A self-conscious woman juggles adjusting to her new role as an aristocrat's wife and avoiding being intimidated by his first wife's spectral presence.

Director:

Alfred Hitchcock

Writers:

Daphne Du Maurier (celebrated novel), Robert E. Sherwood (screen play) | 3 more credits »
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Popularity
2,784 ( 333)
Top Rated Movies #227 | Won 2 Oscars. Another 5 wins & 10 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Laurence Olivier ... 'Maxim' de Winter
Joan Fontaine ... Mrs. de Winter
George Sanders ... Jack Favell
Judith Anderson ... Mrs. Danvers
Nigel Bruce ... Major Giles Lacy
Reginald Denny ... Frank Crawley
C. Aubrey Smith ... Colonel Julyan
Gladys Cooper ... Beatrice Lacy
Florence Bates ... Mrs. Van Hopper
Melville Cooper ... Coroner
Leo G. Carroll ... Dr. Baker
Leonard Carey ... Ben
Lumsden Hare ... Tabbs
Edward Fielding ... Frith
Philip Winter Philip Winter ... Robert
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Storyline

A shy lady's companion, staying in Monte Carlo with her stuffy employer, meets the wealthy Maxim de Winter (Sir Laurence Olivier). She and Max fall in love, marry, and return to Manderley, his large country estate in Cornwall. Max is still troubled by the death of his first wife, Rebecca, in a boating accident the year before. The second Mrs. de Winter (Joan Fontaine) clashes with the housekeeper, Mrs. Danvers (Dame Judith Anderson), and discovers that Rebecca still has a strange hold on everyone at Manderley. Written by Col Needham <col@imdb.com>

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

The MOST GLAMOROUS WOMAN of All Time! See more »


Certificate:

Approved | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

David O. Selznick insisted on personally supervising re-takes of the fire scene, which he thought had been indistinct as originally shot. The final shot of flames engulfing the title character's "R" monogram were redone because he thought the initial had not been as carefully framed as Mrs. Danvers would have placed it and the flames hadn't come up quickly enough or high enough. See more »

Goofs

The word pamplemousse (French for grapefruit) is incorrectly spelled as 'pamplemouse' in the Princesse Hotel Monte Carlo menu toward the beginning of the film. See more »

Quotes

Maxim de Winter: That's not the Northern lights. That's Manderley!
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Crazy Credits

The original 1940 credits read "Selznick International presents its picturization of Daphne Du Maurier's 'Rebecca'". The credits on the re-issue version read "The Selznick Studio presents its production of Daphne Du Maurier's 'Rebecca'". See more »

Alternate Versions

The opening credits were re-done (with different font) for the 1950's re-release of the movie. It is these credits that have turned up on all telecasts of the film (even as recently as 2013) and all previous video releases. The Criterion release (which is now only available through outlet stores) restores all of the credits to their original form. See more »

Connections

Referenced in More Tales of the City: Episode #1.1 (1998) See more »

Soundtracks

Love's Old Sweet Song (Just a Song at Twilight)
(1884) (uncredited)
Music by J.L. Molloy
Hummed by Joan Fontaine
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User Reviews

 
'Happiness is something I know nothing about'...
11 September 2020 | by XstalSee all my reviews

... and it's clear to see throughout that Maxim de Winter is not overwrought with joy as we witness a story tacking in one direction, gradually adjusting course to another and finally distorting and folding in on itself with magnificent Hitchcockian escalation towards the end.

If you view this through contemporary eyes alone it's easy to see it as dated, old fashioned, antique perhaps, many things in the past fall foul of fashion sooner or later. Place a pair of pince-nez on the bridge of your nose and witness two great stars, Joan Fontaine is outstanding, add immense depth to an already deep, dark and disturbing tale with some sinister supporting characters thrown in for good measure, none more so than Judith Anderson as the mysterious and cryptic Mrs. Danvers.


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Frequently Asked Questions

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Details

Country:

USA

Language:

English | French

Release Date:

12 April 1940 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

Rebecca See more »

Filming Locations:

Big Sur, California, USA See more »

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Box Office

Budget:

$1,288,000 (estimated)

Cumulative Worldwide Gross:

$72,275
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Mono (Western Electric Noiseless Recording)

Aspect Ratio:

1.37 : 1
See full technical specs »

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