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Pinocchio (1940)

Trailer
1:26 | Trailer
A living puppet, with the help of a cricket as his conscience, must prove himself worthy to become a real boy.

Writers:

Carlo Collodi (from the story by) (as Collodi), Ted Sears (story adaptation) | 6 more credits »
Reviews
Popularity
3,608 ( 408)
Won 2 Oscars. Another 4 wins. See more awards »

Videos

Photos

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Cast

Uncredited cast:
Mel Blanc ... Gideon (hiccoughs) (voice) (uncredited)
Don Brodie Don Brodie ... Carnival Barker (voice) (uncredited)
Stuart Buchanan Stuart Buchanan ... Carnival Barker (voice) (uncredited)
Walter Catlett ... J. Worthington Foulfellow (voice) (uncredited)
Marion Darlington Marion Darlington ... Birds (voice) (uncredited)
Frankie Darro ... Lampwick (voice) (uncredited)
Cliff Edwards ... Jiminy Cricket (voice) (uncredited)
Dickie Jones ... Pinocchio / Alexander (voice) (uncredited)
Charles Judels ... Stromboli / The Coachman (voice) (uncredited)
John McLeish John McLeish ... Carnival Barker (voice) (uncredited)
Clarence Nash Clarence Nash ... Figaro / Rough House Statue / Donkeys (voice) (uncredited)
Patricia Page Patricia Page ... Marionettes (voice) (uncredited)
Christian Rub ... Geppetto (voice) (uncredited)
Bill Thompson ... Whistling Saw (uncredited)
Evelyn Venable ... The Blue Fairy (voice) (uncredited)
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Storyline

Inventor Gepetto creates a wooden marionette called Pinocchio. His wish for Pinocchio to be a real boy is unexpectedly granted by a fairy. The fairy assigns Jiminy Cricket to act as Pinocchio's "conscience" and keep him out of trouble. Jiminy is not too successful in this endeavor and most of the film is spent with Pinocchio deep in trouble. Written by Tim Pickett <quetzal@yoyo.cc.monash.edu.au>

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

Pure enjoyment... with no strings attached. [1984 re-release] See more »


Certificate:

G | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

In the midst of production, the entire Disney animation branch was also in the process of moving from its old home on Hyperion Avenue into new premises in Burbank. See more »

Goofs

When trying to free Pinocchio from Stromboli's cage, Jiminy Cricket takes his jacket and hat off and puts them on the padlock. In a later scene, they are no longer there. See more »

Quotes

[first lines]
Jiminy Cricket: [after singing "When You Wish Upon a Star"] Pretty, huh? I'll bet a lot of you folks don't believe that, about a wish comin' true, do ya? Well, I didn't, either. Of course, I'm just a cricket singing my way from hearth to hearth, but let me tell you what made me change my mind.
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Crazy Credits

The RKO logo is carved into a wood background. See more »

Alternate Versions

The 1954 re-release marked the last time the film was distributed by RKO. After that, it was replaced by the logo for Buena Vista Distribution Co. (Disney's in-house distribution arm). The 1993 VHS release and 1999 DVD features the Buena Vista logo. However, the overseas DVD release in 2003, the Platinum Edition DVD and Blu-ray releases in 2009 and the Walt Disney Signature Collection DVD and Blu-ray releases in 2017 restored the original RKO logo. But both versions include reissue credits, as reference to Technicolor should have read "in Technicolor" but not just "Technicolor". See more »


Soundtracks

Hi-Diddle-Dee-Dee
(1939) (uncredited)
Music by Leigh Harline
Lyrics by Ned Washington
Performed by Walter Catlett and Dickie Jones
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User Reviews

Disney's earliest masterpiece...the art of animation never finer...
14 July 2001 | by DoylenfSee all my reviews

Darker in tone than most Disney animated features (except for 'Hunchback of Notre Dame'), 'Pinocchio' came shortly after 'Snow White' and showed marked improvement in the art of animation technology to produce startling special effects.

The first twenty-five minutes alone raise the film to the level of true animation art. Gepetto's inventive clocks come to life as realistically as any real-life photography could do. The warmth and cosiness of his dwelling and the charming shenanigans of Figaro the kitten and Cleo the goldfish, are all perfectly realized. The imaginative use of music and animation art is never finer than in these opening scenes.

Afterwards, as the plot thickens, the special effects are just as impressive. The scene of Gepetto searching for Pinocchio with a lantern on a rainy night after he has been captured by Stromboli is unforgettable imagery. The wagon lurching along roads with Pinocchio in a cage is a frightening thing. Even darker are the adventures that await Pinocchio when he reaches Pleasure Island. The scene of the boys turning into donkeys is probably one of the most awesome and frightening moments in the film.

Altogether charming are the underwater sequences before the meeting of Monstro the Whale. The climactic chase after the escape from the belly of the whale is handled brilliantly. The music perfectly accents the dramatic chase for this sequence and the songs throughout are in keeping with the mood and characters of the story. It is the sharp contrast between the lighter moments and the darker ones that gives the film a correct blend of fantasy and horror.

Parents should be cautioned that very young children may be frightened. Has to be considered one of the most beautifully animated Disney features of all time. A treasure to see again and again.


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Frequently Asked Questions

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Details

Official Sites:

Official site

Country:

USA

Language:

English

Release Date:

23 February 1940 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

Pinocchio See more »

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Box Office

Budget:

$2,600,000 (estimated)

Opening Weekend USA:

$3,769,251, 25 December 1984

Gross USA:

$84,254,167

Cumulative Worldwide Gross:

$121,892,045
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Mono (RCA Sound Recording)| Dolby SR

Color:

Color (Technicolor)

Aspect Ratio:

1.37 : 1
See full technical specs »

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