The Grapes of Wrath (1940) - News Poster

News

Breakout ‘Isle of Dogs’ Dominates Feast or Famine Specialty Box Office

Breakout ‘Isle of Dogs’ Dominates Feast or Famine Specialty Box Office
Wes Anderson’s “Isle of Dogs” (Fox Searchlight) showed crossover strength as it widened on its second weekend to more major markets. And “Death of Stalin” (IFC) continues strong on the arthouse circuit.

Both added a much-needed boost to the anemic specialty market. Only three holdovers after their third week grossed over $50,000, including the final dates for Oscar-winner “The Shape of Water.” This marks the lowest numbers in years, and exposes the feast-or-famine nature of the current specialized box office.

The widest new opener, Roadside Attraction’s British senior romance “Finding Your Feet,” drew a mixed response in multiple initial cities.

Of the three new U.S. indies arriving with past festival branding, only Gemini (Neon) has a chance at real theatrical legs; “Love After Love” (IFC) is already streaming, and “Outside In” (The Orchard) hits Svod on April 3 before Netflix availability on June 1. The theatrical business is shifting: only
See full article at Indiewire »

Martin Scorsese Unveils 38-Film Curriculum Surveying Democracy in American Cinema

Recently completing one of the longest shoots of his career with The Irishman, most other directors would consider that an accomplishment enough, but in between takes, Martin Scorsese somehow found time to construct a new curriculum as part of his “The Story of Movies” film course, produced with his company Film Foundation. This latest edition is “Portraits of America: Democracy on Film” and is free for students. However, if one would just like to follow along with their own personal screenings, the full list is available.

“We all need to make sense of what we’re seeing. For young people born into this world now, it’s absolutely crucial that they get guided,” Scorsese says (via IndieWire). “They have to learn how to sort the differences between art and pure commerce, between cinema and content, between the secrets of images that are individually crafted and the secrets of images that are mass-produced.
See full article at The Film Stage »

Martin Scorsese’s New Film Course: ‘Portraits of America’ Teaches Democracy Through Chaplin, Coppola, and More

Martin Scorsese’s New Film Course: ‘Portraits of America’ Teaches Democracy Through Chaplin, Coppola, and More
Martin Scorsese and his nonprofit organization The Film Foundation have announced their brand-new film curriculum, “Portraits of America: Democracy on Film.” The curriculum is the latest addition to the group’s ongoing film course “The Story of Movies,” which aims to teach students how to read the language of film and place motion pictures in the context of history, art, and society. Both “Democracy on Film” and the course are completely free for schools and universities.

“Portraits of America: Democracy on Film” is broken down into eight different sections, all of which include in-depth looks at some of the most important American films ever made, from Chaplin to Ford, Coppola, Spielberg, and ultimately Scorsese himself. The program is presented in partnership with Afscme. Scorsese announced the curriculum at a March 27 press conference in New York City.

“We all need to make sense of what we’re seeing,” Scorsese explained. “For
See full article at Indiewire »

Who’s your favorite Best Actor Oscar winner of 1980s: Daniel Day-Lewis, Robert De Niro, Michael Douglas … ? [Poll]

Who’s your favorite Best Actor Oscar winner of 1980s: Daniel Day-Lewis, Robert De Niro, Michael Douglas … ? [Poll]
The Best Actor Oscar winners of the 1980s are some of Hollywood’s most beloved acting legends. We saw icons of yesteryear finally winning their first Oscar, like Henry Fonda and Paul Newman, in addition to actors who have endured through decades of film, like Robert De Niro, Ben Kingsley, Robert Duvall, Michael Douglas, Dustin Hoffman and Daniel Day-Lewis. The decade also saw newer stars like F. Murray Abraham and William Hurt step into the spotlight and launch lasting careers of their own.

Who is your favorite Best Actor Oscar winner of the 1980s? Look back on each performance and be sure to vote in our poll below.

Robert De Niro, “Raging Bull” (1980) — The ’80s started off with one of the most memorable performances in movie history — De Niro as troubled boxer Jake Lamotta in “Raging Bull.” De Niro won Best Supporting Actor five years earlier for “The Godfather Part
See full article at Gold Derby »

Where do the most recent group of Academy Award winners rank all time?

As we begin to fully focus on 2018 releases and eventually what the 2019 awards season will be like, a little more about the most recent Oscars is still required. Mainly, a look at how the winners stack up with previous ones. This time around, I’m tying in all of the major categories together. Yes, all eight of the top prizes will get a rundown today, with the possibility of another piece next week on the technical categories. For now, it’s Picture, Director, the four Acting slots, and both Screenplay categories, which is more than enough to start with. This is going to be fun. Like I mentioned above, before we get to Best Picture, which is clearly the big one, quickly I’d like to run down some of the other categories and how they stack up. That way, it’s more of a broader collection. Obviously, we know
See full article at Hollywoodnews.com »

Chicano Resilience on Film

  • MUBI
Ela Bittencourt's column explores South America’s key festivals and notable screenings of Latin films in North America and Europe.El Norte“We need to see our experiences validated, otherwise we don’t exist. And if we don’t exist, we become diminished,” says Lourdes Portillo, the filmmaker behind Corpus: A Home Movie for Selena (1999), a documentary short that screens in the current Brooklyn Academy of Music (Bam) retrospective, "¡Sí Se Puede! Pioneers of Chicano Cinema", spanning Mexican-American films from the 1970s to the 90s, and focusing primarily on the Chicano community’s rising socio-political awareness.Urgent issues of representation ripple through the entire program. From Selena (1997), a biopic about a music star, Selena Quintanilla, directed by Gregory Nava and starring Jennifer Lopez, in which we watch Selena’s budding talent consistently protected and bolstered by her father’s loving yet adamant admonishing her to always “be who you are deep down,
See full article at MUBI »

Every Best Director winner in Oscars history: Welcome to the club, Guillermo del Toro (‘The Shape of Water’)

Every Best Director winner in Oscars history: Welcome to the club, Guillermo del Toro (‘The Shape of Water’)
On the 90th anniversary of the Oscars, Guillermo del Toro was finally welcomed into the Best Director club when he prevailed for his fantasy film “The Shape of Water.” Earlier this awards season del Toro told us that “The Shape of Water” was a “fairy tale for troubled times,” a reference to the movie’s heroine (Sally Hawkins) being a mute woman who falls in love with a sea creature. Besides winning Best Director, del Toro also accepted the prize for Best Picture as one of the film’s producers. Click through our photo gallery above to see our updated Best Director gallery featuring all 90 winners in order.

See 2018 Oscars: Complete list of winners (and losers)

Guillermo del Toro joins a list of former Best Director winners that notably includes his fellow Mexican director friends Alejandro G. Inarritu and Alfonso Cuaron. These three amigos have now won four of the
See full article at Gold Derby »

Will ‘The Shape of Water’ be the ninth Best Picture Oscar champ not to win any of its three-plus acting nominations?

Will ‘The Shape of Water’ be the ninth Best Picture Oscar champ not to win any of its three-plus acting nominations?
The Shape of Water” is one of two Best Picture Oscar nominees with three acting nominations — the other being “Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri” — but star Sally Hawkins and supporting players Octavia Spencer and Richard Jenkins are not predicted to win any of them. If they indeed go 0-3 on Sunday and “The Shape of Water” takes the top prize, the fantasy drama will join eight other Best Picture champs that did not convert any of its three-plus acting nominations into wins.

“Birdman” (2014) was the most recent Best Picture winner not to carry an acting award from at least three nominations, as Michael Keaton, Emma Stone and Edward Norton fell to Eddie Redmayne (“The Theory of Everything”), Patricia Arquette (“Boyhood”) and J.K. Simmons (“Whiplash”), respectively. Arquette and Simmons were the supporting frontrunners all season, but Keaton was locked in a tight Best Actor race with Redmayne until the SAG Awards
See full article at Gold Derby »

Yippee-ki-yay ya bawbag by Jennie Kermode

The weather outside is frightful... it's time for Die Hard Photo: Ingrid Mur

Day three at the Glasgow Film Festival began with a screening of John Ford’s The Grapes Of Wrath which went down a treat with audiences, including people seeing it for the first time. All of the films in the Rebel Heroes series are free, so as long as you’re in the area and not too hungover from the previous night’s festival fun to scrape yourself out of bed, they’re a great place to start the day. Much of the morning and afternoon is dedicated to second screenings of films shown in the evenings, which many people use to work around clashes (you might be surprised by how many people take holidays from work for the festival), and on Friday there was also a chance to see a local film, Which Way Up, which
See full article at eyeforfilm.co.uk »

Lady Bird review

Saorise Ronan stars in, and Greta Gerwig writes and directs, the Oscar-nominated Lady Bird. Here's our review...

There's a bit near the beginning of Lady Bird that has made it into most of the trailers, and also shown up in most of the awards shows in which it has been nominated this year, because it pops. That this clip is so much better in context says it all about Greta Gerwig's directorial debut, a coming-of-age comedy that plays the humdrum hometown blues magnificently from beginning to end.

The film opens mid-road trip, with 18-year-old Christine 'Lady Bird' McPherson (Saoirse Ronan) and her mother Marion (Laurie Metcalf) dabbing their eyes at the end of a marathon listen to The Grapes Of Wrath on tape. Both mother and daughter alike are moved by the hopeful final passage, but one wants to put some music on and the other wants to sit in silence and reflect.
See full article at Den of Geek »

Oscar Best Director gallery: All 89 winners from Damien Chazelle to Frank Borzage & Lewis Milestone

Oscar Best Director gallery: All 89 winners from Damien Chazelle to Frank Borzage & Lewis Milestone
All five of this year’s nominees for Best Director are looking for their first Oscar win. The lucky recipient will join the illustrious list of 69 filmmakers that have won in this category since the first Oscars were handed out in May of 1929. We have compiled the definitive gallery of every Best Director winner in the 89-year history of the Academy Awards, from the first year — which had two recipients — to reigning champ Damien Chazelle (“La La Land”). Click through our detailed Best Director photo gallery above.

At the inaugural Oscar ceremony, two directors were honored– one for comedy (Lewis Milestone for “Two Arabian Nights”) and one for drama (Frank Borzage for “7th Heaven”); the practice was discontinued after the first year. On four occasions, a single director has scored multiple nominations in a single year, the most recent being Steven Soderbergh, who earned noms in 2000 for “Erin Brockovich” and “Traffic,
See full article at Gold Derby »

Trevor Reviews John Ford’s Young Mr. Lincoln [Criterion Collection Blu-ray Review]

Young Mr. Lincoln is certainly not John Ford’s most famous film, most respected film, or most important film — heck, it’s likely none of those things even in 1939 because that year Ford also release the landmark film Stagecoach. Beyond that, if you’re watching Young Mr. Lincoln in an uncharitable mood the film will probably come of as cloying, sentimental, nostalgic for a time that never existed. From a broad perspective, it can definitely feel saccharine and simplistic, with villains stirring up gullible townsfolk to prosecute to the death the meek sons of a wronged, earnest family with nothing but holiness and a desire to work in their hearts. Who can right this wrong? The young Mr. Lincoln, who, early in the film, is struck by a deep truth while studying the law: “By jing, that’s all there is to it. Right and wrong.”

But despite these aspects,
See full article at CriterionCast »

Oscars 2018: Will Best Picture and Best Director line up for the first time since ‘Birdman’?

Oscars 2018: Will Best Picture and Best Director line up for the first time since ‘Birdman’?
It used to be pretty much an Academy Awards norm that the film that won Best Picture also took home the Oscar for Best Director. In recent years that has changed, largely due to the preferential ballot that has been implemented for Best Picture voting. These two categories have split in four of the past five years, with “Birdman” (2014) and its director Alejandro G. Inarritu being the last time they lined up. Currently “The Shape of Water” is in first place to win both categories on Gold Derby’s Oscar charts, so might things get back on track this year?

See 2018 Oscar nominations: Full list of Academy Awards nominees in all 24 categories

A year ago Damien Chazelle won Best Director for “La La Land” while “Moonlight” took Best Picture, becoming the fourth time this decade that the Oscar split occurred. In 2015 Inarritu won Best Director for “The Revenent” (his second
See full article at Gold Derby »

‘Lady Bird’: Why Greta Gerwig Deserves a Nomination, and Our Masculine Conception of Good Directing

‘Lady Bird’: Why Greta Gerwig Deserves a Nomination, and Our Masculine Conception of Good Directing
The frustration over no women nominated for Best Director at the Golden Globes (and some fear, the Oscars) reached a tipping point when presenter Natalie Portman pointedly introduced the “all-male nominees.” In a year that saw incredible, female-directed films resonate with audiences and critics, it reads as a form of sexism. As the awards race narrows, this frustration is becoming focused on “Lady Bird,” a near universally praised film that has become a leading contender in a number of big categories, including Best Picture, Actress and Screenplay — but possibly, not Director.

Complicating matters is “Lady Bird” doesn’t easily fit into Hollywood or the Academy’s concept of great directing. Guillermo del Toro’s constantly moving and beautifully orchestrated camera in “The Shape of Water” creates a magical sensation that his characters are ready to burst into song at any moment. Steven Spielberg takes potential dry and expository material about
See full article at Indiewire »

Cutting ‘Lady Bird’: Greta Gerwig and her Editor Tackled a Bittersweet Mother-Daughter Love Story

Cutting ‘Lady Bird’: Greta Gerwig and her Editor Tackled a Bittersweet Mother-Daughter Love Story
“Lady Bird,” actress Greta Gerwig’s remarkable directorial debut, offered one of the season’s best examples of editing, courtesy of Nick Houy (“Billions”). His sharp cuts and sense of balance help to navigate a perilous coming-of-age story for the eponymous teen (Saoirse Ronan) from the wrong side of the tracks in Sacramento of 2002. At the same time, Houy keeps the focus on the bittersweet conflict between Lady Bird and her mother, Marion (Laurie Metcalf).

(Warning: Spoilers Follow)

In fact, this is where the heart and soul of “Lady Bird” resides and why Gerwig, Ronan, Metcalf, and Houy are all strong contenders for Oscar nominations. “From the very first shot, it’s evident that it’s a mother-daughter love story,” said Houy, who was introduced to Gerwig by editor Jen Lame (“Frances Ha,” “Mistress America”). “It was always by design. We just brought it to the level that it needed to be.
See full article at Indiewire »

The Quad Salutes Lois Smith by Screening Her Career Highlights

Smith in “Marjorie Prime

Just days ago Lois Smith received this year’s Golden Key Award for Career Achievement at the Key West Film Festival. Now comes word that the industry vet will be honored at New York City’s Quad Cinema. Four of her career highlights will be screened: “East of Eden,” “Five Easy Pieces,” “Foxes,” and “Marjorie Prime.” Released earlier this year, the latter sees Smith playing a former violinist in the middle stages of dementia. She maintains a close relationship with her late husband who exists in the form of a holographic projection (Jon Hamm, “Mad Men”). Smith received excellent reviews for the sci-fi flick.

“Enjoying her seventh decade onscreen, actress par excellence Lois Smith was recently on view at the Quad recreating her stage triumph with her beautiful multifaceted performance in ‘Marjorie Prime’ — and now she’s back in theaters with ‘Lady Bird,’” an announcement from The Quad reads.
See full article at Women and Hollywood »

Junior Bonner

Sam Peckinpah was a fine director of actors when the material was right, and his first collaboration with Steve McQueen is an shaded character study about a rodeo family dealing with changing times. Joe Don Baker and Ben Johnson shine, but the movie belongs to Ida Lupino and Robert Preston.

Junior Bonner

Blu-ray

Kl Studio Classics

1972 / Color / 2:35 widescreen / 100 min. / Special Edition / Street Date October 31, 2017 / available through Kino Lorber / 29.95

Starring: Steve McQueen, Robert Preston, Ida Lupino, Joe Don Baker, Ben Johnson, Mary Murphy, Dub Taylor, Don ‘Red’ Barry, Bill McKinney.

Cinematography: Lucien Ballard

Film Editors: Frank Santillo, Robert L. Wolfe

Second Unit Director: Frank Kowalski

Bud Hurlbud: Special Effects

Original Music: Jerry Fielding

Written by Jeb Rosebrook

Produced by Joe Wizan

Directed by Sam Peckinpah

I suppose there were plenty of successful rodeo-themed westerns back in the day, perhaps the kind interrupted by a cowboy song every ten minutes or so.
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Nora Johnson, 'World of Henry Orient' Novelist and Screenwriter, Dies at 84

Nora Johnson, 'World of Henry Orient' Novelist and Screenwriter, Dies at 84
Nora Johnson, who adapted her novel The World of Henry Orient for the popular 1964 big-screen adaptation that starred Peter Sellers, has died. She was 84.

Johnson died Thursday in Dallas, one of her daughters, Marion Siwek, told The Hollywood Reporter.

Her father was two-time Oscar nominee Nunnally Johnson, the screenwriter, producer and director behind such Hollywood classics as The Grapes of Wrath, The Three Faces of Eve, The Man in the Gray Flannel Suit and The Dirty Dozen.

The World of Henry Orient, first published in 1958 when the author was just 25, came from Johnson's infatuation with Oscar...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News »

John Steinbeck’s Stepdaughter Awarded $13M In Family Feud Over Movie Rights

John Steinbeck’s Stepdaughter Awarded $13M In Family Feud Over Movie Rights
The jury is still out whether a new adaptation of The Grapes of Wrath will be going forward but in less than two hours today a federal jury in downtown L.A. decided that John Steinbeck's stepdaughter deserves more than $13 million to settle a family feud over who controls the rights to the great author's works. “We are pleased with the jury’s verdict that recognizes the Estate’s full control of the rights to John Steinbeck’s works,” said Waverly Scott Kaffaga in a…
See full article at Deadline Movie News »

John Steinbeck's Feuding Heirs Head to Trial Over Steven Spielberg 'Grapes of Wrath' Adaptation

John Steinbeck's Feuding Heirs Head to Trial Over Steven Spielberg 'Grapes of Wrath' Adaptation
On Aug. 29, the descendants of the late great American novelist John Steinbeck will begin a weeklong trial that's largely focused on two films that were never made — a DreamWorks adaptation of The Grapes of Wrath, once set to be directed by Steven Spielberg and starring Daniel Day-Lewis, and a Universal/Imagine adaptation of East of Eden.

For decades, the Steinbeck clan has feuded with each other for control of the Nobel Prize-winning fiction author's works. For a while, that meant termination notices pursuant to copyright law. There was later some issue over whether literary agents were operating without a license. Most recently, the...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News »
loading
An error has occured. Please try again.

See also

Showtimes | External Sites