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The Long Voyage Home (1940)

Approved | | Drama, War | 22 November 1940 (USA)
A merchant ship's crew tries to survive the loneliness of the sea and the coming of war.

Director:

John Ford

Writers:

Eugene O'Neill (based on: four Sea Plays by), Dudley Nichols (adapted for the screen by)
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Nominated for 6 Oscars. Another 3 wins & 1 nomination. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
John Wayne ... Olsen
Thomas Mitchell ... Driscoll
Ian Hunter ... Smitty
Barry Fitzgerald ... Cocky
Wilfrid Lawson ... Captain (as Wilfred Lawson)
John Qualen ... Axel
Mildred Natwick ... Freda
Ward Bond ... Yank
Arthur Shields ... Donkeyman
Joe Sawyer ... Davis (as Joseph Sawyer)
J.M. Kerrigan ... Crimp
Rafaela Ottiano ... Bella
Carmen Morales Carmen Morales ... Principal Spanish Girl
Jack Pennick ... Johnny
Bob Perry Bob Perry ... Paddy (as Bob E. Perry)
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Storyline

Aboard the freighter Glencairn, the lives of the crew are lived out in fear, loneliness, suspicion and cameraderie. The men smuggle drink and women aboard, fight with each other, spy on each other, comfort each other as death approaches, and rescue each other from danger. Written by Jim Beaver <jumblejim@prodigy.net>

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

The searing loves and primitive hatreds of the men who live by the sea! (1948 reissue poster) See more »

Genres:

Drama | War

Certificate:

Approved | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

This film's opening prologue states: "With their hates and desires men are changing the face of the earth - but they cannot change the Sea. Men who live on the Sea never change - for they live in a lonely world apart as they drift from one rusty tramp steamer to the next, forging the life-lines of Nations -." See more »

Goofs

Aboard the Amindra the deck cargo of oil drums sound empty and move around during the fight. In addition they are not lashed down with cargo netting making them a hazard to the ship and crew if they sail through rough seas. See more »

Quotes

Donkeyman: Best thing to do with memories is... forget em.
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Connections

Referenced in Five Came Back: The Mission Begins (2017) See more »

Soundtracks

Rule Britannia
(uncredited)
Music by Thomas Augustine Arne
Words by James Thomson (1740)
Played as background music when the Union Jack is flown
See more »

User Reviews

 
Nice blend of O'Neill, Nichols, and a touch of Ford
12 May 2006 | by bkoganbingSee all my reviews

The Long Voyage Home is a compilation film of four one act plays by Eugene O'Neill who some will argue is America's greatest dramatist. The man who did the stitching together of O'Neill's work about the crew of the S.S. Glencairn is Dudley Nichols and presiding over it all is the direction of John Ford.

Mr. Ford is usually someone who really puts an individual stamp on one of his movies. But the usual Ford trademarks are noticeably absent from The Long Voyage Home. Probably in mood and style the film of Ford's this comes closest to is The Informer. In fact J.M. Kerrigan is playing almost the same part in this as he did in The Informer.

One thing Ford always did was use the right kind of music to set the tone for a film. Those 19th century ballads like I Dream of Jeannie that work so well in something like Stagecoach are substituted for Harbor Lights. That song expresses so well the longing of a whole bunch of rootless men to find some kind of stability in their lives.

Eugene O'Neill spent many years at sea and the characters of these men on the S.S. Glencairn are drawn from his own youthful experience. Most of our planet is covered by water and no country owns it. It's just called the high seas and the seamen on it are an international fraternity, like the S.S. Glencairn crew. I've always felt that O'Neill was trying to say that if there's any salvation to be had in this old world, it's to be found on the salt water. It's the only place where all kinds of people really work for a common goal, stay alive and make the trip.

The original plays had a World War I background, but it has been updated for World War II. Especially in the part when the crew becomes convinced that Ian Hunter is some kind of spy. Certainly the second World War in 1940 gave the audiences some real interest. Ian Hunter may have given his career performance in this as Smitty. Turns out he's far from what everyone suspects.

Hard to believe that John Wayne would be in a film by one of our greatest dramatists. But the Duke holds his own in the ensemble. It's the only time he ever attempted some kind of accent and he pulls it off. But I'm sure he thought once was enough.

Wayne as Olsen is the innocent of the group, maybe the only time he's ever been that on the screen. The rest of the crew makes every effort to see he does in fact get home to Sweden. It turns out to cost one of them his life ultimately.

If you're any kind of depressed, The Long Voyage Home or any Eugene O'Neill is not good for your mental health. He's one pessimistic fellow that O'Neill. But his insights into our character and soul are always penetrating as they are in The Long Voyage Home.


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Details

Country:

USA

Language:

English | Spanish

Release Date:

22 November 1940 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

Eugene O'Neill's The Long Voyage Home See more »

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Box Office

Budget:

$682,495 (estimated)
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Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Mono (Western Electric Mirrophonic Recording)

Aspect Ratio:

1.37 : 1
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