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Gone with the Wind (1939)

Passed | | Drama, History, Romance | 17 January 1940 (USA)
Trailer
1:56 | Trailer
A manipulative woman and a roguish man conduct a turbulent romance during the American Civil War and Reconstruction periods.

Directors:

Victor Fleming, George Cukor (uncredited) | 1 more credit »

Writers:

Margaret Mitchell (story of the Old South "Gone with the Wind"), Sidney Howard (screen play by)
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Popularity
977 ( 125)
Top Rated Movies #168 | Won 8 Oscars. Another 12 wins & 12 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Thomas Mitchell ... Gerald O'Hara
Barbara O'Neil ... Ellen - His Wife (as Barbara O'Neill)
Vivien Leigh ... Scarlett - Their Daughter
Evelyn Keyes ... Suellen - Their Daughter
Ann Rutherford ... Carreen - Their Daughter
George Reeves ... Stuart Tarleton - Scarlett's Beau
Fred Crane ... Brent Tarleton - Scarlett's Beau
Hattie McDaniel ... Mammy - House Servant
Oscar Polk ... Pork - House Servant
Butterfly McQueen ... Prissy - House Servant
Victor Jory ... Jonas Wilkerson - Field Overseer
Everett Brown ... Big Sam - Field Foreman
Howard Hickman ... John Wilkes
Alicia Rhett ... India - His Daughter
Leslie Howard ... Ashley - His Son
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Storyline

Scarlett is a woman who can deal with a nation at war, Atlanta burning, the Union Army carrying off everything from her beloved Tara, the carpetbaggers who arrive after the war. Scarlett is beautiful. She has vitality. But Ashley, the man she has wanted for so long, is going to marry his placid cousin, Melanie. Mammy warns Scarlett to behave herself at the party at Twelve Oaks. There is a new man there that day, the day the Civil War begins. Rhett Butler. Scarlett does not know he is in the room when she pleads with Ashley to choose her instead of Melanie. Written by Dale O'Connor <daleoc@interaccess.com>

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

The greatest romance of all time! See more »

Genres:

Drama | History | Romance | War

Certificate:

Passed | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Leslie Howard was one of the few cast members not to attend the premiere in Atlanta. He returned to England before the premiere due to the outbreak of WW2. He served in British intelligence in WW2. Despite this, or perhaps because of it, he made three films during wartime, "the 49th Parallel" (1941), "Pimpernel Smith" (1941) and "First of the Few" (1942). Each of these were known for their pro-Allied slant. In 1943 Howard was touring Portugal and Spain lecturing on film. He and his agent took a KLM/BOAC Flight 777 back to England. On June 1, 1943 this plane, a DC-3, was shot down by Ju-88C8 maritime fighters. See more »

Goofs

When Scarlett is attacked on the bridge, her hat disappears and reappears between shots. See more »

Quotes

[first lines]
Brent Tarleton: What do we care if we *were* expelled from college, Scarlett? The war is gonna start any day now, so we'd have left college anyhow.
Stuart Tarleton: War! Isn't it exciting, Scarlett? You know those fool Yankees actually *want* a war?
Brent Tarleton: We'll show 'em!
Scarlett: Fiddle-dee-dee! War, war, war; this war talk's spoiling all the fun at every party this spring. I get so bored I could scream. Besides... there isn't going to be any war.
Brent Tarleton: Not going to be any war?
Stuart Tarleton: Why, honey, of course there's gonna be a war.
Scarlett: If either of you ...
[...]
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Crazy Credits

Rather than simply saying "Selznick International in association with Metro-Goldwyn Mayer presents Margaret Mitchell's 'Gone With the Wind'", the opening credits say "Selznick International in association with Metro-Goldwyn Mayer has the honor to present its Technicolor production of Margaret Mitchell's story of the Old South 'Gone With the Wind'". See more »

Alternate Versions

Originally shot in a 1.37:1 ratio; the prints re-released in 1967 by MGM, were converted to a simulated wide screen ratio, chopping strips at the top and bottom of the image. See more »

Connections

Featured in Clark Gable: Tall, Dark and Handsome (1996) See more »

Soundtracks

Go Down Moses (Let My People Go)
(uncredited)
Traditional Negro spiritual
Sung by marching negro soldiers off to fight the Yankees
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User Reviews

 
A rich romantic film...
26 April 2008 | by Nazi_Fighter_DavidSee all my reviews

Gerard O'Hara (Thomas Mitchell), an Irish immigrant, settles in North Georgia and becomes a prosperous plantation owner… By great luck he marries young Ellen Robillard (Barbara O'Neill) of Savannah, the daughter of one of the noblest Georgian families and becomes accepted by his aristocratic neighbors… They are blessed with three daughters, Scarlett (Vivien Leigh), Suellen (Evelyn Keyes), and Carreen (Ann Rutherford).

Scarlett, the eldest, worships her mother… Yet, under her beauty and Southern coquetry, she is charming, but proud, willful and vain… She believes she is in love with Ashley Wilkes (Leslie Howard), a good-hearted young army captain… But Ashley loves his cousin, Melanie Hamilton (Olivia de Havilland), a delicate, selfless woman… He is frightened by Scarlett's energy and animation… And although he admits his feelings for her, he is afraid to marry her and decides to take Melanie for his bride…

When Scarlett loses Ashley she is more certain than ever that she must have him… On their wedding day, she meets Rhett Butler (Clark Gable), a wealthy adventurer from an old Charleston family… Rhett, a gambler—who believes that self-interest is the motive of all human conduct—is attracted by Scarlett's beauty and realizes that they are equally merciless and conscienceless…

Vivien Leigh is magnificent as the spoiled, selfish southern belle... She carries the picture, and controls it... She reproduces the spirited character of Scarlett in all its fluent complexity...

Clark Gable—with a smile and great light in his eyes—is fascinating as the elegant, heroic gentleman ... He is perfect as the ladies man... His dramatic high point is his scene crying in Melanie's presence... His love scenes with Scarlett give the picture a vibrancy that is one of its great attractions... The film begins with their first stormy meeting in the library at Twelve Oaks and intensifies at the Atlanta bazaar, when he shocks the confederacy by bidding $l00 "in gold," to dance with the newly widowed Mrs. Hamilton who cares for nothing but herself…

Hattie McDaniel gives a rich characterization as Mammy, Scarlett's shrewd black servant who was never fooled by Scarlett's airs and tears...

With a memorable music score by Max Steiner, the film was an instant classic, winner of eight Academy Awards...


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Frequently Asked Questions

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Details

Country:

USA

Language:

English

Release Date:

17 January 1940 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

Gone with the Wind See more »

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Box Office

Budget:

$3,977,000 (estimated)

Opening Weekend USA:

$1,192,593, 28 June 1998

Gross USA:

$200,852,579

Cumulative Worldwide Gross:

$400,176,459
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Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

| (1969 re-release) | (1985 re-release) | (1994 re-release) | (1989 re-release) | (copyright length)

Sound Mix:

Mono (Western Electric Sound System)

Color:

Color (Technicolor)

Aspect Ratio:

1.37 : 1
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