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Eliza Doolittle Waltzes Back to Theaters in My Fair Lady February 17th & 20th

What: Eliza Doolittle and Professor Henry Higgins (Academy Award winner Rex Harrison) match wits while singing and dancing their way through one of the most visually magnificent and transcendent musicals of all time in “My Fair Lady.” Remastered for the ultimate visual and audio experience, the hit musical will return to movie theaters nationwide for two days only on February 17 and 20, 2019, accompanied by pre- and post-film insights by TCM Primetime Host Ben Mankiewicz. Winner of eight Academy Awards, including Best Picture, Best Actor (Harrison), Best Director and Best Cinematography, “My Fair Lady” continues to dazzle the eyes, ears and hearts of audiences everywhere with its captivating story of a poor London flower girl, Eliza Doolittle, who is plucked out of obscurity and remade into a glamorous socialite. Based on the Broadway musical by Jay Lerner and Frederick Loewe, “My Fair Lady” contains such indelible songs as “I Could Have Danced All Night,
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

Pauline Kael, Cary Grant, and the Ambiguity of Male Seduction

  • MUBI
In 1975 Pauline Kael wrote an essay about Cary Grant for the New Yorker called “The Man from Dream City.” (The piece is still available to read in full on the magazine’s website.) In the year of Jaws, One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest, Nashville and Alice Doesn’t Live Here Anymore, an actor like Grant must have cut a musty figure, his name a reminder of a different time. The New Hollywood films that Kael championed at the magazine, from Bonnie and Clyde (1967) onwards, took a mean pleasure in defiling the sort of genteel, meticulously fine-tuned comedies with which Grant is synonymous—and yet, no-one can have seized better than Kael the quiddity of Grant, the essence of his stardom. In essence, “The Man from Dream City” reclaims Grant as a singular figure in cinema, proposing him as a revolutionary leading man. As we’ll see, Kael gets
See full article at MUBI »

Grace Kelly movies: All 11 of her films, ranked worst to best, include ‘The Country Girl,’ ‘Rear Window,’ ‘High Noon’

  • Gold Derby
Grace Kelly movies: All 11 of her films, ranked worst to best, include ‘The Country Girl,’ ‘Rear Window,’ ‘High Noon’
Grace Kelly would’ve celebrated her 89th birthday on November 12, 2018. The Oscar-winning actress made just a handful of movies before transforming from a Hollywood princess into a real life one following her marriage to Prince Rainier of Monaco in 1956. In honor of her birthday, let’s take a look back in the photo gallery above of all 11 of her films, ranked worst to best.

Kelly got her start performing onstage and in television before being drafted by Hollywood to appear in Henry Hathaway‘s ripped-from-the-headlines nail-biter “Fourteen Hours” (1951) when she was just 22-years-old. The next year found her starring as the concerned wife to an imperiled town marshal (Gary Cooper) in the landmark western “High Noon” (1952).

She got her first Oscar nomination as Best Supporting Actress for John Ford‘s adventure yarn “Mogambo” (1953), playing one of two love interests (along with Ava Gardner) to big game hunter Clark Gable. The next year,
See full article at Gold Derby »

Pssst! Wanna win an Oscar? Change your image

Pssst! Wanna win an Oscar? Change your image
You don’t have to go the full De Niro, but an image change often leads to Oscar gold.

Known for comedy? Go dramatic. A tough guy? Go comedic. Strikingly beautiful? Glam down.

This awards season funny lady Melissa McCarthy, who earned a supporting actress Oscar nomination for the raunchy 2011 hit “Bridesmaids,” has been receiving stellar reviews for “Can You Ever Forgive Me?” as a prickly and lonely celebrity biographer. McCarthy is on the fast track for Oscar-consideration this year.

Also, a shoo-in for multiple award nomination is Lady Gaga, who traded in her meat dress and platinum blonde tresses for jeans and dark hair to play a struggling singer/songwriter in the acclaimed remake of “A Star is Born.”

Even when the Oscar was in its infancy, performers found altering an image caught the attention of the Academy voters.

DISCUSSJoin the live Oscar discussion going on right now in
See full article at Gold Derby »

Oscar Flashback: The three films that swept the Big Five, including ‘One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest,’ ‘The Silence of the Lambs’

Oscar Flashback: The three films that swept the Big Five, including ‘One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest,’ ‘The Silence of the Lambs’
This article marks Part 6, the final entry in the Gold Derby series reflecting on films that contended for the Big Five Oscars – Best Picture, Best Director, Best Actor, Best Actress and Best Screenplay (Original or Adapted). With “A Star Is Born” this year on the cusp of joining this exclusive group of Oscar favorites, join us as we look back at the 43 extraordinary pictures that earned Academy Awards nominations in each of the Big Five categories, including the following three films that swept all of the top races.

At the 7th Academy Awards ceremony, Frank Capra’s romantic comedy “It Happened One Night” (1934) made Oscar history as the first film to triumph in all of the Big Five categories – Best Picture, Best Director, Best Actor (Clark Gable), Best Actress (Claudette Colbert) and Best Adapted Screenplay (Robert Riskin). For each of these talents, it would hardly be their lone Oscar appearance.
See full article at Gold Derby »

Oscar Flashback: The four films that won four of the Big Five, including ‘Gone with the Wind,’ ‘American Beauty’

Oscar Flashback: The four films that won four of the Big Five, including ‘Gone with the Wind,’ ‘American Beauty’
This article marks Part 5 of the Gold Derby series reflecting on films that contended for the Big Five Oscars – Best Picture, Best Director, Best Actor, Best Actress and Best Screenplay (Original or Adapted). With “A Star Is Born” this year on the cusp of joining this exclusive group of Oscar favorites, join us as we look back at the 43 extraordinary pictures that earned Academy Awards nominations in each of the Big Five categories, including the following four films that scored a quartet of trophies among the top races.

At the 12th Academy Awards ceremony, this was no stopping Victor Fleming’s blockbuster epic “Gone with the Wind” (1939). With a total of 13 nominations, the most of any film that year, it was the overwhelming favorite for Oscar glory and indeed, on the big night, the picture took home eight prizes, including Best Picture. Fleming, in his lone career Oscar bid, prevailed in Best Director,
See full article at Gold Derby »

Oscar Flashback: The six films that earned three of the Big Five, including ‘Network,’ ‘Million Dollar Baby’

Oscar Flashback: The six films that earned three of the Big Five, including ‘Network,’ ‘Million Dollar Baby’
This article marks Part 4 of the Gold Derby series reflecting on films that contended for the Big Five Oscars – Best Picture, Best Director, Best Actor, Best Actress and Best Screenplay (Original or Adapted). With “A Star Is Born” this year on the cusp of joining this exclusive group of Oscar favorites, join us as we look back at the 43 extraordinary pictures that earned Academy Awards nominations in each of the Big Five categories, including the following six films that took home a trio of prizes among the top races.

With a total of 13 nominations, the most of any Oscar contender that year, “From Here to Eternity” (1953) towered over the 26th Academy Awards. At the ceremony, the Fred Zinnemann film dominated, earning eight prizes, including three in the Big Five categories. It earned Best Picture, plus Best Director honors for Zinnemann and Best Adapted Screenplay (Daniel Taradash). While Frank Sinatra and
See full article at Gold Derby »

Oscar Flashback: The 11 films that scored two of the Big Five, including ‘The Philadelphia Story,’ ‘La La Land’

Oscar Flashback: The 11 films that scored two of the Big Five, including ‘The Philadelphia Story,’ ‘La La Land’
This article marks Part 3 of the Gold Derby series reflecting on films that contended for the Big Five Oscars – Best Picture, Best Director, Best Actor, Best Actress and Best Screenplay (Original or Adapted). With “A Star Is Born” this year on the cusp of joining this exclusive group of Oscar favorites, join us as we look back at the 43 extraordinary pictures that earned Academy Awards nominations in each of the Big Five categories, including the following 11 films that scored a pair of prizes among the top races.

At the 4th Academy Awards ceremony, “Cimarron” (1931) made Oscar history as the first motion picture to ever score nominations in the Big Five categories. On the big night, the western took home the top prize in Best Picture, as well as the Oscar in Best Adapted Screenplay (Howard Estabrook). Not as successful were the picture’s director, Wesley Ruggles, topped by Norman Taurog (“Skippy”), and the leads,
See full article at Gold Derby »

Oscar Flashback: The 11 films that won one of the Big Five, including ‘Sunset Boulevard,’ ‘Chinatown’

Oscar Flashback: The 11 films that won one of the Big Five, including ‘Sunset Boulevard,’ ‘Chinatown’
This article marks Part 2 of the Gold Derby series reflecting on films that contended for the Big Five Oscars – Best Picture, Best Director, Best Actor, Best Actress and Best Screenplay (Original or Adapted). With “A Star Is Born” this year on the cusp of joining this exclusive group of Oscar favorites, join us as we look back at the 43 extraordinary pictures that earned Academy Awards nominations in each of the Big Five categories, including the following 11 films that scored a single prize among the top races.

More than eight decades prior to Bradley Cooper’s take on the timeless tale, the first “A Star Is Born” (1937), headlined by Fredric March and Janet Gaynor, became the third motion picture, following “Cimarron” (1931) and “It Happened One Night” (1934), to earn nominations in the Big Five Oscar categories.

At the 10th Academy Awards ceremony, however, neither March nor Gaynor emerged triumphant, losing in their
See full article at Gold Derby »

The Philadelphia Story: Katharine Hepburn’s Hollywood Comeback Story

When talking about Star Power in the context of cinema, no light burned brighter than Katharine Hepburn. Her star simply shined the brightest in a galaxy full of them. A prime example of this can be illustrated by the 1940 romantic screwball comedy “The Philadelphia Story”. Even when flanked by two of the most popular movie stars of all time, Cary Grant and Jimmy Stewart, it is Hepburn who leaves the lasting impression on the audience. What many people do not know however is that “The Philadelphia Story”, in addition to being considered a classic piece of American cinema, represented

The Philadelphia Story: Katharine Hepburn’s Hollywood Comeback Story
See full article at TVovermind.com »

Fox Searchlight Backs Scotty Bowers Biopic Based on Sexy Tell-All Memoir — Exclusive

Fox Searchlight Backs Scotty Bowers Biopic Based on Sexy Tell-All Memoir — Exclusive
As Matt Tyrnauer’s sexy documentary “Scotty and the Secret History of Hollywood” hits theaters in New York and L.A., returning gregarious 95-year-old Scotty Bowers to the Big Apple for the first time since the ’60s, documentarian Matt Tyrnauer and his producing partner Corey Reeser of Altimeter Films have pacted with Fox Searchlight to produce a biopic about the notorious gay matchmaker’s unique point-of-view on the sex life of Hollywood movie stars. No director or writer are yet attached.

Some would call the ex-Marine a pimp. The tousle-haired author of scandalous 2012 memoir “Full Service: My Adventures in Hollywood and the Secret Sex Lives of the Stars” put gay people together via a Hollywood gas station for rendezvous with celluloid luminaries, from Charles Laughton to Walter Pidgeon. Of course, Bowers wrote his Hollywood tell-all after the marquee names were all dead.

While it isn’t news that director George Cukor
See full article at Thompson on Hollywood »

Fox Searchlight Backs Scotty Bowers Biopic Based on Sexy Tell-All Memoir — Exclusive

Fox Searchlight Backs Scotty Bowers Biopic Based on Sexy Tell-All Memoir — Exclusive
As Matt Tyrnauer’s sexy documentary “Scotty and the Secret History of Hollywood” hits theaters in New York and L.A., returning gregarious 95-year-old Scotty Bowers to the Big Apple for the first time since the ’60s, documentarian Matt Tyrnauer and his producing partner Corey Reeser of Altimeter Films have pacted with Fox Searchlight to produce a biopic about the notorious gay matchmaker’s unique point-of-view on the sex life of Hollywood movie stars. No director or writer are yet attached.

Some would call the ex-Marine a pimp. The tousle-haired author of scandalous 2012 memoir “Full Service: My Adventures in Hollywood and the Secret Sex Lives of the Stars” put gay people together via a Hollywood gas station for rendezvous with celluloid luminaries, from Charles Laughton to Walter Pidgeon. Of course, Bowers wrote his Hollywood tell-all after the marquee names were all dead.

While it isn’t news that director George Cukor
See full article at Indiewire »

‘Timeless’ Embraces Costumes for the Ages, from Glam Hepburn to Abolitionist Tubman

‘Timeless’ Embraces Costumes for the Ages, from Glam Hepburn to Abolitionist Tubman
The second and final season of “Timeless,” NBC’s time travel drama, embraces more inclusion and diversity, including encounters with abolitionist Harriet Tubman, suffragist Alice Paul, and blues musician Robert Johnson. This greatly expanded the challenges and opportunities for costume designer Mari-An Ceo, who especially enjoyed “Hollywoodland,” in which she got to recreate Katherine Hepburn’s lavish Greek goddess gown from “The Philadelphia Story” for star Abigail Spencer.

“The stories shifted and became more evolved [this season], but this was one of my favorites,” Ceo said. “Going into Hollywood, it felt like we were making a movie and dressed all the people that worked on movies. We made hundreds of background costumes. We were on the Paramount lot and, finally, we were shooting where the place actually was supposed to be.”

In “Hollywoodland,” the Lifeboat team of Lucy, Wyatt (Matt Lanter), and Rufus (Malcolm Barrett) travel to 1941 Hollywood to retrieve the stolen
See full article at Indiewire »

DVD Review – A Bill of Divorcement (1932)

A Bill of Divorcement, 1932.

Directed by George Cukor.

Starring John Barrymore, Katherine Hepburn, and Billie Burke.

Synopsis:

After regaining his sanity and escaping an asylum to be with her, Hilary returns home Christmas day to learn that his wife has divorced him.

It’s Christmas Eve at the Fairfield home and love is in the air. Margaret Fairfield has divorced her husband. Her new beau, Gray (Paul Cavanagh), wants to get married. Her daughter, Sydney (Katherine Hepburn), is sneaking off with her boyfriend, Kit (David Manners), and getting engaged. If it weren’t for Aunt Hester (Elizabeth Patterson) they might not think about Margaret’s first husband, Hilary (John Barrymore), at all, but Hester doesn’t recognize the divorce as final and when Hilary shows up on Christmas Day, having run away from the asylum, it falls on Margaret to bring him up to speed on what’s changed.

Originally
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

‘Set It Up’ Filmmakers on How They Brought the Rom-Com Into the Modern Age

  • Variety
‘Set It Up’ Filmmakers on How They Brought the Rom-Com Into the Modern Age
While romantic comedies ruled the box office in the ’80s, ’90s, and early 2000s, the past few years have been rough for fans of the genre. But viewers found a bright spot recently with Netflix’s buzzy film “Set It Up.”

Starring Zoey Deutch, Glen Powell, Lucy Liu, and Taye Diggs, the story of two overworked New York assistants who set up their high-maintenance bosses in an attempt to get some free time and end up — surprise! — falling in love themselves has become a hit for the streamer, and provided a modern twist on the familiar rom-com conventions.

In their race to greenlight superhero tentpoles and sequels, studios haven’t been big on producing original romantic comedies. “The Big Sick” showed there’s an appetite for a different approach to the genre, but 2015’s “Trainwreck” is the only rom-com to gross over $50 million in the past six years. But original
See full article at Variety »

‘The Awful Truth’ Blu-ray Review (Criterion)

Stars: Cary Grant, Irene Dunne, Ralph Bellamy, Cecil Cunningham, Armand Duvalle | Written by Viña Delmar | Directed by Leo McCarey

Cary Grant plays Jerry Warriner, a New York socialite who’s just returned from a Florida vacation. We meet him bragging in the locker room: “What wives don’t know won’t hurt them!” Jerry’s Wife, Lucy (Irene Dunne), has also been away, supposedly to visit her aunt. So why has she strolled in with a handsome French gentleman? Jerry’s jealousy – not to mention his double standards – sends him into a fit of rage. They argue and Lucy files for divorce.

The rest of the film covers the months before the divorce goes through, as Lucy meets a new suitor and Jerry can’t leave her alone, always finding a reason to gatecrash her life. It’s the proto-rom-com stalker setup, although lovesick Lucy winds up behaving just as badly.
See full article at Blogomatic3000 »

Who’s your favorite Best Actress Oscar winner of the 1980s: Meryl Streep, Katharine Hepburn, Cher … ? [Poll]

Who’s your favorite Best Actress Oscar winner of the 1980s: Meryl Streep, Katharine Hepburn, Cher … ? [Poll]
The 1980s saw several legendary dames winning Best Actress at the Oscars, including academy favorites like Katharine Hepburn and Meryl Streep. The entire decade was a good one for women dominating their films, like Sissy Spacek, Shirley MacLaine, Sally Field, Geraldine Page, Cher and Jodie Foster. The ’80s also set records that still stand today, with Marlee Matlin being the youngest Best Actress winner at age 21 and Jessica Tandy being the oldest winner at 80.

So which Best Actress winner from the ’80s is your favorite? Look back on each of their performances and vote in our poll below.

Sissy Spacek, “Coal Miner’s Daughter” (1980) — The ’80s began with Spacek earning her Oscar for playing country music star Loretta Lynn in the biopic “Coal Miner’s Daughter.” Spacek earned a previous nomination for “Carrie” (1976) and four subsequent nominations, for: “Missing” (1982), “The River” (1984), “Crimes of the Heart” (1986) and “In the Bedroom” (2001).

SEE
See full article at Gold Derby »

Timeless Photos: Lucy and Wyatt Get Close During Old Hollywood Time Trip

Timeless Photos: Lucy and Wyatt Get Close During Old Hollywood Time Trip
You know that Lucy and Wyatt kiss in the Timeless Season 2 trailer? A batch of newly released photos appears to offer a first look at the sexually charged lead-up to that smooch.

In the March 25 episode (NBC, 10/9c), titled “Hollywoodland,” the Time Team travels to the backlot of Paramount Studios circa the early 1940s to stop Rittenhouse from stealing the classic film Citizen Kane. To fit in with the glamorous crowd, which includes actress/inventor Hedy Lamarr (VikingsAlyssa Sutherland), “Wyatt and Lucy go undercover as the next big musical duo,” star Abigail Spencer previously shared with TVLine. “[Rufus is] a playwright-turned-big screenwriter,
See full article at TVLine.com »

The Forgotten: James Whale's Zip-up Straitjacket

  • MUBI
The Impatient Maiden (1932) is an almost entirely overlooked film, and it's easy to see why, falling as it does between Frankenstein (1931) and The Old Dark House (1932) in director James Whale's Universal career. Those two films are important classics of the horror field, whereas Maiden is a modest romantic comedy that probably nobody had any particular hopes for. Still, as some of Whale's other, lesser-known movies are getting more attention (The Road Back has been restored, and Whale's own favorite film, By Candlelight, has had recent revivals; I'd like to see more attention paid to The Great Garrick and The Man in the Iron Mask) this one might reward attention—or at least I supposed so.How it came into the world: Universal had bought the novel The Impatient Virgin as a vehicle for fading star Clara Bow, who promptly rejected it. The censors mandated a change of title, despite
See full article at MUBI »

The Philadelphia Story Starring Katherine Hepburn, Cary Grant, Jimmy Stewart Back in Theaters February 18th & 21st

“Where’s my wandering parakeet?”

Love is in the air as Fathom Events and the TCM Big Screen Classics series present one of movie history’s quintessential romantic comedies: 1940’s The Philadelphia Story, in movie theaters nationwide for two days only on Sunday, February 18, and Wednesday, February 21. TCM Primetime Host Ben Mankiewicz will offer newly produced commentary before and after each presentation.

In one of her most famous roles, Katharine Hepburn plays Tracy Lord, the daughter of a well-to-do Pennsylvania family who is about to embark on a second marriage, this time to staid-but-wealthy George Kittredge (John Howard). As the wedding plans get underway, Tracy’s first husband C.K. Dexter Haven (Cary Grant) shows up at the house, in part to shield Tracy from the prying eyes of an overly ambitious reporter (James Stewart) assigned to cover the nuptials. Produced by Joseph L. Mankiewicz and directed by George Cukor,
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »
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