7.2/10
6,593
64 user 34 critic

The Bank Dick (1940)

Not Rated | | Comedy | 29 November 1940 (USA)
Henpecked Egbert Sousé has comic adventures as a substitute film director and unlikely bank guard.

Director:

Edward F. Cline (as Edward Cline)

Writer:

W.C. Fields (original screen play) (as Mahatma Kane Jeeves)
Reviews
1 win. See more awards »

Photos

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
W.C. Fields ... Egbert Sousé
Cora Witherspoon ... Agatha Sousé
Una Merkel ... Myrtle Sousé
Evelyn Del Rio Evelyn Del Rio ... Elsie Mae Adele Brunch Sousé
Jessie Ralph ... Mrs. Hermisillo Brunch
Franklin Pangborn ... J. Pinkerton Snoopington
Shemp Howard ... Joe Guelpe
Dick Purcell ... Mackley Q. Greene (as Richard Purcell)
Grady Sutton ... Og Oggilby
Russell Hicks ... J. Frothingham Waterbury
Pierre Watkin ... Mr. Skinner
Al Hill ... Filthy McNasty - aka Rupulsive Rogan
George Moran George Moran ... Cozy Cochran - aka Loudmouth Nasty
Bill Wolfe Bill Wolfe ... Otis
Jack Norton ... A. Pismo Clam
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Storyline

Egbert Sousé leads an ordinary life but is about to have an extraordinary day. Henpecked at home home by his demanding wife Agatha and more or less ignored by his daughter Myrtle, he sets off for the day. He comes across a movie shoot whose drunken director hasn't shown up for work and Egbert, saying he has experience, is hired. Afterward, he gets credit for stopping bank robbers and is rewarded with a job as the bank guard. He seems headed for trouble however when he convinces his son-in-law Og, a teller at the same bank, to use $500 for can't lose investment. The investment is a scam however and when the bank examiner arrives, it looks bad for them. As you would expect however, it all turns out well in the end. Written by garykmcd

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

Was His Face Red . . . And His Nose, Too ! when the bandits took the money . . . and the SAFE !

Genres:

Comedy

Certificate:

Not Rated | See all certifications »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Screen credits erroneously list Al Hill as Filthy McNasty and George Moran as Cozy Cochran, but their correct role identifications are Repulsive Rogan (Hill) and Loudmouth McNasty (Moran). See more »

Goofs

Throughout the car chase at the end of the film, tires are constantly heard squealing and screeching, although the entire chase takes place on dirt roads and in fields, where tires wouldn't squeal. See more »

Quotes

Egbert Sousé: Did you warble my little wren?
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Connections

References Gone with the Wind (1939) See more »

Soundtracks

Home Sweet Home
(1823) (uncredited)
Music by H.R. Bishop
Background music near the beginning of the movie and at the end
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User Reviews

 
W.C. Fields represents America's aspirations right before we entered WWII
21 September 2007 | by lee_eisenbergSee all my reviews

As I understand it, W.C. Fields spent at least most of his career playing henpecked drunks. Believe it or not, "The Bank Dick" is the first of his movies that I've ever seen; and I really liked it. Fields plays Egbert Souse - with an acute accent on the E - a bored family man never too aware of his surroundings. One day, he accidentally stops a bank robber but is only too happy to take credit for it. So they make him a security guard.

Throughout parts of the movie, I wasn't sure whether it was going to be as funny as I usually like (and there was a scene portraying a black man in a manner that wouldn't be allowed nowadays), but it was quite entertaining overall and the whole chase was certainly beyond a hoot. I suspect that they had a lot of fun filming it. Moreover, one might interpret Fields's as a look at America's aspirations of getting out of the Depression (that's pure conjecture, so don't quote me).

So, having seen this movie, I understand what W.C. Fields's brand of humor constituted. One can see why Warner Bros. animation department liked to caricature him as a manipulative pig in some cartoons. Worth seeing.


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Frequently Asked Questions

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Details

Country:

USA

Language:

English

Release Date:

29 November 1940 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

The Great Man See more »

Filming Locations:

Lompoc, California, USA See more »

Company Credits

Production Co:

Universal Pictures See more »
Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Mono (Western Electric Mirrophonic Recording)

Aspect Ratio:

1.37 : 1
See full technical specs »

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