American Experience (1988– )
7.9/10
95
6 user

Influenza 1918 

The great influenza pandemic of 1918 - the worst epidemic ever seen in the United States.

Director:

Robert Kenner

Writer:

Ken Chowder
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Cast

Episode credited cast:
Alfred Crosby Alfred Crosby ... Himself (as Dr. Alfred Crosby)
John De Lano John De Lano ... Himself
Shirley Fannin Shirley Fannin ... Herself (as Dr. Shirley Fannin)
Cathryn Guyler Cathryn Guyler ... Herself
Linda Hunt ... Narrator
William Maxwell William Maxwell ... Himself
Anna Milani Anna Milani ... Herself
Porter Reading Porter Reading ... Himself
Lee Reay Lee Reay ... Himself
Barbara Rosencrantz Barbara Rosencrantz ... Herself (as Dr. Barbara Rosencrantz)
William Sardo William Sardo ... Himself
Daniel Tonkel Daniel Tonkel ... Himself
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Storyline

The great influenza pandemic of 1918 - the worst epidemic ever seen in the United States.

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Details

Official Sites:

The American Experience

Country:

USA

Language:

English

Release Date:

9 February 1998 (USA) See more »

Company Credits

Production Co:

Robert Kenner Films, WGBH See more »
Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Stereo

Aspect Ratio:

1.33 : 1
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User Reviews

Dated documentary on timely subject
14 December 2009 | by SanFernandoCurtSee all my reviews

With the H1N1 flu virus grabbing so much attention this year, this fascinating though inaccurate look back at the "killer flu" of 1918 is particularly interesting, especially since H1N1 probably was the viral platform from which the unique 1918 pandemic sprang. The film places the origin of the virus on a Midwest U.S. Army base, although that theory has since been junked. (There were apparent cases of the strain in Siberia and China as early as spring 1917.) While the documentary's science is dodgy, its account of the devastation is sobering: Main Street America lined with piles of coffins, emergency workers wearing surgical masks on the street, and so on. Virology was in a primitive state 90 years ago, and some of the ghastly "treatments" sound as awful as the ailment itself. Medical science was woefully incapable of dealing with a flu that found victims "healthy at breakfast and dead by supper-time".

The pandemic came as tragic epilogue to World War I, and latest research indicates the still-mysterious mutation may have developed its lethal virulence in the septic killing fields of Europe's Western Front; it killed 600,000 Americans and left a worldwide death toll some estimates hold as high as 50 million. Also interesting, in reflection, is how utterly forgotten the pandemic remained until our present day emergency; since there was no one to blame, the influenza had no political traction, and thus has not been memorialized in our social discourse like other catastrophes real and hysterically imagined. The once-named "Spanish flu" remains a lethal phantasm, perhaps unremembered, but lurking always.


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