7.8/10
42,444
401 user 104 critic

Stagecoach (1939)

Passed | | Adventure, Drama, Western | 3 March 1939 (USA)
Trailer
3:29 | Trailer
A group of people traveling on a stagecoach find their journey complicated by the threat of Geronimo and learn something about each other in the process.

Director:

John Ford

Writers:

Ernest Haycox (original story), Dudley Nichols (screen play)
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Popularity
4,620 ( 3,670)
Won 2 Oscars. Another 6 wins & 7 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Complete credited cast:
Claire Trevor ... Dallas
John Wayne ... Ringo Kid
Andy Devine ... Buck
John Carradine ... Hatfield
Thomas Mitchell ... Doc Josiah Boone
Louise Platt ... Mrs. Lucy Mallory
George Bancroft ... Marshal Curley Wilcox
Donald Meek ... Samuel Peacock
Berton Churchill ... Ellsworth Henry Gatewood
Tim Holt ... Lt. Blanchard
Tom Tyler ... Luke Plummer
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Storyline

A simple stagecoach trip is complicated by the fact that Geronimo is on the warpath in the area. The passengers on the coach include a drunken doctor, two women, a bank manager who has taken off with his client's money, and the famous Ringo Kid, among others. Written by Andrew Hyatt <dres@uiuc.edu>

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

Men -and Women- on the last frontier of wickedness! See more »


Certificate:

Passed | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

One of two dozen Walter Wanger / Harry Sherman / Cinema Guild productions, initially released by United Artists. The movie was then re-released theatrically in 1948 by Masterpiece Productions, who ultimately sold the movie for U.S television syndication in 1950. It was first telecast on Sunday 14 May 1950 in Los Angeles on KTLA (Channel 5); on Monday 15 May 1950 in Chicago on WENR (Channel 7); in Albuquerque on Tuesday 1 August 1950 on KOB (Channel 4); in New York City on Saturday 5 August 1950 on WCBS; in Detroit on Sunday 6 August 1950, on WXYZ (Channel 7); in Atlanta on Thursday 14 September 1950, on WSB (Channel 8); in Philadelphia on Saturday 16 September 1950, on WFIL (Channel 6); in Cincinnati on Saturday, 30 September 1950, on WKRC (Channel 11); in Phoenix on Wednesday 4 October 1950, on KPHO (Channel 5); in Boston on Sunday 22 October 1950, on WNAC (Channel 7); and on Saturday 4 November 1950, in San Francisco on KGO (Channel 7). See more »

Goofs

As Dallas announces "It's a little girl", her lips don't move. See more »

Quotes

[first lines]
Cavalry scout: These hills here are full of Apaches. They've burnt every ranch building in sight.
[referring to Indian scout]
Cavalry scout: He had a brush with them last night. Says they're being stirred up by Geronimo.
Capt. Sickel: Geronimo? How do we know he isn't lying?
Cavalry scout: No, he's a Cheyenne. They hate Apaches worse than we do.
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Alternate Versions

Also available in a computer-colorized version. See more »

Connections

Featured in John Wayne Made Me Cry: Our Western Heros (2002) See more »

Soundtracks

She's More to Be Pitied than Censured
(uncredited)
American folk song
Used in the score
See more »

User Reviews

 
Great ensemble western
6 May 2004 | by ninazeroSee all my reviews

I grew up watching the old, crotchety, gruff John Wayne, the iconic hero of the right wing, and even though I'd seen some of his early films on television, I'd forgotten what a sexy and compelling presence he had when a young man. It's easy to see while watching his performance how this film made him a star. As great as Wayne is in this film, he doesn't overshadow any of his fellow performers. Thomas Mitchell plays the drunken doctor thrown out of town, a performance that earned him an Academy Award. Andy Devine is hilarious as the complaining, squeaky voiced stagecoach driver. John Carradine is sleek and snake-like as the gambler. Claire Trevor gives a heartbreaking turn as the good-hearted whore thrown out of town by pious hypocrites. Donald Meek plays his name, a meek whiskey salesman befriended by the whiskey-loving Doc. Each actor quickly and deftly sketches his character so vividly that every performance is memorable.

But the real star of the show is John Ford, the director. To introduce and define nine characters in the context of a fast-paced western is no easy task, and he accomplishes it in masterly fashion. Much of the action takes place in the limited confines of a stagecoach, but Ford takes advantage of the limits by staging brilliant and subtle bits between characters; John Wayne casts sultry glances at Clare Trevor, who blossoms under his glance, the young calvary wife's eyes glaze over as the banker pontificates, and Doc sneaks sips of whiskey from the samples case while he solicitously keeps the wind from chilling the whiskey salesman. When the action moves outside, he films the action in dynamic angles and stunts that were the most daring of its time.

If you enjoy westerns and haven't seen this, you have a great night of film-watching ahead of you. And if the last time you saw Stagecoach was some midnight years ago when you wandered home for a bit of the late show before bedtime, watch it again and rediscover what a great western it is


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Details

Country:

USA

Language:

English | Spanish | French

Release Date:

3 March 1939 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

Stagecoach See more »

Filming Locations:

Santa Clarita, California, USA See more »

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Box Office

Budget:

$392,000 (estimated)
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Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Mono (Western Electric Mirrophonic Recording)

Aspect Ratio:

1.37 : 1
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