The Women (1939) - News Poster

(1939)

News

‘The Women,’ ‘Mother’ Top Locarno’s Open Doors

  • Variety
‘The Women,’ ‘Mother’ Top Locarno’s Open Doors
One project from Sri Lanka –Sanjeewa Pushpakumara’s “Mother”– and another from Myanmar –The Maw Naing’s “The Women”– won ex-aequo, the main kudos at the Locarno Festival’s Open Doors co-production forum.

The winning projects share a high sensitivity towards female-related issues, a trend among many of the participants this year. The $50,000 award was split between the two.

Produced by Youngjeong Oh at Yangon-based One Point Zero, “The Women,” the third feature of The Maw Naing (Karlovy Vary-premiered “The Monk”) turns on the struggles of four women who have moved from remote villages to the city of Yangon, Myanmar to work and get a better life. The four women share a bedroom near the city factory area.

“Despite working hard and keeping their hopes high, they can’t escape from poverty. Their lives are not strongly connected, but from their present, we can see their past and future. I
See full article at Variety »

Locarno 2018 reveals winners of Open Doors prizes

Locarno 2018 reveals winners of Open Doors prizes
The Women’ by Myanmar’s The Maw Naing wins the top prize of €30,300.

Filmmakers from Myanmar, Sri Lanka, Bangladesh and Nepal were among the winners of this year’s edition of the Locarno Festival’s Open Doors project showcase.

Myanmar-based poet, artist and filmmaker The Maw Naing won the Open Doors production grant of €30,300 for his second narrative feature film project The Women.

The drama about four women from remote villages who travel to the city in search of work is being produced by the Berlin-based Yangon Film School and the director’s own production company One Point Zero. The
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Doc NYC 2017 Women Directors: Meet Harriet Hirshorn — “Nothing Without Us: The Women Who Will End…

Doc NYC 2017 Women Directors: Meet Harriet Hirshorn — “Nothing Without Us: The Women Who Will End AIDS”“Nothing Without Us: The Women Who Will End AIDS”

Harriet Hirshorn is a documentary filmmaker with a focus on social justice issues. She has chronicled HIV/AIDS activism in Africa from 2001–2013, and her work includes extensive coverage of AIDS activists. Hirshorn’s documentary work includes dozens of short films about HIV and a variety of digital projects about HIV/AIDS and women in Africa. Her films include “Mississippi I Am” (2010), “The Disappearance of TiSoeur: Haiti After Duvalier,” and “Pote Mak Sonje (Whoever Bears the Scar Remembers): The Raboteau Trial.”

“Nothing Without Us: The Women Who Will End AIDS” will premiere at the 2017 Doc NYC film festival on November 10.

W&H: Describe the film for us in your own words.

Hh: “Nothing Without Us” is the first documentary to tell the story of how HIV+ women on two continents turned a devastating diagnosis into a fight for survival — and a movement to end a global epidemic.

The film takes viewers into the twin hearts of the current HIV/AIDS pandemic — sub-Saharan Africa and Black America — to meet five women who transformed public health policy with their refusal to accept a racist and sexist status quo. Featuring an all-female cast and an exciting mix of new and rare archival footage from Burundi, Nigeria, New York, and Louisiana, this inspiring documentary traces the journey from private grief and political oppression to community leadership and collective action.

“Nothing Without Us” reveals the unsung work that HIV+ women do, not only for themselves but for children and men — from inside prison, out on the street, in the fields of healthcare, and in the highest halls of government. Along the way, viewers come to understand that the AIDS crisis — where women are more than half the epidemic worldwide and two-thirds of new infections globally, and which now affects more than 37 million women and millions of others worldwide — is far from over, and that no solution will be complete until it addresses the complex realities of all women’s lives.

W&H: What drew you to this story?

Hh: In the ’90s I was involved with filmmaker Mary Patierno and helped care for her brother David Miller until his death in 1993. I was the associate producer of her film “The Most Unknowable Thing,” about David’s struggle with AIDS that Mary finished in 1999.

Like many people of my generation, and particularly gay and lesbian people, I was traumatized by the fight-to-the-death taking place around me and I was active in Actup. Some of the archival protest footage of civil disobedience at the beginning of this film was shot by Mary and I.

To celebrate the ten year anniversary of the HIV Law Project in 1998, I made a ten minute documentary for its founder Terry McGovern about the HIV Law Project and the campaign to change the definition of AIDS to include illnesses experienced by women. In the late ’80s when AIDS was devastating communities, women who had HIV could not obtain an AIDS diagnosis, and therefore could not access services and rights because all of the studies up until then only involved men. AIDS was perceived as a gay — and white — male disease, when in fact women and communities of color were experiencing the same devastation.

Actup started a campaign to change the definition, and Terry McGovern and the HIV Law Project sued the Us government. Many years later, they won.

Fast forward to 2001, when I met Marie de Cenival, Vice President of Actup Paris and leading member of their international committee. She was focusing on getting AIDS drugs to Africa as she was about to address the first Un Special Session on AIDS in the first meeting of what became the Global Fund to Fight AIDS Malaria and Tuberculosis.

From Marie, I learned that among the millions of Africans living with HIV and dying from AIDS, there was a strong and active movement in which Actup Paris had been heavily involved since 1996 to get HIV drugs including ARVs — antiretroviral “cocktails” — into countries hardest hit by the pandemic.

When I accompanied her as she researched economics and intellectual property laws, I witnessed firsthand many women living with HIV who were leading their countries’ activism. I realized the extent to which this was an untold, unacknowledged story and wanted to make an inspiring film about their work.

Really, I would love to make a series of portraits that would bring to light the amazing stories of thousands of characters. But in this film I had to choose only five.

W&H: What do you want people to think about when they are leaving the theater?

Hh: I want people to see that the end of AIDS actually is possible and that if everyone was on ARVs, HIV would end.

I want people to think about that without women, the end will not be possible.

The majority of Americans believe that AIDS is over. Besides the isolated and distant coverage of it — the recent spike in opiate-using populations in the rural U.S. and the growing epidemics in Asia and elsewhere — most still think that AIDS is an issue contained in Africa or a disease affecting only gay men.

Such misconceptions are dangerous, fueling ignorance and dismissal of a health and human rights crisis affecting nearly 37 million people worldwide — more than half of whom are women. Until the general public understands the full scope of AIDS and its entanglement with issues of poverty, race, reproductive justice, global inequality, and discrimination against women, no solution will be complete.

The film restores women activists to their rightful place in the historical record and asserts the current, unaddressed urgency of women’s needs surrounding HIV. The film reveals the parallel struggles that women face across continents fighting for reproductive justice, healthcare access for all, and a more complex and realistic view of how the epidemic affects women. Anyone who cares about gender inequality and its impact on social and health crises will see a vital message in this film.

I want audiences who leave the theater to be talking about that, as well as how to get a maximum number of people to see the film since distribution is always the next challenge — how to get the film to people who need to see it.

W&H: What was the biggest challenge in making the film?

Hh: I was surprised that the knowledge gap between the general population and the people involved in HIV activism was so huge, and my biggest challenge was how to include a maximum amount of information without making a film that was too dense for a general audience to digest.

W&H: How did you get your film funded? Share some insights into how you got the film made.

Hh: I bumped into Terry McGovern in Kenya when I was filming Rolake Odetoyinbo for a short piece on preventing mother-to-child transmission of HIV that I was producing for The New York Times/Herald Tribune. I had been following Odetoyinbo for several years already and I told Terry that she was an amazing activist in Nigeria, and Terry listened. Many years later, she invited me to submit a proposal to the Ford Foundation on both African women’s activism and African American women’s activism.

W&H: What does it mean for you to have your film play at Doc NYC?

Hh: It is tremendously exciting and I hope we sell out.

W&H: What’s the best and worst advice you’ve received

Hh: The best advice I have received is to persevere and have faith in my vision, and the worst advice I have received is that the world doesn’t need another documentary on AIDS.

W&H: What advice do you have for other female directors?

Hh: My advice for other female directors is to pursue their vision and not listen to the naysayers.

W&H: Name your favorite woman-directed film and why.

Hh: I am a huge fan of Chantal Akerman and Agnes Varda. I could write too many pages and stop all other activities for weeks to explain why I love them so much. The nutshell version would be Akerman for her obsession and originality, and Varda for her discipline and philosophical daring. Both of these women I feel have tremendous courage and faith in themselves and their films are daring and indicate a lack of fear of failure.

W&H: There have been significant conversations over the last couple of years about increasing the amount of opportunities for women directors yet the numbers have not increased. Are you optimistic about the possibilities for change? Share any thoughts you might have on this topic.

Hh: I’m not optimistic because so many talented women filmmakers exist and yet it seems like we have decided that there are a limited number of slots for them on our radar.

As a member of the Paris-based group La Barbe, I think we have to protest the male domination of the domain of filmmaking. I don’t think it is enough to just try to make our films and fight our way. I think we also need to underscore the lack of women wherever we see it because I don’t think it’s about not being good enough. I feel that there is an old boy and new boy’s network that tries to shut us out, even when it’s unconscious.

I also believe that one way to fight this is to make the commitment to hire women in production and post-production when possible. This worked well for me. I am proud of the women who worked with me on this film and grateful for their vision and their support.

Doc NYC 2017 Women Directors: Meet Harriet Hirshorn — “Nothing Without Us: The Women Who Will End… was originally published in Women and Hollywood on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.
See full article at Women and Hollywood »

From Mad Method Actor to Humankind Advocate: One of the Greatest Film Actors of the 20th Century

From Mad Method Actor to Humankind Advocate: One of the Greatest Film Actors of the 20th Century
Updated: Following a couple of Julie London Westerns*, Turner Classic Movies will return to its July 2017 Star of the Month presentations. On July 27, Ronald Colman can be seen in five films from his later years: A Double Life, Random Harvest (1942), The Talk of the Town (1942), The Late George Apley (1947), and The Story of Mankind (1957). The first three titles are among the most important in Colman's long film career. George Cukor's A Double Life earned him his one and only Best Actor Oscar; Mervyn LeRoy's Random Harvest earned him his second Best Actor Oscar nomination; George Stevens' The Talk of the Town was shortlisted for seven Oscars, including Best Picture. All three feature Ronald Colman at his very best. The early 21st century motto of international trendsetters, from Venezuela's Nicolás Maduro and Turkey's Recep Erdogan to Russia's Vladimir Putin and the United States' Donald Trump, seems to be, The world is reality TV and reality TV
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Lgbt Pride Month: TCM Showcases Gay and Lesbian Actors and Directors

Considering everything that's been happening on the planet in the last several months, you'd have thought we're already in November or December – of 2117. But no. It's only June. 2017. And in some parts of the world, that's the month of brides, fathers, graduates, gays, and climate change denial. Beginning this evening, Thursday, June 1, Turner Classic Movies will be focusing on one of these June groups: Lgbt people, specifically those in the American film industry. Following the presentation of about 10 movies featuring Frank Morgan, who would have turned 127 years old today, TCM will set its cinematic sights on the likes of William Haines, James Whale, George Cukor, Mitchell Leisen, Dorothy Arzner, Patsy Kelly, and Ramon Novarro. In addition to, whether or not intentionally, Claudette Colbert, Colin Clive, Katharine Hepburn, Douglass Montgomery (a.k.a. Kent Douglass), Marjorie Main, and Billie Burke, among others. But this is ridiculous! Why should TCM present a
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

8 classic feminist movies well ahead of their time

Jennifer Leigh Williamson Jun 13, 2017

As far back as the 1920s, cinema has brought us feminist heroes. Here's a bunch of films way ahead of their time...

“I never realised until lately that women were supposed to be the inferior sex.” - Katharine Hepburn

Feminism, equality of the sexes. Often when watching old movies, the sexism of the time can catch you off guard. Bums are pinched, bimbos bounce, old maids glower and you shake your head and sigh, glad that those times have (mostly) passed. So when we see classic films with strong, intelligent, impressive, witty, ambitious, feminist female characters, equals to their male counterparts, we sit up and take notice. There are many great classic films with impressive female characters, too many to list here. This article is about the characters that have inspired me personally. Classic feminist films way ahead of their time.

Spoilers ahead...

The Passion Of Joan Of Arc
See full article at Den of Geek »

‘Feud: Bette and Joan’: Alison Wright On How Her Fictional Character May Fare Better Than Real Women in Film

  • Indiewire
‘Feud: Bette and Joan’: Alison Wright On How Her Fictional Character May Fare Better Than Real Women in Film
If your favorite “Feud: Bette and Joan” character is Pauline, Alison Wright gets it.

“I kind of love her too,” she told IndieWire. “She’s a strong, assertive, capable, able woman, and not a victim in any sort of sense. She’s got her head screwed on pretty tight. Ryan [Murphy] initially described her as being whip-smart and cool as a cucumber, so that’s an attractive concept right there.”

Read More: ‘Feud: Bette and Joan’ Main Titles: How That Striking Vintage Opening Sequence Got Made

Wright first became familiar to FX audiences as another 20th century secretary, “poor Martha” of “The Americans.” But the two characters couldn’t be further apart. As the loyal and clever assistant to director Robert Aldrich (played in the show by Alfred Molina), Pauline represents a rare breed of Hollywood women for the year 1962 — an aspiring director, who in this week’s episode has the
See full article at Indiewire »

The Top Ten Funny Ladies of the Movies

The recent box office success of The Boss firmly establishes Melissa McCarthy as the current queen of movie comedies (Amy Schumer could be a new contender after an impressive debut last Summer with Trainwreck), but let us think back about those other funny ladies of filmdom. So while we’re enjoying the female reboot/re-imagining of Ghostbusters and those Bad Moms, here’s a top ten list that will hopefully inspire lots of laughter and cause you to search out some classic comedies. It’s tough to narrow them down to ten, but we’ll do our best, beginning with… 10. Eve Arden The droll Ms. Arden represents the comic sidekicks who will attempt to puncture the pomposity of the leading ladies with a well-placed wisecrack (see also the great Thelma Ritter in Rear Window). Her career began in the early 1930’s with great bit roles in Stage Door and Dancing Lady.
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

Scenic Routes: A movie without men finds a clever way to stay true to its premise

In Scenic Routes, Mike D’Angelo looks at key scenes, explaining how they work and what they mean.

“It’s all about men!” proclaimed the poster for 1939’s The Women, and the marketing department wasn’t kidding. Adapted from the hit play by Clare Boothe Luce and directed by George Cukor (who was well known for his superlative work with actresses, though being pigeonholed as Hollywood’s go-to guy for “women’s films” reportedly annoyed him), this lengthy melodrama passes the Bechdel test, but just barely, and only thanks to a few quick conversations about fashion. Virtually all of the dialogue concerns the various characters’ husbands—specifically, whether or not they’re cheating and whether/how to hang onto them if indeed they are. That doesn’t make it a bad movie, of course, but it is a tad ironic, given the film’s unusual conceit: For the entirety ...
See full article at The AV Club »

True believer by Anne-Katrin Titze

Valley of Love star Isabelle Huppert Photo: Anne-Katrin Titze

Jeff Nichols' Midnight Special, starring Michael Shannon, Kirsten Dunst and Jaeden Lieberher, prompted Isabelle Huppert to bring up Mud in our conversation on Guillaume Nicloux's haunting Valley Of Love. Anaïs Romand, George Cukor's The Women with Norma Shearer, Joan Crawford and Rosalind Russell and Woody Allen's Magic In The Moonlight came to mind.

Huppert and Gérard Depardieu, last seen on the screen together in Maurice Pialat's Loulou (1980), play a long divorced couple brought together by the death of their son. Similar in effect to what Nicloux did with The Kidnapping of Michel Houellebecq, fictional plot and biographical details merge so that in the end, only truth matters, once it has made its way through fact and fiction.

Isabelle Huppert: "For me, it's a great film about cinema ..."

Huppert, whose character is never named, arrives first in Death Valley.
See full article at eyeforfilm.co.uk »

The Happy Ending

Jean Simmons is the original frustrated Mad Housewife who runs away from a 'dream marriage' in search of something more fulfilling. Uncompromising, adult, and making use of an interesting cast. Plus, the soundtrack uses Michel Legrand's incomparable song "What Are You Doing the Rest of Your Life?" The Happy Ending Blu-ray Twilight Time Limited Edition 1969 / Color / 2:35 widescreen / 112 min. / Ship Date January 19, 2016 / available through Twilight Time Movies / 29.95 Starring Jean Simmons, John Forsythe, Shirley Jones, Teresa Wright, Nanette Fabray, Bobby Darin, Kathy Fields, Tina Louise, Dick Shawn, Lloyd Bridges, Karen Steele, Erin Moran. Cinematography Conrad Hall Original Music Michel Legrand, lyrics Alan & Marilyn Bergman Produced, Written and Directed by Richard Brooks

Reviewed by Glenn Erickson

I looked at some of the poster artwork for The Happy Ending, and yes indeed, one of the main styles is indeed like the cover of this disc -- a photo of a rusty garbage
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

How Sound Film Technology Evolved in the Last Century: Interview with Former UCLA Film Preservationist Gitt

Hal Roach looks on as technicians install Vitaphone equipment in his studio screening room, ca. 1928. (Click on the image to enlarge it.) 'A Century of Sound': Q&A with former UCLA Preservation Officer Robert Gitt about the evolution of film sound technology Long before multi-track Dolby stereo and digital sound technology, there were the Kinetophone and the Vitaphone systems – not to mention organ and piano players at movie houses. Much of that is discussed in A Century of Sound, which chronicles the evolution of film sound from the late 19th century to the mid-1970s. A Century of Sound has been split into two parts, with a third installment currently in the planning stages. They are: Vol. 1, “The Beginning, 1876-1932,” which came out on DVD in 2007. Vol. 2, “The Sound of Movies: 1933-1975,” which came out on Blu-ray in 2015. The third installment will bring the presentation into the 21st century.
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Norma Shearer films Note: This article is being revised and expanded. Please check back later. Turner Classic Movies' Norma Shearer month comes to a close this evening, Nov. 24, '15, with the presentation of the last six films of Shearer's two-decade-plus career. Two of these are remarkably good; one is schizophrenic, a confused mix of high comedy and low drama; while the other three aren't the greatest. Yet all six are worth a look even if only because of Norma Shearer herself – though, really, they all have more to offer than just their top star. Directed by W.S. Van Dyke, the no-expense-spared Marie Antoinette (1938) – $2.9 million, making it one of the most expensive movies ever made up to that time – stars the Canadian-born Queen of MGM as the Austrian-born Queen of France. This was Shearer's first film in two years (following Romeo and Juliet) and her first release following husband Irving G.
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Queen of MGM: Fighting Revolutionaries, Nazis, and Joan Crawford

Norma Shearer films Note: This article is being revised and expanded. Please check back later. Turner Classic Movies' Norma Shearer month comes to a close this evening, Nov. 24, '15, with the presentation of the last six films of Shearer's two-decade-plus career. Two of these are remarkably good; one is schizophrenic, a confused mix of high comedy and low drama; while the other three aren't the greatest. Yet all six are worth a look even if only because of Norma Shearer herself – though, really, they all have more to offer than just their top star. Directed by W.S. Van Dyke, the no-expense-spared Marie Antoinette (1938) – $2.9 million, making it one of the most expensive movies ever made up to that time – stars the Canadian-born Queen of MGM as the Austrian-born Queen of France. This was Shearer's first film in two years (following Romeo and Juliet) and her first release following husband Irving G.
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

[Tiff Review] The Women He’s Undressed

A performative exploration of Australia’s own Orry-Kelly, perhaps most infamously known as Cary Grant’s lover, Women He’s Undressed is a playful look at the man behind the costumes worn by Marilyn Monroe, Betty Davis, Humphrey Bogart, Rosalind Russell, and Errol Flynn, amongst other legends of Hollywood’s Golden Age. The film’s story is told via an electrifying mix of first-person interviews, performances of Orry-Kelly’s letters, and archival materials, including clips from his films Some Like It Hot, The Maltese Falcon, Les Girls, and Arsenic and Old Lace.

The film’s charms exist in the performative elements contextualized amongst the film’s interviewees. Director Gillian Armstrong (known for her narrative films Little Women and Oscar and Lucinda) paints a picture partially routed in national pride, about a small town boy from rural New South Wales who makes good in Hollywood. The fragmented nature of the narrative
See full article at The Film Stage »

Collins' Sex Novels Have Enjoyed Unexpectedly Few Film Versions (The Stud, The Bitch)

Joan Collins in 'The Bitch': Sex tale based on younger sister Jackie Collins' novel. Author Jackie Collins dead at 77: Surprisingly few film and TV adaptations of her bestselling novels Jackie Collins, best known for a series of bestsellers about the dysfunctional sex lives of the rich and famous and for being the younger sister of film and TV star Joan Collins, died of breast cancer on Sept. 19, '15, in Los Angeles. The London-born (Oct. 4, 1937) Collins was 77. Collins' tawdry, female-centered novels – much like those of Danielle Steel and Judith Krantz – were/are immensely popular. According to her website, they have sold more than 500 million copies in 40 countries. And if the increasingly tabloidy BBC is to be believed (nowadays, Wikipedia has become a key source, apparently), every single one of them – 32 in all – appeared on the New York Times' bestseller list. (Collins' own site claims that a mere 30 were included.) Sex
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

MGM's Lioness, the Epitome of Hollywood Superstardom, Has Her Day on TCM

Joan Crawford Movie Star Joan Crawford movies on TCM: Underrated actress, top star in several of her greatest roles If there was ever a professional who was utterly, completely, wholeheartedly dedicated to her work, Joan Crawford was it. Ambitious, driven, talented, smart, obsessive, calculating, she had whatever it took – and more – to reach the top and stay there. Nearly four decades after her death, Crawford, the star to end all stars, remains one of the iconic performers of the 20th century. Deservedly so, once you choose to bypass the Mommie Dearest inanity and focus on her film work. From the get-go, she was a capable actress; look for the hard-to-find silents The Understanding Heart (1927) and The Taxi Dancer (1927), and check her out in the more easily accessible The Unknown (1927) and Our Dancing Daughters (1928). By the early '30s, Joan Crawford had become a first-rate film actress, far more naturalistic than
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Spy: The Third Feature by Paul Feig, Our George Cukor

During his career, George Cukor was often referred to as a “women’s director” for his facility with foregrounded female performers: Katharine Hepburn in no less than 10 collaborations, Jean Simmons in The Actress, the women in The Women. By that logic, Paul Feig is our Cukor: beginning with Bridesmaids (since we’ve confined I Am David and Unaccompanied Minors to the rubble of collective amnesia), he’s established himself as a specialist in female-led comedy, following up with The Heat and now Spy. In interviews prior to Bridesmaids‘ release, he mused that the film better not bomb or he’d have messed it up for women in comedy for decades. If none […]
See full article at Filmmaker Magazine »

Spy: The Third Feature by Paul Feig, Our George Cukor

During his career, George Cukor was often referred to as a “women’s director” for his facility with foregrounded female performers: Katharine Hepburn in no less than 10 collaborations, Jean Simmons in The Actress, the women in The Women. By that logic, Paul Feig is our Cukor: beginning with Bridesmaids (since we’ve confined I Am David and Unaccompanied Minors to the rubble of collective amnesia), he’s established himself as a specialist in female-led comedy, following up with The Heat and now Spy. In interviews prior to Bridesmaids‘ release, he mused that the film better not bomb or he’d have messed it up for women in comedy for decades. If none […]
See full article at Filmmaker Magazine_Director Interviews »

Costume Stories, This Week: Oitnb and Legend

A few costume design links on this fine day.

Orange is the New Black

Jenn Rogien talks about this season’s costumes.

Colleen Atwood

She’s making handbags now, which, perhaps unsurprisingly, look a bit like a cross between Fendi and Hermès.

Jem and the Holograms

Soyon An is the stylist tasked with bringing the best dressed cartoon of all time to life.

The Women

Kay Noske nails it again with this post about Adrian’s brilliant and totally bonkers costumes.

Pretty Little Liars

Video: Even if you haven’t seen the show (it’s huge in the Us), this interview with uber cool costume designer Mandi Line is well worth four minutes of your time.

Maleficent

Costumes from Maleficent that look magnificent. Sorry.

Designing Hollywood

Tyranny of Style contributor Brianne Gillen visits the Fidm Museum, which is presently celebrating the overlooked art of costume sketches. A few photographs of the finally realised garments too.
See full article at Clothes on Film »
An error has occured. Please try again.

See also

Showtimes | External Sites


Recently Viewed