5.9/10
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5 user 3 critic

Painted Desert (1938)

Fawcett has obtained the deed to Banning's mine. Thinking the mine is worthless he sells it to Bob McVey. But when he learns the mine contains Tungsten, he sets out to get it back.

Director:

David Howard

Writers:

John Rathmell (screen play), Oliver Drake (screen play) | 1 more credit »
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Cast

Complete credited cast:
George O'Brien ... Bob McVey
Laraine Day ... Miss Carol Banning (as Laraine Johnson)
Ray Whitley ... Steve
Stanley Fields ... Bill
Maude Allen Maude Allen ... Yukon Kate
Fred Kohler ... Hugh Fawcett (as Fred Kohler Sr.)
Lloyd Ingraham ... Charles M. Banning
Harry Cording ... Henchman Burke
Max Wagner ... Henchman Kincaid
Lee Shumway ... Bart Currie
William V. Mong ... Banker Heist
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Storyline

Fawcett has obtained the deed to Banning's mine. Thinking the mine is worthless he sells it to Bob McVey. But when he learns the mine contains Tungsten, he sets out to get it back.

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

Desperate Men at Death Grips For Spoils that Mean Wealth to the Victors! See more »


Certificate:

Passed | See all certifications »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Includes a considerable amount of archive footage lifted out of, and not replaced back into, The Painted Desert (1931). See more »

Connections

Referenced in The Daffy Duckaroo (1942) See more »

Soundtracks

My Days Are Through on the Range
(1938) (uncredited)
Music and Lyrics by Ray Whitley
Written for the movie but not sung
See more »

User Reviews

 
Plenty of action and great scenery packed into an hour.
13 October 2014 | by max von meyerlingSee all my reviews

You know the stories of these programmer westerns, also called "juveniles" were trite. There's the "good guy", here George O'Brien, and there's the villain, always scheming to grab all the money, and who seems to be winning in the struggle right up until the very end. And there's "the Girl" who hates the hero until the very end when they decide to get married. But these pictures succeeded or failed with their audiences by their ability to deliver ACTION. The Painted Desert has plenty of action packed into less than a hour. First of all there is the beautiful scenery of just riding across the undulating desert with its scrub vegetation of Red Rock Canyon. Then there's a stamped and a perilous run of ore loaded wagons along a vertiginous cliff and lastly a great mine explosion. I note that IMDb informs us that much footage was lifted from an earlier, 1931, version. Even excepting that the cinematography from Harry Wild, later a master of noir cinema, is remarkable. There is a scene inside the mine that's drop dead gorgeous. I don't want to make a big deal about what is just an hour's entertainment, but its pleasant to report on a film which maintains a dignity and integrity when far more prestigious productions have strayed into inarticulate spectacle.


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Details

Country:

USA

Language:

English

Release Date:

12 August 1938 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

Contrabando de guerra See more »

Company Credits

Production Co:

RKO Radio Pictures See more »
Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Mono (RCA Victor System)

Aspect Ratio:

1.37 : 1
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