8.1/10
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Mr. Smith Goes to Washington (1939)

Passed | | Comedy, Drama | 19 October 1939 (USA)
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1:37 | Trailer
A naive man is appointed to fill a vacancy in the United States Senate. His plans promptly collide with political corruption, but he doesn't back down.

Director:

Frank Capra

Writers:

Sidney Buchman (screen play), Lewis R. Foster (story)
Top Rated Movies #206 | Won 1 Oscar. Another 5 wins & 16 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Jean Arthur ... Saunders
James Stewart ... Jefferson Smith
Claude Rains ... Senator Joseph Paine
Edward Arnold ... Jim Taylor
Guy Kibbee ... Governor Hopper
Thomas Mitchell ... Diz Moore
Eugene Pallette ... Chick McGann
Beulah Bondi ... Ma Smith
H.B. Warner ... Senate Majority Leader
Harry Carey ... President of the Senate
Astrid Allwyn ... Susan Paine
Ruth Donnelly ... Mrs. Hopper
Grant Mitchell ... Senator MacPherson
Porter Hall ... Senator Monroe
H.V. Kaltenborn H.V. Kaltenborn ... H.V. Kaltenborn
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Storyline

Naive and idealistic Jefferson Smith, leader of the Boy Rangers, is appointed on a lark by the spineless governor of his state. He is reunited with the state's senior senator--presidential hopeful and childhood hero, Senator Joseph Paine. In Washington, however, Smith discovers many of the shortcomings of the political process as his earnest goal of a national boys' camp leads to a conflict with the state political boss, Jim Taylor. Taylor first tries to corrupt Smith and then later attempts to destroy Smith through a scandal. Written by James Yu <jamestyu@ccwf.cc.utexas.edu>

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

Capra's Greatest Hit --- The Screen At Its Most Inspired! See more »

Genres:

Comedy | Drama

Certificate:

Passed | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Near the beginning of the film, when Smith is appointed a senator, a joyful crowd sings "Auld Lang Syne" for James Stewart. The same song is sung for him by another joyful crowd at the end of "It's a Wonderful Life" (1946). [Note that neither film specifically references the other, and there is no appropriate category under "Movie Connections".] See more »

Goofs

(at around 17 mins) At the train station, Jeff Smith is approached by Susan Payne and three other women. They ask for a dollar contribution each for the Milk Fund. Jeff Smith says "five dollars". It should only be four dollars. Soon after, reporters ask him about the women in Washington. He responds that four came up to him at the train depot. See more »

Quotes

Governor Hopper: That settles it! I will not be attacked and belittled by my own children in my own home! Oh, my nerves are strained to the breaking point!
Mrs. Hopper: Oh, Hubert.
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Connections

Featured in Claudette Colbert - Discovering: James Stewart (2011) See more »

Soundtracks

O Bury Me Not On the Lone Prairie
Traditional cowboy song
In the score when Smith and Paine reminisce, and later when Smith is at the Lincoln Memorial at night
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User Reviews

Want to Get Your View Across? Why Not Filibuster?
30 April 2004 | by tfrizzellSee all my reviews

The media and those in Washington, D.C. cringed in 1939 when Frank Capra (Oscar-nominated for directing) come out with "Mr. Smith Goes to Washington". Capra, fresh off amazing successes like "Lady for a Day", "It Happened One Night", "Mr. Deeds Goes to Town", "Lost Horizon" and "You Can't Take It With You", used his power to slap some bigwigs in the face with a powerful medium---the motion picture. The result was an immediate backlash by publications and politicians, but cheers from critics and the audience. As with society, the critics and the masses won out as the movie is a masterpiece in every way. A U.S. Senate vacancy leads to a dilemma. Who should be put in office? Everyone believes the apparently naive and gullible James Stewart (Oscar-nominated) is the logical choice because he will be easy to manipulate and he won't rock the boat. Stewart, the leader of the Boy Rangers (a local camp association for youngsters), gets blind-sided by many high-ranking officials who have alterior motives (Oscar nominees Harry Carey and Claude Rains in particular) when his idea for a national boys' camp goes by the wayside. Thus the only thing left for Stewart is to beat those in charge by beating them at their own game---creating a filibuster (a never-ending governmental argument for his cause). Stewart is solid as always here and the supporters (love interest/reporter Jean Arthur and drunk newspaper man Thomas Mitchell included with the aforementioned players) are all terrific throughout. The Oscar-winning screenplay is deceptively intelligent and Capra just had the uncanny ability to mix comedy, drama and interpersonal characterizations together to make consistently wonderful American film experiences. 5 stars out of 5.


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Frequently Asked Questions

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Details

Country:

USA

Language:

English

Release Date:

19 October 1939 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

Frank Capra's Mr. Smith Goes to Washington See more »

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Box Office

Budget:

$1,900,000 (estimated)

Opening Weekend USA:

$83,205, 14 October 2018

Gross USA:

$144,738

Cumulative Worldwide Gross:

$144,738
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

Production Co:

Columbia Pictures See more »
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Technical Specs

Runtime:

| (TV)

Sound Mix:

Mono (Western Electric Mirrophonic Recording)

Aspect Ratio:

1.37 : 1
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