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Salute to Classics Pays Tribute to Film Luminaries

Salute to Classics Pays Tribute to Film Luminaries
Celebrating its 10th anniversary this year, the Lumière Film Festival in Lyon, France, has cemented its position as a favorite event for generations of leading international filmmakers with its showcase of classic films and tributes to legendary cinematic heroes.

Launched in 2009 by Bertrand Tavernier and Cannes topper Thierry Frémaux, the president and director of the Institut Lumière, respectively, the event has become one of the largest international festivals of classic cinema.

Last year 171,000 festivalgoers attended, up from 160,500 in 2016.

This year’s honorees and guests at the event, running Oct. 13-21, include such luminaries as Jane Fonda, who is receiving the Lumière Award, Peter Bogdanovich, Stephen Frears, Liv Ullmann, Javier Bardem and Jerry Schatzberg.

In addition to a retrospective of her work that will include such films as “Coming Home,” “The China Syndrome,” “Klute” and “On Golden Pond,” Fonda will bring the festival to a close with a tribute to her father,
See full article at Variety »

Oscar Flashback: The 11 films that scored two of the Big Five, including ‘The Philadelphia Story,’ ‘La La Land’

Oscar Flashback: The 11 films that scored two of the Big Five, including ‘The Philadelphia Story,’ ‘La La Land’
This article marks Part 3 of the Gold Derby series reflecting on films that contended for the Big Five Oscars – Best Picture, Best Director, Best Actor, Best Actress and Best Screenplay (Original or Adapted). With “A Star Is Born” this year on the cusp of joining this exclusive group of Oscar favorites, join us as we look back at the 43 extraordinary pictures that earned Academy Awards nominations in each of the Big Five categories, including the following 11 films that scored a pair of prizes among the top races.

At the 4th Academy Awards ceremony, “Cimarron” (1931) made Oscar history as the first motion picture to ever score nominations in the Big Five categories. On the big night, the western took home the top prize in Best Picture, as well as the Oscar in Best Adapted Screenplay (Howard Estabrook). Not as successful were the picture’s director, Wesley Ruggles, topped by Norman Taurog (“Skippy”), and the leads,
See full article at Gold Derby »

Oscar Flashback: The 11 films that won one of the Big Five, including ‘Sunset Boulevard,’ ‘Chinatown’

Oscar Flashback: The 11 films that won one of the Big Five, including ‘Sunset Boulevard,’ ‘Chinatown’
This article marks Part 2 of the Gold Derby series reflecting on films that contended for the Big Five Oscars – Best Picture, Best Director, Best Actor, Best Actress and Best Screenplay (Original or Adapted). With “A Star Is Born” this year on the cusp of joining this exclusive group of Oscar favorites, join us as we look back at the 43 extraordinary pictures that earned Academy Awards nominations in each of the Big Five categories, including the following 11 films that scored a single prize among the top races.

More than eight decades prior to Bradley Cooper’s take on the timeless tale, the first “A Star Is Born” (1937), headlined by Fredric March and Janet Gaynor, became the third motion picture, following “Cimarron” (1931) and “It Happened One Night” (1934), to earn nominations in the Big Five Oscar categories.

At the 10th Academy Awards ceremony, however, neither March nor Gaynor emerged triumphant, losing in their
See full article at Gold Derby »

‘A Star Is Born’: Bradley Cooper and Lady Gaga to make Oscar history?

‘A Star Is Born’: Bradley Cooper and Lady Gaga to make Oscar history?
Over the 90-years of Oscar history, seven films have scored wins in both Best Actor and Best Actress on the big night. This year could see, for the first time in more than two decades, an eighth join this exclusive group of Oscar favorites.

A Star Is Born” proved the toast of the Telluride, Toronto and Venice Film Festivals, earning critical raves that favorably compared it to the three prior eponymous films, from 1937, 1954 and 1976. Stars Bradley Cooper and Lady Gaga have been lauded for their turns in the film and now lead in Gold Derby’s odds in Best Actor and Best Actress.

With Fredric March and Janet Gaynor earning Oscar nominations for the 1937 original and James Mason and Judy Garland having garnered recognition for the 1954 musical remake, Cooper and Gaga are well-positioned to at least score nominations for the latest version. Should both prevail, “A Star Is Born” will
See full article at Gold Derby »

Toronto Film Review: ‘The Public’

  • Variety
Toronto Film Review: ‘The Public’
In the U.S., homeless populations have increasingly turned for daytime shelter to public libraries, which provide not just relief from the elements and a relatively safe, calm environment, but also internet access that may be the only available means of job/housing networking or long-distance communication for most of them. Their presence is an annoyance to some, and a frequent trial to staff — but so far no one has tried to revoke general access to this last bastion of free indoor public space. (But give them time.)

Emilio Estevez’s “The Public” savvily deploys this circumstance for a commentary on up-to-the-moment social issues that’s also a curiously old-fashioned, uplifting dramedy redolent of Frank Capra and William Saroyan. With the writer-director himself as a classic fed-up Average Joe who leads a crew of lovable misfits (i.e. homeless people) in a largely comic rebellion against The Man, this somewhat anachronistic,
See full article at Variety »

Revisiting Hours: ‘Dogville’ and Our Great American Nightmare

Every Friday, we’re recommending an older movie that’s available to stream or download and worth seeing again through the lens of our current moment. We’re calling the series “Revisiting Hours” — consider this Rolling Stone’s unofficial film club. First up: Tim Grierson on Lars von Trier’s warped Our-Town-through-a-glass-darkly parable Dogville.

“This is the sad tale of the township of Dogville.” With those words, spoken by off-screen narrator John Hurt, writer-director Lars von Trier introduced us to a community (and a movie) that invited audiences to project
See full article at Rolling Stone »

Alfred Hitchcock movies: 25 greatest films, ranked worst to best, include ‘Vertigo,’ ‘Psycho,’ ‘North by Northwest’

  • Gold Derby
Alfred Hitchcock movies: 25 greatest films, ranked worst to best, include ‘Vertigo,’ ‘Psycho,’ ‘North by Northwest’
Alfred Hitchcock celebrates his 119th birthday on August 13. Born in 1899, the director has long been revered as one of the most influential filmmakers of all time. He also holds the unfortunate distinction of being one of Oscar’s biggest losers, with five Best Director nominations and no wins. Still, who needs an Oscar when you’ve impacted world cinema as significantly as “Hitch” has? In honor of his birthday, let’s take a look back at 25 of his greatest films, ranked from worst to best.

Known as “the Master of Suspense,” Hitchcock cut his teeth directing silent movies in his native England. With films like “The Lodger” (1927), he gained a reputation for helming tense and stylish psychological thrillers. With the invention of sound came an added element to Hitchcock’s work: a sly sense of humor.

He moved to America in 1940 to direct two films that earned Best Picture nominations: “Foreign Correspondent” and “Rebecca,
See full article at Gold Derby »

Alfred Hitchcock movies: 25 greatest films ranked from worst to best

  • Gold Derby
Alfred Hitchcock movies: 25 greatest films ranked from worst to best
Alfred Hitchcock celebrates his 119th birthday on August 13. Born in 1899, the director has long been revered as one of the most influential filmmakers of all time. He also holds the unfortunate distinction of being one of Oscar’s biggest losers, with five Best Director nominations and no wins. Still, who needs an Oscar when you’ve impacted world cinema as significantly as “Hitch” has? In honor of his birthday, let’s take a look back at 25 of his greatest films, ranked from worst to best.

Known as “the Master of Suspense,” Hitchcock cut his teeth directing silent movies in his native England. With films like “The Lodger” (1927), he gained a reputation for helming tense and stylish psychological thrillers. With the invention of sound came an added element to Hitchcock’s work: a sly sense of humor.

He moved to America in 1940 to direct two films that earned Best Picture nominations: “Foreign Correspondent” and “Rebecca,
See full article at Gold Derby »

Jane Fonda Comes to Capitol Hill to Press for Rights for Women in the Working Class

  • Variety
Jane Fonda Comes to Capitol Hill to Press for Rights for Women in the Working Class
Washington — In one part of the Capitol on Thursday, Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh was meeting with more senators as he faces a contentious confirmation hearing. In another, the House was holding a circus-like hearing with FBI agent Peter Strzok.

In a basement meeting room of the Capitol Visitor Center, there also was a lot of media interest: Jane Fonda, the star of Netflix’s “Frankie & Johnnie” and the longtime political activist, was pressing lawmakers to expand protections for women domestic workers and farmworkers.

One of her messages: The MeToo and Times Up movement is an opportunity for Hollywood to call attention to women in other industries who face pay inequity and sexual harassment.

“We are here with the domestic workers and the women farmworkers and, as has been said, these women, often women of color, often migrants, immigrants, are very, very vulnerable and they work in a very isolated
See full article at Variety »

Bruce Springsteen Condemns Trump’s ‘Inhumane’ Border Policy During Broadway Show

  • Variety
Bruce Springsteen Condemns Trump’s ‘Inhumane’ Border Policy During Broadway Show
Bruce Springsteen broke from the scripted set of his ongoing “Springsteen on Broadway” show Tuesday night to slam the “inhumane” treatment of the children who have been separated from their families at the Mexican border by the Trump administration’s immigration policies.

After speaking in support of the pro-gun control March for Our Lives, the singer told the audience at the Walter Kerr Theatre, “It was a good day, and a necessary day because we are seeing things right now on our American borders that are so shockingly and disgracefully inhumane and un-American that it is simply enraging. And we have heard people in high position in the American government blaspheme in the name of God and country that it is a moral thing to assault the children amongst us. May God save our souls.

“For 146 shows, I have played pretty much the same set every night,” Springsteen concluded. “Tonight demands something different.
See full article at Variety »

California Split: Who Would Get Custody Of The Golden State Movies If Ballot Measure Passes?

  • Deadline
California Split: Who Would Get Custody Of The Golden State Movies If Ballot Measure Passes?
I already had a headache from fretting about the ballot measure to split California. Who gets the water? What happens to Prop 13? Where’s Yosemite? Can we still repeal the gas tax? Are the prisons in one state, the criminals in another? What about the bullet train? How do we divvy up Jerry Brown’s legacy?

Then I came up against a bigger worry: Who gets the movies?

I don’t mean the studios, such as they are in the 21st century. Those are mostly in Los Angeles, so they would be in the rump “California,” not in the newly named “Southern California,” which would include some inland counties and everything south of L.A. (including San Diego Comic-Con), nor “Northern California,” which gets all that stuff above a line that runs roughly from Monterey to Fresno.

And there’s no point quibbling about the tab for film incentives. It’s just a renegotiation.
See full article at Deadline »

Mother’s Day: Top 18 best Oscar-winning mom performances ranked, including Shirley MacLaine, Brie Larson

  • Gold Derby
Mother’s Day: Top 18 best Oscar-winning mom performances ranked, including Shirley MacLaine, Brie Larson
How would you like to spend a special Mother’s Day with your Mom? Here’s a suggestion — why not sit down for a couple of hours and watch one of these movies that’s all about mothers, both terrific and horrible? Our ranked photo gallery above includes many fine suggestions, all of which feature an Oscar-winning performance by an actress who plays a mother where that role was pivotal to the plot.

Though there are thousands of films in which one character happens to be a mother, you won’t find them all on this list. Besides the fact that these 18 films contain a maternal performance that won an Academy Award, they show a wide array of what it means to be a mother. There’s the courageous mother, the inspirational mom, the loving mother and even the monstrous mother. Lead and supporting actresses include Shirley MacLaine, Frances McDormand,
See full article at Gold Derby »

Mother’s Day: Top 18 Best Oscar-Winning Mom Performances Ranked

  • Gold Derby
Mother’s Day: Top 18 Best Oscar-Winning Mom Performances Ranked
How would you like to spend a special Mother’s Day with your Mom? Here’s a suggestion — why not sit down for a couple of hours and watch one of these movies that’s all about mothers, both terrific and horrible? Our ranked photo gallery above includes many fine suggestions, all of which feature an Oscar-winning performance by an actress who plays a mother where that role was pivotal to the plot.

Though there are thousands of films in which one character happens to be a mother, you won’t find them all on this list. Besides the fact that these 18 films contain a maternal performance that won an Academy Award, they show a wide array of what it means to be a mother. There’s the courageous mother, the inspirational mom, the loving mother and even the monstrous mother. Lead and supporting actresses include Shirley MacLaine, Frances McDormand,
See full article at Gold Derby »

20th Century Fox Gets Emotional In Powerful Show As Much About Its Past As It Was About The Future – CinemaCon

  • Deadline
Did CinemaCon save the best for (nearly) the last? In terms of the movies on display we’ll have to wait and see, but in terms of pure emotion I would have to guess there wasn’t a dry eye in Caesars Palace’s Colosseum at this morning’s richly nostalgic, proud and perhaps bittersweet presentation from 20th Century Fox that could — if and when the proposed Disney merger is approved — be the last the iconic studio ever does on of these on its own here as one of Hollywood’s storied six majors.

Afterwards in the lobby, it was hard to find a Fox staffer without tears still in their eyes. Yes, there was the usual slate tubthumping, and a few star and filmmaker appearances (though much lighter compared to what the other studios sans Disney have done here in that regard), but this presentation brilliantly masterminded by Fox
See full article at Deadline »

‘Bohemian Rhapsody’: Rami Malek’s Freddie Mercury Footage Stuns Cinemacon, but Without a Director

This winter, 20th Century Fox’s Freddie Mercury biopic “Bohemian Rhapsody” became a calamity. Director Bryan Singer reportedly clashed with star Rami Malek, halting production by going Mia from the London set after Thanksgiving. Singer’s firing was announced December 5, two days before he was hit with his latest sexual assault lawsuit, from a man who claims he was victimized as a teen.

Yet replacement director Dexter Fletcher (“Eddie the Eagle”) must have restored the studio’s faith: The film’s Christmas 2018 release date was moved up seven weeks, and the musical was a showpiece of its Las Vegas CinemaCon presentation. However, not only was there no mention of Singer, Fox also ignored Fletcher — staying silent on the film’s director at all, much less who will receive final credit.

Nevertheless, Fox is so confident in the finished product that, in a tribute to its 83-year-history, it included a shot
See full article at Indiewire »

Breakout ‘Isle of Dogs’ Dominates Feast or Famine Specialty Box Office

Breakout ‘Isle of Dogs’ Dominates Feast or Famine Specialty Box Office
Wes Anderson’s “Isle of Dogs” (Fox Searchlight) showed crossover strength as it widened on its second weekend to more major markets. And “Death of Stalin” (IFC) continues strong on the arthouse circuit.

Both added a much-needed boost to the anemic specialty market. Only three holdovers after their third week grossed over $50,000, including the final dates for Oscar-winner “The Shape of Water.” This marks the lowest numbers in years, and exposes the feast-or-famine nature of the current specialized box office.

The widest new opener, Roadside Attraction’s British senior romance “Finding Your Feet,” drew a mixed response in multiple initial cities.

Of the three new U.S. indies arriving with past festival branding, only Gemini (Neon) has a chance at real theatrical legs; “Love After Love” (IFC) is already streaming, and “Outside In” (The Orchard) hits Svod on April 3 before Netflix availability on June 1. The theatrical business is shifting: only
See full article at Indiewire »

Martin Scorsese Unveils 38-Film Curriculum Surveying Democracy in American Cinema

Recently completing one of the longest shoots of his career with The Irishman, most other directors would consider that an accomplishment enough, but in between takes, Martin Scorsese somehow found time to construct a new curriculum as part of his “The Story of Movies” film course, produced with his company Film Foundation. This latest edition is “Portraits of America: Democracy on Film” and is free for students. However, if one would just like to follow along with their own personal screenings, the full list is available.

“We all need to make sense of what we’re seeing. For young people born into this world now, it’s absolutely crucial that they get guided,” Scorsese says (via IndieWire). “They have to learn how to sort the differences between art and pure commerce, between cinema and content, between the secrets of images that are individually crafted and the secrets of images that are mass-produced.
See full article at The Film Stage »

Martin Scorsese’s New Film Course: ‘Portraits of America’ Teaches Democracy Through Chaplin, Coppola, and More

Martin Scorsese’s New Film Course: ‘Portraits of America’ Teaches Democracy Through Chaplin, Coppola, and More
Martin Scorsese and his nonprofit organization The Film Foundation have announced their brand-new film curriculum, “Portraits of America: Democracy on Film.” The curriculum is the latest addition to the group’s ongoing film course “The Story of Movies,” which aims to teach students how to read the language of film and place motion pictures in the context of history, art, and society. Both “Democracy on Film” and the course are completely free for schools and universities.

“Portraits of America: Democracy on Film” is broken down into eight different sections, all of which include in-depth looks at some of the most important American films ever made, from Chaplin to Ford, Coppola, Spielberg, and ultimately Scorsese himself. The program is presented in partnership with Afscme. Scorsese announced the curriculum at a March 27 press conference in New York City.

“We all need to make sense of what we’re seeing,” Scorsese explained. “For
See full article at Indiewire »

Who’s your favorite Best Actor Oscar winner of 1980s: Daniel Day-Lewis, Robert De Niro, Michael Douglas … ? [Poll]

Who’s your favorite Best Actor Oscar winner of 1980s: Daniel Day-Lewis, Robert De Niro, Michael Douglas … ? [Poll]
The Best Actor Oscar winners of the 1980s are some of Hollywood’s most beloved acting legends. We saw icons of yesteryear finally winning their first Oscar, like Henry Fonda and Paul Newman, in addition to actors who have endured through decades of film, like Robert De Niro, Ben Kingsley, Robert Duvall, Michael Douglas, Dustin Hoffman and Daniel Day-Lewis. The decade also saw newer stars like F. Murray Abraham and William Hurt step into the spotlight and launch lasting careers of their own.

Who is your favorite Best Actor Oscar winner of the 1980s? Look back on each performance and be sure to vote in our poll below.

Robert De Niro, “Raging Bull” (1980) — The ’80s started off with one of the most memorable performances in movie history — De Niro as troubled boxer Jake Lamotta in “Raging Bull.” De Niro won Best Supporting Actor five years earlier for “The Godfather Part
See full article at Gold Derby »

Where do the most recent group of Academy Award winners rank all time?

As we begin to fully focus on 2018 releases and eventually what the 2019 awards season will be like, a little more about the most recent Oscars is still required. Mainly, a look at how the winners stack up with previous ones. This time around, I’m tying in all of the major categories together. Yes, all eight of the top prizes will get a rundown today, with the possibility of another piece next week on the technical categories. For now, it’s Picture, Director, the four Acting slots, and both Screenplay categories, which is more than enough to start with. This is going to be fun. Like I mentioned above, before we get to Best Picture, which is clearly the big one, quickly I’d like to run down some of the other categories and how they stack up. That way, it’s more of a broader collection. Obviously, we know
See full article at Hollywoodnews.com »
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