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A Chump at Oxford (1939) Poster

Trivia

Anita Garvin's final film with Laurel & Hardy. She came out of retirement as a favor to Stan Laurel, playing basically the same role she had played in Laurel & Hardy's silent film From Soup to Nuts (1928), whose title is a line of Ollie's dialogue in this movie.
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In the movie's final scenes, Stan Laurel played a snob named Lord Paddington, the only instance after 1927 in which Stan Laurel played a role not related to his Stanley character.
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This film was originally in four reels, a "streamliner" designed to compete with theaters' new double feature concept. Roach produced only a few of these hybrids, and added the dinner party sequence later to bring it up to six reels.
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Stan's accent as Lord Paddington was nothing like his own native Lancastrian accent. Paddington was a mimic of other actors with whom he had shared the stage decades earlier.
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This was the first Hal Roach Laurel & Hardy film to be released through United Artists.
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In the shorter "steamline" version, the name on the bank president's door is "James Finlayson," the name of one of Laurel and Hardy's frequent supporting plays. In the extended version, the real James Finlayson got a prominent role and the shot of the bank president's door was deleted.
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This film was first telecast in New York City Sunday 8 August 1948 on WPIX (Channel 11), as part of their newly acquired series of three dozen Hal Roach feature film productions, originally theatrically released between 1931 and 1943, and now being syndicated for television broadcast by Regal Television Pictures. In Los Angeles its television premiere occurred Tuesday 14 December 1948 on KTLA (Channel 5), in Atlanta Friday 7 January 1949 on WSB (Channel 8), and in Philadelphia it first aired Thursday 12 May 1949 on WCAU (Channel 10).
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After the dinner party scene ends and the boys are seen walking down the street (Ollie is carrying a broom over his left shoulder and Stan is pushing a dustcart), they pass a building which says "Finlayson National Bank", which is obviously a nod towards their frequent co-star foil James Finlayson.
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The scenes of the employment agency and dinner party were originally filmed for the 63 minute version to be released overseas simultaneously with a USA 42 minute print, but the 63 minute version was released in the USA as well.
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Premiere voted this movie as one of "The 50 Greatest Comedies Of All Time" in 2006.
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Whilst lost in the maze (and sitting down), Stan Laurel and the "ghost" (who is playing tricks on him and Oliver Hardy) play a short game of "finger wiggle".
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This movie was released in cinema halls in Kerala, India as "Chump in College"
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Look out for an early film appearance by future British horror film legend Peter Cushing. He is one of the students singing 'Fee Fie Fo Fum' and appears in a couple of other scenes too. He was just 26 years old when this was made, but is still easily identifiable despite having only a tiny role.
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For the ear wiggling that Stan does he would be filmed with his ears as normal then they'd be held forward with putty or similar material and the camera restarted. The two sections would be joined together then copied and joined many times for repetition. Filmed in slow motion then projected at normal speed the ears would wave vigorously. This would be why Stan's face is fixed in one position for a relatively long time.
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Opening credits prologue: From 1927 to 1940, LAUREL & HARDY made marvelous short subjects and feature films at Hal Roach Studios, earning praise as the greatest comedy team ever produced by the movies or television. The world has never stopped laughing.

A CHUMP AT OXFORD was originally produced as a "streamlined feature" to run 42 minutes for the American market. For simultaneous European release as a feature, a prologue running approximately 20 minutes was added.

The KirchGroup is therefore proud to present this original, expanded, European version.
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Opening credits: The events and characters depicted in this photoplay are fictitious. Any similarity to actual persons, living or dead, is purely coincidental.
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