Dorothy Gale is swept away from a farm in Kansas to a magical land of Oz in a tornado and embarks on a quest with her new friends to see the Wizard who can help her return home to Kansas and help her friends as well.

Directors:

Victor Fleming, George Cukor (uncredited) | 4 more credits »

Writers:

Noel Langley (screenplay), Florence Ryerson (screenplay) | 3 more credits »
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Popularity
108 ( 434)
Won 2 Oscars. Another 11 wins & 16 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Complete credited cast:
Judy Garland ... Dorothy
Frank Morgan ... Professor Marvel / The Wizard of Oz / The Gatekeeper / The Carriage Driver / The Guard
Ray Bolger ... 'Hunk' / The Scarecrow
Bert Lahr ... 'Zeke' / The Cowardly Lion
Jack Haley ... 'Hickory' / The Tin Man
Billie Burke ... Glinda
Margaret Hamilton ... Miss Gulch / The Wicked Witch of the West
Charley Grapewin ... Uncle Henry
Pat Walshe Pat Walshe ... Nikko
Clara Blandick ... Auntie Em
Terry ... Toto (as Toto)
The Singer Midgets ... The Munchkins (as The Munchkins)
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Storyline

When a tornado rips through Kansas, Dorothy and her dog, Toto, are whisked away in their house to the magical land of Oz. They follow the Yellow Brick Road toward the Emerald City to meet the Wizard, and en route they meet a Scarecrow that needs a brain, a Tin Man missing a heart, and a Cowardly Lion who wants courage. The wizard asks the group to bring him the broom of the Wicked Witch of the West to earn his help. Written by Jwelch5742

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

We're off to see the Wizard, the wonderful [Wizard of Oz]! (UK release) See more »


Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated PG for some scary moments | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Munchkin Mickey Carroll's agent was able to negotiate the actor's salary so that he was getting paid per week nearly the same amount as Judy Garland. The agent in question was none other than former stage/film comedian Zeppo Marx, who at the time ran one of the most successful theatrical agencies in Hollywood. See more »

Goofs

At the end of "Follow The Yellow Brick Road," Dorothy turns to wave back at the Munchkins. In the lower right, you can see the matte painting of flowers covering the top of the heads of several Munchkins waving back. See more »

Quotes

[first lines]
Dorothy: She isn't coming yet, Toto. Did she hurt you? She tried to, didn't she? Come on. We'll go tell Uncle Henry and Auntie Em.
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Crazy Credits

In the opening credits, The Singer Midgets, who portray the Munchkins, are not billed under their real name, but as simply The Munchkins. In the cast list at the end, they are billed as The Singer Midgets. None of the actors who play Munchkins are given an individual credit. In the posters and advertising publicity for the film, the group was billed as The Munchkins. See more »

Alternate Versions

For the 2013 75th Anniversary IMAX 3D re-release, the film opens with IMAX's traditional "Countdown" intro, except here, it is tinted in sepia tone to match the opening/closing credits and Kansas scenes. This helped increase the hype for the film's magical transition from 2D to 3D within the countdown intro's first seconds and further enhanced the anticipation for the switch to Technicolor later on. After the closing cast list screen (there are no credits for the film's 3D conversion and restoration), the IMAX "Quality Counts" slate and MPAA rating screen are also tinted in sepia tone. These elements don't appear on the 75th Anniversary 3D Blu-ray edition of the film. See more »

Connections

Referenced in Naked (1993) See more »

Soundtracks

Scherzo in E Minor, Op. 16, No. 2
(1829) (uncredited)
Written by Felix Mendelssohn Bartholdy
Played by The MGM Symphony Orchestra conducted by Herbert Stothart
Heard as background music during the scene in which Toto escapes from the Witch's castle and runs to fetch Dorothy's three friends
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User Reviews

a milestone
12 November 2004 | by rzajacSee all my reviews

People talk about The Wizard of Oz as a backdrop to their lives; and how true that is. I just saw it again, DVD, for the first time in--gosh!--20 years. There was a little art house in Lansing Michigan USA that ran it back then, on the popular premise that there's nothing like TWoO on "the big screen." That's the last time I'd seen it, 'til today.

I guess the part that "gets" me about the movie is how the writers made it pretty plain that the Scarecrow, Tin Man, and Cowardly Lion really already had what they thought they were missing; that their respective problems were in misapprehending their own complete natures. That's a powerful statement for many of us. I found myself most touched in scenes where the Scarecrow was showing wisdom, the Tin Man feeling deeply ("...when I think of Dorothy in that awful place..."), and the Lion...well, maybe accomplishing this effect was harder in his case...what *is* true courage?

Anyway, if you're reading this here, you must be a movie weenie, and you've no doubt already seen the movie, so I'm not going to recite the usual "go see this movie" mantra.

I was just very touching to see this movie again, at this phase in my life.

I will mention a few more things about how I now see this movie as a "growed up" (I'm almost 50): It's interesting how you can see the production values of the time; the lot sets and special effects and so forth. This movie is a powerful example of how a good story overcomes limited means in other areas.

People who look back with disdain on the low-tech chintz of old movies can see in TWoO the magic ingredient; narrative solidity. And I'm not a pollyanna about this: I'm sure the underlying reality behind its making is rife with horror stories of expert disagreement, rewrites, discarding, jerryrigging, and the rest of it. But in the end, something like narrative love won out; and that's the important thing.

Oh: And having Harold Arlen write the music was good luck indeed. And orchestrations which cleverly appropriated very tasty new ideas in composition (polymodalism, non-standard phrasings, etc.) didn't hurt, either!

Geez, this movie is such a little universe....I'd better stop here.


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Frequently Asked Questions

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Details

Country:

USA

Language:

English

Release Date:

25 August 1939 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

The Wizard of Oz See more »

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Box Office

Budget:

$2,777,000 (estimated)

Opening Weekend USA:

$5,354,311, 8 November 1998

Gross USA:

$24,438,411

Cumulative Worldwide Gross:

$25,407,411
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Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Mono (Western Electric Sound System: The Voice of Action)| Dolby Digital (2005 re-issue)

Color:

Color | Black and White (Kansas sequences)

Aspect Ratio:

1.37 : 1
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