8.1/10
284,958
887 user 197 critic

Gone with the Wind (1939)

Passed | | Drama, History, Romance | 17 January 1940 (USA)
Trailer
1:56 | Trailer
A manipulative woman and a roguish man conduct a turbulent romance during the American Civil War and Reconstruction periods.

Directors:

Victor Fleming, George Cukor (uncredited) | 1 more credit »

Writers:

Margaret Mitchell (story of the old south "Gone with the Wind"), Sidney Howard (screenplay)
Reviews
Popularity
913 ( 131)
Top Rated Movies #167 | Won 8 Oscars. Another 12 wins & 12 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Thomas Mitchell ... Gerald O'Hara
Barbara O'Neil ... Ellen - His Wife (as Barbara O'Neill)
Vivien Leigh ... Scarlett - Their Daughter
Evelyn Keyes ... Suellen - Their Daughter
Ann Rutherford ... Carreen - Their Daughter
George Reeves ... Stuart Tarleton - Scarlett's Beau
Fred Crane ... Brent Tarleton - Scarlett's Beau
Hattie McDaniel ... Mammy - House Servant
Oscar Polk ... Pork - House Servant
Butterfly McQueen ... Prissy - House Servant
Victor Jory ... Jonas Wilkerson - Field Overseer
Everett Brown ... Big Sam - Field Foreman
Howard Hickman ... John Wilkes
Alicia Rhett ... India - His Daughter
Leslie Howard ... Ashley - His Son
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Storyline

Scarlett is a woman who can deal with a nation at war, Atlanta burning, the Union Army carrying off everything from her beloved Tara, the carpetbaggers who arrive after the war. Scarlett is beautiful. She has vitality. But Ashley, the man she has wanted for so long, is going to marry his placid cousin, Melanie. Mammy warns Scarlett to behave herself at the party at Twelve Oaks. There is a new man there that day, the day the Civil War begins. Rhett Butler. Scarlett does not know he is in the room when she pleads with Ashley to choose her instead of Melanie. Written by Dale O'Connor <daleoc@interaccess.com>

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

The greatest romance of all time! See more »

Genres:

Drama | History | Romance | War

Certificate:

Passed | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

The first film to credit a Production Designer, mainly to highlight the major contribution from William Cameron Menzies, who was not only the art director but also directed some of the second units. See more »

Goofs

In the credits, the actress who plays Scarlett O'Hara's mother is identified as "Barbara O'Neill." Her name was Barbara O'Neil. See more »

Quotes

[first lines]
Brent Tarleton: What do we care if we *were* expelled from college, Scarlett? The war is gonna start any day now, so we'd have left college anyhow.
Stuart Tarleton: War! Isn't it exciting, Scarlett? You know those fool Yankees actually *want* a war?
Brent Tarleton: We'll show 'em!
Scarlett: Fiddle-dee-dee! War, war, war; this war talk's spoiling all the fun at every party this spring. I get so bored I could scream. Besides... there isn't going to be any war.
Brent Tarleton: Not going to be any war?
Stuart Tarleton: Why, honey, of course there's gonna be a war.
Scarlett: If either of you ...
[...]
See more »

Crazy Credits

George Reeves is credited as playing the part of Brent Tarleton, and Fred Crane is billed as Stuart Tarleton. This is incorrect: Crane played Brent, and Reeves played Stuart. See more »

Alternate Versions

New Line Cinema spent $1 million to prepare a restored version using the original Technicolor printing process. This version was released theatrically June 1998. See more »

Connections

Referenced in X, Y and Zee (1972) See more »

Soundtracks

Sweet and Low
(1865) (uncredited)
Music by Joseph Barnby
In the score for the afternoon nap scenes
See more »

User Reviews

 
Like the film? Read the book.
20 November 2017 | by paskuniag-584-890551See all my reviews

I've seen the film many times, have always enjoyed it. But I've been reading the book for the first time. It's a very long novel, and you have to stay with it if you want to see the ending. It's a good read, but Margaret Mitchell, former newspaper reporter, is very thorough in her description of both Southern culture and the changes that the Civil War brought to it. It's the size of the book that was the biggest challenge for David O Selznick. Not what parts to film, but which parts to leave out. So many characters that appeared in the book couldn't be introduced in the movie without extending the film's length to well over four hours. So he had Sidney Howard write the screenplay, then cut that down to a filmable length by hiring several more writers to further pare the script, and was still rewriting it himself while it was being filmed. Selznick was close to running out of money, so he asked his angel, millionaire Jock Whitney, to loan him enough to finish the film. The film was finally completed and edited, then was test-marketed at a theatre not far from LA. The viewers were excited about having seen it and said so on their preview cards, which allowed Selznick to rest easy, knowing he had a hit on his hands.


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Frequently Asked Questions

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Details

Country:

USA

Language:

English

Release Date:

17 January 1940 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

Gone with the Wind See more »

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Box Office

Budget:

$3,977,000 (estimated)

Opening Weekend USA:

$1,192,593, 28 June 1998

Gross USA:

$200,852,579

Cumulative Worldwide Gross:

$402,352,579
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

| (1969 re-release) | (1985 re-release) | (1994 re-release) | (1989 re-release) | (copyright length)

Sound Mix:

Mono (Western Electric Sound System)

Color:

Color (Technicolor)

Aspect Ratio:

1.37 : 1
See full technical specs »

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