7.5/10
18,106
141 user 68 critic

Foreign Correspondent (1940)

Trailer
2:22 | Trailer
On the eve of World War II, a young American reporter tries to expose enemy agents in London.

Director:

Alfred Hitchcock

Writers:

Charles Bennett (screenplay), Joan Harrison (screenplay) | 2 more credits »
Nominated for 6 Oscars. Another 1 win. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Joel McCrea ... John Jones
Laraine Day ... Carol Fisher
Herbert Marshall ... Stephen Fisher
George Sanders ... Scott ffolliott
Albert Bassermann ... Van Meer (as Albert Basserman)
Robert Benchley ... Stebbins
Edmund Gwenn ... Rowley
Eduardo Ciannelli ... Mr. Krug (as Eduardo Cianelli)
Harry Davenport ... Mr. Powers
Martin Kosleck ... Tramp
Frances Carson ... Mrs. Sprague
Ian Wolfe ... Stiles
Charles Wagenheim ... Assassin
Eddie Conrad ... Latvian (as Edward Conrad)
Charles Halton ... Bradley
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Storyline

Johnny Jones is an action reporter on a New York newspaper. The editor appoints him European correspondent because he is fed up with the dry, reports he currently gets. Jones' first assignment is to get the inside story on a secret treaty agreed between two European countries by the famous diplomat, Mr. Van Meer. However things don't go to plan and Jones enlists the help of a young woman to help track down a group of spies. Written by Col Needham <col@imdb.com>

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Plot Keywords:

policeman | fuzz | pig | bacon | reporter | See All (309) »

Taglines:

MYSTERY IN WHISPERS that cracks like THUNDER! (original print ad - many caps) See more »


Certificate:

Passed | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Edmund Gwenn, who plays McRae's elderly cockney "bodyguard," is best remembered for his Oscar-winning portrayal of "Kris Kringle" in Miracle on 34th Street (1947). See more »

Goofs

The establishing shot of the Hotel Europe is actually an outtake from the later rooftop escape sequence. Haverstock can be seen on the far left edge of the frame, next to the neon letter "H", crawling across the roof, although he is still in his hotel room at this point in the story. See more »

Quotes

Carol Fisher: One cabin isn't going to do us much good, is it? We just can't...
John Jones: Oh, well, I fully intended to sleep in the lounge. I hope you didn't think I...
Carol Fisher: No, of course not. It's very kind of you.
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Crazy Credits

Opening credits prologue: To those intrepid ones who went across the seas to be the eyes and ears of America... To those forthright ones who early saw the clouds of war while many of us at home were seeing rainbows... To those clear-headed ones who now stand like recording angels among the dead and dying... To the Foreign Correspondents - this motion picture is dedicated. See more »

Alternate Versions

Due to its political theme, no German distributor was willing to show the film until 1960. Then, after the huge success of Psycho, Constantin Film released the film with a running time of ca. 98 Minutes; approximately 22 minutes were cut, mainly Nazi-sequences. ZDF (Zweites Deutsches Fernsehen) showed the film in 1995 for the first time ever in Germany in a newly-dubbed uncut version. See more »

Connections

Referenced in Remington Steele: Steele in the News (1983) See more »

Soundtracks

The Star Spangled Banner
(1814) (uncredited)
Music by John Stafford Smith
Lyrics by Francis Scott Key
In the score and sung by unspecified voices at the end
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User Reviews

 
In many ways, the master's most accessible film
24 May 2001 | by sultana-1See all my reviews

Hitchcock may not have wanted him, but Joel Mac Crea's "everyman" performance as "Huntley Haverstock" is the most purely likeable and accessible protagonist Hitchcock has ever had. And, that works perfectly for the movies which gets plenty of the dark and mysterious and perverted from the magnificent supporting cast (including Marshall, Gwenn, Sanders, and many others...). But McCrea's feckless honesty and stubborn determination (rather than the more usual-for-Hitchcock obsession) work refreshingly in contrast with the others.

All the other typical master touches, impeccable camera work, a great score, intricate interwoven plotlines, and many dualities are all on hand for a truly great and unforgettable cinematic experience.

Watch this film!


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Frequently Asked Questions

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Details

Country:

USA

Language:

English | Dutch | German | Latvian

Release Date:

16 August 1940 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

Personal History See more »

Filming Locations:

Amsterdam, Netherlands See more »

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Box Office

Budget:

$1,500,000 (estimated)
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

| (cut)

Sound Mix:

Mono (Western Electric Mirrophonic Recording)

Aspect Ratio:

1.37 : 1
See full technical specs »

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