6.5/10
797
20 user 6 critic

Storm in a Teacup (1937)

Approved | | Comedy, Romance | 25 February 1938 (USA)
A local politician in Scotland tries to break the reporter who wrote a negative story about him, and who is also in love with his daughter.

Writers:

Bruno Frank (play), James Bridie | 2 more credits »
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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Vivien Leigh ... Victoria Gow
Rex Harrison ... Frank Burdon
Cecil Parker ... Provost William Gow
Sara Allgood ... Honoria Hegarty
Ursula Jeans ... Lisbet Skirving
Gus McNaughton ... Horace Skirving
Edgar K. Bruce ... McKellar (as Edgar Bruce)
Robert Hale Robert Hale ... Lord Skerryvore
Quinton McPherson Quinton McPherson ... Baillie Callender (as Quinton Macpherson)
Arthur Wontner ... Fiscal
Eliot Makeham ... Sheriff
George Pughe George Pughe ... Menzies
Arthur Seaton Arthur Seaton ... Police Sergeant
Cecil Mannering Cecil Mannering ... Police Constable
Ivor Barnard ... Watkins
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Storyline

Frank Burdon (Sir Rex Harrison) is a new reporter on a small-town Scottish paper. He's told to interview local politician William Gow (Cecil Parker), then left in charge of the paper overnight. He sees Gow being high-handed to a woman who can't afford to license her dog, and decides to run that story instead of the expected puff piece. Both are decent men, but a little too proud to back down, and the battle escalates into a criminal case. But at the same time, Burdon and Gow's daughter Victoria (Vivien Leigh) are falling in love.

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Genres:

Comedy | Romance

Certificate:

Approved | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Young Scots guy with a Glaswegian accent, who is Sir Rex Harrison's caddy, is a young Scottish actor called Jack Short (he didn't get a credit). See more »

Goofs

When Frank uses the embossing machine, he seems to be producing gibberish: we see him selecting the first few letters as PMJG, and just after that he makes a double letter. But when we see the tape, it isn't gibberish and there's no double letter in it. See more »

Quotes

Frank Burdon: The people of these islands are the most long-suffering in the world - they'll put up anything: they'll pull in their belts if they think it's their duty, they'll even go to the ends of the earth to be blown to bits if necessary. But there's two things they won't put up with - bullying and cruelty.
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Crazy Credits

In keeping with the Scottish setting, the opening credits are shown on various Scottish plaids. See more »

Connections

Version of Storm in a Water Glass (1931) See more »

Soundtracks

Daddy Wouldn't Buy Me a Bow-Wow
(uncredited)
Written by Joseph Tabrar
See more »

User Reviews

 
An apparent piece of froth hides a satire of Hitler
11 December 2004 | by kinekromSee all my reviews

Why isn't this excellent comedy better known? More to the point, why is it so consistently misinterpreted? Most commentators view it as an amusing piece of froth about the provost of a small Scottish town (Cecil Parker) ordering that a dog be put down because its owner cannot pay for its licence. There's Vivien Leigh as the provost's daughter and Rex Harrison on top form as the journalist who makes the silly story national news. It's all very funny and delightfully played by all concerned. But underlying this story (adapted from a German play by James Bridie) is a subtle satire of dictatorship as was then current in Germany and Italy. Parker's role is very clearly based on Hitler, a times quite unsettlingly so, and it is in the bold but successfully intermingling of whimsy with dictatorial manners that the film gains its particular power. Cute it may seem to be, but Victor Saville was a wise and quite a subversive soul, and you'll find few other films from this period that so ably blend the dark with the light. Take a look at it again and see what I mean!


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Details

Country:

UK

Language:

English | French

Release Date:

25 February 1938 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

Storm in a Teacup See more »

Company Credits

Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Mono (Western Electric Sound System)

Aspect Ratio:

1.37 : 1
See full technical specs »

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