Andy Hardy Meets Debutante (1940) - News Poster

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Judy by the Numbers: "I'm Nobody's Baby"

Anne Marie is tracking Judy Garland's career through musical numbers...

Today's clip is a plea for the importance of audio preservation. Unlike last week's short, which survives as only 3 minutes of grainy footage of Judy Garland singing to a statue, Andy Hardy Meets Debutante has been remastered and restored several times since its 1940 release. However, Judy completists who watch the movie may be surprised at what a musical it's not. That's because two songs are missing from the film. The Movie: Andy Hardy Meets Debutante (MGM, 1940)

The Songwriters: Benny Davis, Milton Ager, and Lester Stanley

The Players: Mickey Rooney, Judy Garland, Lewis Stone, Ann Rutherford, directed by George B. Seitz

The Story: Judy Garland only sings two songs in the entirety of her second Andy Hardy film. Unlike most Mickey/Judy pairings, Andy Hardy Meets Debutante does not follow the "let's put on a show" plotline. Instead, the film
See full article at FilmExperience »

Actors Who’ve Played the Same Character the Most Times

  • Cinelinx
With Hugh Jackman currently negotiating to play Wolverine for a seventh and eighth time, Cinelinx takes a look at actors who’ve played the same role eight times or more. Who has played the same character most often? Come in and find out.

Hugh Jackman has already played Wolverine five times--x-Men (2000), X2: X-Men United (2003) X-Men: The Last Stand (2006), X-Men Origins: Wolverine (2009), and The Wolverine (2013)—as well as a cameo in X-Men:First Class (2011). Soon we’ll be seeing him fully clawed again on the big screen in X-Men: Days of Future Past. Recently, he told Collider that he might shoot Wolverine 3 and X-Men: Apocalypse “back-to-back”, which would make a total of eight times (9 times with the cameo) that he’ll portray the Canadian mutant.

You might be thinking “Wow! That’s amazing! I’ve never heard of anyone playing the same role so many times.” Well, for those who may not know it,
See full article at Cinelinx »

Rooney Was No Andy Hardy in Real Life: Longest Film Career Ever?

Mickey Rooney dead at 93: Four-time Oscar nominee, frequent Judy Garland co-star may have had the longest film career ever (photo: Mickey Rooney ca. 1940) Mickey Rooney, four-time Academy Award nominee and one of the biggest domestic box-office draws during the studio era, died of "natural causes" on Sunday, April 6, 2014, at his home in the Los Angeles suburb of North Hollywood. The Brooklyn-born Rooney (as Joseph Yule Jr., on September 23, 1920) had reportedly been in ill health for some time. He was 93. Besides his countless movies, and numerous television and stage appearances, Mickey Rooney was also known for his stormy private life, which featured boozing and gambling, some widely publicized family infighting (including his testifying in Congress in 2011 about elder abuse), his filing for bankruptcy in 1962 after having earned a reported $12 million (and then going bankrupt again in 1996), his eight marriages — including those to actresses Ava Gardner, Martha Vickers, and Barbara Ann Thomason
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Mickey Rooney, Hollywood Legend, Dies At 93

Legendary actor Mickey Rooney died Sunday in Los Angeles, Calif. He was 93.

Mickey Rooney Dies

The Brooklyn-born Rooney, who got his first acting gig at just 17 months old, is best known for the series of Andy Hardy films that came out in the 1930s. Starring alongside Judy Garland, Rooney became the most bankable actor throughout the Depression-era. Among the Andy Hardy films were, Love Finds Andy Hardy, Andy Hardy Gets Spring Fever, Andy Hardy Meets Debutante and Love Laughs at Andy Hardy.

Following his incredible success at such a young age, Rooney struggled to remain a major player in Hollywood as an adult. In the 50s, there was the short-lived TV series, The Mickey Rooney Show that lasted just two years in which he played Mickey Mulligan. He had another TV vehicle in the 60s titled simply Mickey that lasted for 16 episodes.

Rooney went on to get minor parts in films,
See full article at Uinterview »

Ann Rutherford: Gone With The Wind Actress Dies

Ann Rutherford, best remembered as Scarlett O’Hara’s younger sister Carreen in Gone with the Wind, died earlier this evening at her home in Beverly Hills according to Rutherford’s friend, actress Anne Jeffreys. Rutherford, who had been suffering from heart problems, was 94 as per the Los Angeles Times obit (as per most other sources, she was 91). [Recent Ann Rutherford photos, Ann Rutherford and Marsha Hunt.]

In 2010, Rutherford told the Times that MGM mogul Louis B. Mayer was unwilling to loan her out for "a nothing part" such as Carreen in son-in-law David O. Selznick’s mammoth adaptation of Margaret Mitchell’s novel. Mayer changed his mind when Rutherford burst into tears.

Gone with the Wind ultimately became the biggest blockbuster ever. To this day, the Civil War romantic drama has sold more tickets than any other movie in North America. (Possibly, around the world, relative to population.) Gwtw also won eight Oscars, in addition to two special awards.
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Hallelujah! A Judy Garland Retrospective

The Lincoln Center and the Paley Center here in NYC have joined forces to celebrate the all-singing all-dancing legend that is Judy Garland

Shout 'Hallelujah', c'mon get happy!"

Once upon a time she was dubbed "The World's Greatest Entertainer." Few celebrities have ever earned their PR self-mythologizing titles the way Judy G did. There's just no beating her for musical pleasure and cathartic heartbreak. And as if her sensational singing and dancing weren't enough, she was a fine actress, too!

I missed the first week of the celebration being in Michigan but I'll see what I can catch for the remainder of the summer program which ends August 9th. If you're not in New York City, you can always follow along at home as best you can with an impromptu DVD festival.

 

Still to come in the festival are...

Young Judy:

Everybody Sing (1938), For Me and My Gal (1942), Presenting Lily Mars
See full article at FilmExperience »

All Singin., All Dancin., All Judy! July 26 – August 9

Impressive retrospective of Judy Garland.s films will feature 31 titles including a presentation of seldom seen short films and rarities as well as a special .sing-along. screening of The Wizard Of Oz.

On the occasion of what would have been Judy Garland.s 89th birthday, the Film Society of Lincoln Center and The Paley Center have announced the details today for Fslc.s comprehensive retrospective of the peerless film icon.s work, All Singin., All Dancin., All Judy! which will screen at the Walter Reade Theater July 26 . August 9 and The Paley Center.s comprehensive retrospective of Garland.s television work,Judy Garland: The Television Years which will be presented July 20 . August 18.

With autumn marking the 75th anniversary of Judy Garland’s feature film debut (Pigskin Parade, 1936), the Film Society of Lincoln Center will screen 31 titles from July 26 . August 9, including each of her big-screen acting performances, to pay tribute to
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

Gone With The Wind vs. Melody Ranch: The Unreliability of Box Office Polls

Clark Gable, Vivien Leigh in Gone with the Wind Sandra Bullock: Top Box Office Star Gone with the Wind opened in late December 1939. Boom Town became one of the biggest hits of 1940. Both movies starred Clark Gable, who kept himself quite busy by also starring in Comrade X and Strange Cargo. The biggest box-office star of 1940, according to Quigley’s exhibitors’ poll? Mickey Rooney. Sure, Rooney’s vehicles were box-office, but they weren’t Gable-caliber box-office. But stuff like Strike Up the Band and Andy Hardy Meets Debutante did well in small towns, where owners of little movie houses were happy to book flicks showing Mickey dating Judy — or Gene Autry (right) hanging out with his horse. Autry starred in [...]
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

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