Stagecoach (1939) - News Poster

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Stagecoach Draws Huge Numbers of Celebrities

  • TMZ
Tons of celebs hit up Stagecoach this weekend outside Palm Springs ... and it lived up to the previous festival with a bullet. Kelsea Ballerini, Shawn Johnson East, Joe Jonas, Nick JonasPatrick Schwarzenegger, Jake Owens, Guy Fieri, Mason Ramsey,  Tanya TuckerMorgan EvansLindsay Ell, Chris Lane and lots more enjoyed the sunshine and cool nights at the country music festival. Florida Georgia Line headlined Friday night, bringing out Jason Derulo and Yodel Kid Mason Ramsey.
See full article at TMZ »

The Forgotten: Ozploitation

  • MUBI
It's been said of L. Frank Baum, perhaps not quite fairly, that everything he ever did involving the fantasy kingdom of Oz was a huge success, and everything he did without it was a calamitous disaster. Certainly he made a bit of money late in life as the producer of Oz-themed silent movies, before he died and his son bankrupted the company, showing that only one Baum had the magic touch.The first Oz short of 1910, Dorothy and the Scarecrow in Oz is actually the closest, plot-wise, to the familiar 1939 version, and it has a cool cast, including nine-year-old Bebe Daniels as Dorothy and future director Norman Z. McLeod as the Scarecrow. But Baum really hit his stride as a mogul four years later, with the release of three feature films, in the year when features had only just started appearing in America. And His Majesty the Scarecrow of Oz,
See full article at MUBI »

Oscar history: Best Picture winners chosen by preferential ballot (1934-1945) include classic films

Oscar history: Best Picture winners chosen by preferential ballot (1934-1945) include classic films
In 2009 — when the Academy Awards went to 10 Best Picture nominees for the first time since 1943 — the preferential system of voting, which had been used from 1934 to 1945, was reintroduced. The academy did so as it believed this “best allows the collective judgment of all voting members to be most accurately represented.”

We have detailed how the preferential voting system works at the Oscars in the modern era. So, let’s take a look back at those dozen years early in the history of the academy when it first used this complicated counting to determine the Best Picture winner rather than a simple popular vote. (At the bottom of this post, be sure to vote for the film that you think will take the top Oscar this year.)

See Best Picture Gallery: Every winner of the top Academy Award

1934

This seventh ceremony marked the first time that the Oscars eligibility period was the calendar year.
See full article at Gold Derby »

Sam Rockwell (‘Three Billboards’) would be sixth Best Supporting Actor Oscar champ to beat a co-star

Sam Rockwell (‘Three Billboards’) would be sixth Best Supporting Actor Oscar champ to beat a co-star
“Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri” ended a 26-year drought in Best Supporting Actor, producing two nominees, Woody Harrelson and Sam Rockwell, from the same film for the first time since “Bugsy” (1991) stars Harvey Keitel and Ben Kingsley lost to Jack Palance (“City Slickers”). By all appearances, it’s smooth sailing for Rockwell for the win, which would be the sixth time a Best Supporting Actor winner defeated a co-star in 18 dual duels.

“Mr. Smith Goes to Washington” (1939) stars Harry Carey and Claude Rains were the first co-stars to be nominated against each other in Best Supporting Actor, but they lost to Thomas Mitchell for “Stagecoach.” It would be another 32 years — with seven pairs of double nominees in between — before a Best Supporting Actor champ, Ben Johnson, beat a co-star, Jeff Bridges, for 1971’s “The Last Picture Show.”

Three years later, Robert De Niro prevailed over fellow “The Godfather Part II
See full article at Gold Derby »

2018 Oscars: Michael Stuhlbarg is the sixth actor to appear in three Best Picture nominees in the same year

2018 Oscars: Michael Stuhlbarg is the sixth actor to appear in three Best Picture nominees in the same year
Michael Stuhlbarg may not have received an Oscar nomination Tuesday, but he did join a very exclusive club: He’s the sixth performer to appear in three Best Picture nominees in the same year and the first to do so in 15 years.

Stuhlbarg had supporting roles in “Call Me by Your Name,” “The Post” and “The Shape of Water” — a third of the nine-nominee Best Picture lineup. The last person to accomplish this feat was John C. Reilly for his 2002 slate of “Chicago,” “Gangs of New York” and “The Hours.” Before Reilly, you have to go all the way back to the ‘30s for the first four instances. They are:

1934: Claudette Colbert, “It Happened One Night,” “Cleopatra” and “Imitation of Life

1935: Charles Laughton, “Mutiny on the Bounty,” “Les Miserables” and “Ruggles of Red Gap

1937: Adolphe Menjou, “One Hundred Men and a Girl,” “Stage Door” and “A Star Is Born

1939: Thomas Mitchell,
See full article at Gold Derby »

‘The Ballad of Lefty Brown’ Director Jared Moshé Shares His Favorite Westerns

‘The Ballad of Lefty Brown’ Director Jared Moshé Shares His Favorite Westerns
The Western is the quintessential American movie genre. Its iconography has been seared into our collective conscious: the solitary cowboy riding the endless frontier, towns struggling to survive in a lawless land, the quick-drawing gunfighter. Generations of filmmakers have engaged with those symbols, building an entire cinematic language on a genre that began with the simple premise of good “white hats” vs. bad “black hats.” In doing so, they have created mythologies, torn down legends and subverted what it means to be an American.

My exposure to the West began in the living room of my parents’ house. My father, a Sephardic Jew born and raised in Greece, shared with me the movies he loved as a child. Over the years my enthusiasm for the genre only grew as I became a history buff, a lover of myths, and eventually a filmmaker. In interviews, I’m often asked to name my favorite Western,
See full article at Indiewire »

The Criterion Collection Announces January 2018 Titles, Including ‘The Breakfast Club’ and ‘I, Daniel Blake’

  • Indiewire
A brain, an athlete, a basket case, a princess, and a criminal are all joining the Criterion Collection in 2018. “The Breakfast Club” is getting the Criterion treatment next January, as are a new edition of “Young Mr. Lincoln,” “I, Daniel Blake,” “Westfront 1918,” “Kameradschaft,” and four films by Claude Autant-Lara.

More information — and, as always, cover art — below.

Read More:Criterion Collection Announces December Titles, Including ‘Election’ and ‘Monterey Pop

The Breakfast Club

“What happens when you put five strangers in Saturday detention? Badass posturing, gleeful misbehavior, and a potent dose of angst. With this exuberant film, writer-director John Hughes established himself as the bard of American youth, vividly and empathetically capturing how teenagers hang out, act up, and goof off. ‘The Breakfast Club’ brings together an assortment of adolescent archetypes — the uptight prom queen (Molly Ringwald), the stoic jock (Emilio Estevez), the foul-mouthed rebel (Judd Nelson), the virginal bookworm (Anthony Michael Hall
See full article at Indiewire »

All of the Films Joining FilmStruck’s Criterion Channel this August

Each month, the fine folks at FilmStruck and the Criterion Collection spend countless hours crafting their channels to highlight the many different types of films that they have in their streaming library. This August will feature an exciting assortment of films, as noted below.

To sign up for a free two-week trial here.

Tuesday, August 1

Tuesday’s Short + Feature: These Boots and Mystery Train

Music is at the heart of this program, which pairs a zany music video by Finnish master Aki Kaurismäki with a tune-filled career highlight from American independent-film pioneer Jim Jarmusch. In the 1993 These Boots, Kaurismäki’s band of pompadoured “Finnish Elvis” rockers, the Leningrad Cowboys, cover a Nancy Sinatra classic in their signature deadpan style. It’s the perfect prelude to Jarmusch’s 1989 Mystery Train, a homage to the King of Rock ‘n’ Roll and the musical legacy of Memphis, featuring appearances by Screamin’ Jay Hawkins and Joe Strummer.
See full article at CriterionCast »

Podcast Talk: Rebecca Fons on Reopening the Iowa Theater in Winterset on May 25, 2017

Chicago – When Rebecca Fons, the former Education Manager of the Chicago International Film Festival, was getting married to Jack C. Newell – a prominent Chicago film director – her mother Marianne told her something that would change the course of their lives. Fons’ hometown movie theater, the “Iowa,” was about to offered for sale. In the equivalent of the recent Matt Damon family film favorite, Rebecca and Marianne Fons was about to star in their version of “We Bought a Movie Theater.”

Rebecca Fons has been a mover and shaker within the Chicago cinema scene. She was the Education Manager for the Chicago International Film Festival for nine years, and participates in a number of screening committees for film festivals across the country. She received her Bachelors and Masters degrees from Columbia College here, and serves in various capacities with the Steppenwolf Theatre, the Gene Siskel Film Center and the Junior League of Chicago.
See full article at HollywoodChicago.com »

Criterion Now – Episode 13 – Cannes 2017, John Ford, Jerks in Film

This week we get into the gutter with Dave Eves and James Hancock as we play a game about the biggest jerks on film. We also talk about the lineup from Cannes, Michael Ballhaus, John Ford, Sam Peckinpah, and the latest from FilmStruck.

Episode Notes

7:45 – Jerks in Film

22:30 – R.I.P. Michael Ballhaus

26:00 – Cannes 2017

34:30 – Wishlist and Predictions for July Releases

38:30 – Short Takes (Dry Summer, Straw Dogs, Stagecoach)

49:00 – FilmStruck

Episode Links Wrong Reel 230 – Dave Eves and His Criterion Top Five Wrong Reel 249 – Disaster Movies of the 1970s Eclipse Viewer 54 – Duvivier in the 1930s Part One Michael Ballhaus Dies at 81 Cannes 2017 Lineup All of the Films Joining FilmStruck this April Episode Credits Aaron West: Twitter | Website | Letterboxd Dave Eves: Twitter James Hancock: Twitter | Podcast Criterion Now: Twitter Criterion Cast: Facebook | Twitter

Music for the show is from Fatboy Roberts’ Geek Remixed project.
See full article at CriterionCast »

The 25 most iconic movie entrances

Robert Keeling Apr 25, 2017

Saluting the movie characters who make an impression, the minute they appear on the screen...

One thing that unites all of cinema’s most iconic characters is that they were able to make a memorable first impression. Whether it’s bursting onto the scene in a flurry of noise or slowly skulking their way into shot, there’s a fine art to ensuring a character makes an instant impact on screen. An iconic entrance is not just about a momentary impact however, it can also emphasise a character’s importance and help to cement their influence over the rest of the movie.

See related Westworld episode 10 review: The Bicameral Mind Westworld episode 9 review: The Well-Tempered Clavier

There are any number of contributory factors that can be blended together in order to make an entrance truly memorable. These include the accompanying music, the choice of camera shot, the
See full article at Den of Geek »

Ridiculous Movie Stunts: The Landmark Moments

Author: Rob Keeling

With Fast and the Furious 8 due out in cinemas this week, it seems only right that we look back at some of the landmark moments in the proud history of ridiculous stunts. The Fast and the Furious movie franchise is one which has firmly embraced the “more is more” approach to set pieces and stunts and while in its infancy it made do with garish cars racing quickly, it now parachutes them out of planes and drives them from building to building.

Since the early days of cinema though, filmmakers have been going to great lengths to make their action sequences really impress:

Safety Last! (1923) – The clock face

In this aptly titled silent comedy, star Harold Lloyd was playing an employee climbing the outside of his work’s building as part of a publicity stunt. How did they make this feat look so realistic with 1920s technology?
See full article at HeyUGuys »

Giveaway – Win My Darling Clementine on Blu-ray

To celebrate the release of My Darling Clementine – on Blu-ray 27 February 2017 – we are giving away a copy courtesy of Arrow Video!

Wyatt Earp has long fascinated filmmakers. Actors from Burt Lancaster and James Stewart to Kurt Russell and Kevin Costner have played the legendary gunfighter, but no portrayal is more definitive that Henry Fonda’s in My Darling Clementine.

John Ford’s first Western since his seminal Stagecoach, My Darling Clementine ranks among the director’s finest. Telling the story of the Gunfight at the O.K. Corral, and the friendship between Earp and Doc Holliday, Ford renders this famous tale into a lyrical masterpiece, filmed in his beloved Monument Valley and full of iconic moments.

Order via Amazon.

The competition closes at midnight on Sunday, March 12th. UK readers only please. To enter, use one of the following methods…

a Rafflecopter giveaway

This competition is promoted by Fetch Publicity. By
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

Gentleman of letters by Anne-Katrin Titze

Gay Talese on James Baldwin: "Baldwin had his words and his voice in the forefront of the change in American politics."

In the 1960s, Gay Talese developed a friendship with James Baldwin when they were regular contributors to Esquire magazine along with Norman Mailer, Tom Wolfe, Gore Vidal, William F Buckley Jr, and others and he stayed in touch with Baldwin until his death in 1987. In Raoul Peck's I Am Not Your Negro, James Baldwin's writing is voiced by Samuel L Jackson over clips from movies that include an Indian-shooting John Wayne in John Ford's Stagecoach, Harry Beaumont's Dance, Fools, Dance with a tap dancing Joan Crawford, Sydney Poitier and Rod Steiger's goodbye in Norman Jewison's In The Heat Of The Night, and Richard Widmark's breakdown in Joseph L Mankiewicz's No Way Out.

Anne-Katrin Titze captures High Notes author Gay Talese Photo:
See full article at eyeforfilm.co.uk »

Gentleman of letters by Anne-Katrin Titze

In the 1960s, Gay Talese developed a friendship with James Baldwin when they were regular contributors to Esquire magazine along with Norman Mailer, Tom Wolfe, Gore Vidal, William F Buckley Jr, and others and he stayed in touch with Baldwin until his death in 1987. In Raoul Peck's I Am Not Your Negro, James Baldwin's writing is voiced by Samuel L Jackson over clips from movies that include an Indian-shooting John Wayne in John Ford's Stagecoach, Harry Beaumont's Dance, Fools, Dance with a tap dancing Joan Crawford, Sydney Poitier and Rod Steiger's goodbye in Norman Jewison's In The Heat Of The Night, and Richard Widmark's breakdown in Joseph L Mankiewicz's No Way Out.

Gay Talese notes that one of the New Yorker's great achievements was when editor William Shawn published James Baldwin's Letter From A Region In My Mind. Truman Capote's In Cold.
See full article at eyeforfilm.co.uk »

The Perfect Holiday Gift For That Movie Lover In Your Life! "John Wayne: The Epic Collection", 40 Film Warner Home Video Tribute With Exclusive Duke Wayne Belt Buckle From Amazon

  • CinemaRetro
Now At A Reduced Price! Only $61.00 Through Amazon...Original Price Was $149.00- Free Shipping For Prime Members.

Time to put up your Dukes! (DVDs, that is!)

DVD Collection Of 40 Warner And Parmount Films Is Largest John Wayne Box Set Ever

Includes Hours Of Special Features And Remarkable Memorabilia

Amazon Buyers Get Exclusive Wayne Belt Buckle

Here is the original press release from when the set was originally made available:

To commemorate one of America’s most iconic film heroes, Warner Bros. Home Entertainment will introduce a comprehensive new DVD set -- John Wayne: The Epic Collection -- on May 20. The spring release, just in time for Father’s Day gift-giving, will contain 38 discs with 40 Wayne films (full list below), including The Searchers, once called one of the most influential movies in American history[1] and the film for which Wayne won his Best Actor Academy Award®, True Grit (1969). The collection
See full article at CinemaRetro »

Drive-In Dust Offs: The Monster That Challenged The World (1957)

When the mood strikes, there’s nothing better than an Atomic Age Monster Movie (B Division). Glorious black & white, damsels in distress, iron willed heroes and rubberized villains never fail to hit all the pleasure centers. The Monster that Challenged the World (1957) is one such film, and better made than most of the era. As the tagline says, “A New Kind of Terror to Numb the Nerves!” Well, you may just feel a tingle, but it’s a blast nevertheless.

Released by United Artists in the States in June and rolled out to the rest of the world in ’58, Monster was produced for $250,000; a fair chunk of change for Gramercy Pictures, run by producers Arthur Gardner, Jules V. Levy and director Arnold Laven - they also produced the same year’s The Vampire (read my Dust Off here). And the price tag shows too; Monster is as polished looking as
See full article at DailyDead »

[Ciff Review] I Am Not Your Negro

In 2016, I Am Not Your Negro is perhaps destined to be tethered to other recent pieces of racially charged social advocacy, 13th and Oj: Made In America, but Raoul Peck’s film is less about outlining a history of disproportion than a persistent state of being. It’s a conversation between James Baldwin’s unfinished work, Remember This House, and the modern national horror, but the evidence here is more intrinsically spiritual than fact-based, and, in the process, Peck has made one of this year’s finest documentaries. At once pulsing with anger and yearning for compassion, it’s an examination of past and present America as a cycle where the backdrop has changed and particulars have remained the same.

I Am Not Your Negro‘s background further adds to the holiness around the text, as Baldwin was only able to write thirty pages of his last book: a personal
See full article at The Film Stage »

Ed Zwick interview: Jack Reacher: Never Go Back

Wil Jones Oct 24, 2016

We chat to Edward Zwick, director of Jack Reacher 2, about modern cinema, the erosion of mid-budget cinema and more...

Tom Cruise returns this week as Jack Reacher, the ex-military badass from Lee Child’s popular series of novels. The first Jack Reacher was a great throwback to classic 90s action movies, that felt like a return to an era before superheroes and CGI overloads dominated blockbusters, and Tom Cruise running away from things and punching people was all we needed. And the sequel Jack Reacher: Never Go Back thankfully keeps that tradition.

Stepping into the director’s chair this time is Ed Zwick (replacing Christopher McQuarrie, who moved over to the Mission Impossible franchise). Zwick is the sort of Hollywood journeyman who’s name on a film is alway a good sign. He’s made movies like Courage Under Fire, The Siege, The Last Samurai, Blood Diamond,
See full article at Den of Geek »

Review: "The Conqueror" (1956) Starring John Wayne And Susan Hayward; Universal Vault DVD Release

  • CinemaRetro
By Doug Oswald

Released as a burn-to-order DVD from the Universal Vault Series, some may be quick to add that they should have kept “The Conqueror” in the vault. The movie is notorious for being one of the worst movies in Hollywood history. Much has been written about how terrible this movie is so I’m going to avoid jumping on that bandwagon. After all, calling this movie bad is like calling out water for being wet.

The movie is also a part of a conspiracy theory of sorts because many of the cast and crew died from cancer and some have connected those cancer deaths to the location filming in St. George Utah which was the stand-in for the Gobi Desert. St. George is downwind from where the above ground nuclear testing occurred in Nevada. Indeed, many involved with this movie did succumb to cancer including lifetime smoker John Wayne
See full article at CinemaRetro »
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