/10
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The Thief of Bagdad (1940)

Not Rated | | Adventure, Family, Fantasy | 25 December 1940 (USA)
After being tricked and cast out of Bagdad by the evil Jaffar, King Ahmad joins forces with a thief named Abu to reclaim his throne, the city, and the Princess he loves.

Writers:

Miles Malleson (screen play and dialogue), Lajos Biró (scenario by) (as Lajos Biro) | 1 more credit »
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Won 3 Oscars. Another 3 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Complete credited cast:
Conrad Veidt ... Jaffar
Sabu ... Abu
June Duprez ... Princess
John Justin ... Ahmad
Rex Ingram ... Djinn
Miles Malleson ... Sultan
Morton Selten ... The Old King
Mary Morris ... Halima
Bruce Winston Bruce Winston ... The Merchant
Hay Petrie Hay Petrie ... Astrologer
Adelaide Hall Adelaide Hall ... Singer
Roy Emerton Roy Emerton ... Jailer
Allan Jeayes Allan Jeayes ... The Story Teller
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Storyline

In Bagdad, the young and naive Sultan Ahmad is curious about the behavior of his people. The Grand Vizier Jaffar convinces Ahmad to walk through the city disguised as a subject to know his people. Then he seizes the power telling to the inhabitants that Ahmad has died while he sends his army to arrest the Sultan that is thrown into the dungeons and sentenced to death. Ahmad befriends the young thief Abu that helps him to escape from the prison. They flee to Basra and plan to travel abroad with Sinbad. However Ahmad stumbles upon the beautiful princess and they fall in love with each other. But the evil Jaffar has also traveled to Basra to propose to marry the princess. When they see each other, Jaffar uses magic to blind Ahmad and turn Abu into a dog. Is their love doomed? Written by Claudio Carvalho, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

IN MAGIC TECHNICOLOR (original print ad - all caps) See more »


Certificate:

Not Rated | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Details

Country:

UK | USA

Language:

English

Release Date:

25 December 1940 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

Le voleur de Bagdad See more »

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Box Office

Gross USA:

$268,948
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Mono (Western Electric Mirrophonic Recording)

Color:

Color (Technicolor)

Aspect Ratio:

1.37 : 1
See full technical specs »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Alexander Korda originally wanted Jon Hall for the part of Ahmad; however, Hall was in the process of signing with Universal Pictures and Universal was keeping him busy and wanted a lot of money to loan him out. So, when Korda couldn't get Hall he lucked out and hired Jon Hall lookalike John Justin. See more »

Goofs

When Ahmad is to be executed, his head is held down with a rope to steady it, but when the executioner raises his sword, the next shots of Ahmad show that the rope has disappeared. See more »

Quotes

[first lines]
Jaffar: The princess. Have you good news for me?
Halima: No, master.
Jaffar: Dead?
Halima: She's still asleep.
See more »

Connections

Referenced in Futurama: The Thief of Baghead (2012) See more »

Soundtracks

Hungarian Lullabye
(uncredited)
Music by Miklós Rózsa
Lyrics by Zoltan Korda
Sung by Adelaide Hall
See more »

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User Reviews

Probably the best "Arabian Nights" film ever made.
6 March 1999 | by otterSee all my reviews

Most of the genre of "Arabian Nights" films were silly, cheesy, low-budget things, like "The Prince Who Was A Thief" starring Tony Curtis as an Arabian prince with a Brooklyn accent. This is an exception: A genuinely magical film, one of the best fantasy films ever made.

A beautiful film made in the most glowing of technicolors, it tells the simple story of a boy thief (Sabu) meeting a dethroned prince (the gorgeous John Justin), and helping him defeat the wonderfully evil usurper Conrad Veidt. Like "The Wizard of Oz" made the year before, the performances are so good that you believe in what you see on the screen. Flying carpets and horses, towering genies, dancing idols, it all seems perfectly believable and exiting. A classic.


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