6.2/10
173
9 user 7 critic

Slave Ship (1937)

Passed | | Adventure, Drama | 16 August 1937 (Sweden)
Captain Lovett ordered his first mate Thompson to get rid of his slave-trading crew and get a more respectable bunch for standard shipping, but when he brings his new bride Nancy aboard he ... See full summary »

Director:

Tay Garnett

Writers:

Sam Hellman (screen play), Lamar Trotti (screen play) | 3 more credits »
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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Warner Baxter ... Jim Lovett
Wallace Beery ... Jack Thompson
Elizabeth Allan ... Nancy Marlowe
Mickey Rooney ... Swifty
George Sanders ... Lefty
Jane Darwell ... Mrs. Marlowe
Joseph Schildkraut ... Danelo
Miles Mander ... Corey
Arthur Hohl ... Grimes
Douglas Scott ... Boy
Minna Gombell ... Mabel
Billy Bevan ... Atkins
Francis Ford ... Scraps
J. Farrell MacDonald ... Proprietor
J.P. McGowan ... Helmsman
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Storyline

Captain Lovett ordered his first mate Thompson to get rid of his slave-trading crew and get a more respectable bunch for standard shipping, but when he brings his new bride Nancy aboard he finds the same old setup, including slave trade. Written by Ed Stephan <stephan@cc.wwu.edu>

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

MUTINY! and these captive lovers live a honeymoon of horror! (Print Ad-Norwalk Hour, ((Norwalk, Conn.)) 2 July 1937) See more »

Genres:

Adventure | Drama

Certificate:

Passed | See all certifications »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Wallace Beery was notoriously abusive to the juvenile performers he worked with. For one scene in this film he had to slap his 16-year-old co-star Mickey Rooney in the face. Beery didn't fake the action and, without warning, slapped Rooney so hard he was knocked to the floor, spoiling the take and causing outrage among the crew. Director Tay Garnett took Beery aside and told him that everyone on the set loved Rooney, and that it would be most unfortunate if some lighting equipment were to "accidentally" fall on Beery's head. Beery got the message and behaved himself for the rest of the shoot. Interestingly, Rooney was one of the very few actors to work with Beery who later expressed no resentment towards him. He said, "Not everyone loved him the way I did." See more »

Goofs

When asked what color his sweetheart's hair is, Captain Lovett says that it is golden. But her hair is dark. See more »

Connections

Referenced in Crashing Hollywood (1938) See more »

Soundtracks

Hades
(1937) (uncredited)
Music by Alfred Newman
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User Reviews

A real oddity
8 June 2003 | by rufasffSee all my reviews

William Faulkner must have envisioned "Slave Ship" as a dark commentary on the curse of slavery(the "cursed ship" element is abandoned early on) and the studio tried to turn it into a typical adventure yarn. The results are strangely tasteless, unsettling, and facinating.

This is a bad movie, but one I highly recommend. The movie seems to be saying "these people veiwed things in a different way, but the best of them rose above slavery." We feel almost as much distance to movie makers, as Wallace Berry is mostly viewed as a roughish but likeable scoundrel; though we learn early on he is a genocidal mass murderer.

Though only seen in short glimpses, the inhumanity of slavery is fairly well expressed. It's the fairly casual context of subject that is allmost chilling. But see it for yourself and decide.


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Details

Country:

USA

Language:

English

Release Date:

16 August 1937 (Sweden) See more »

Also Known As:

The Last Slaver See more »

Company Credits

Production Co:

Twentieth Century Fox See more »
Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Mono (RCA High Fidelity Recording)

Aspect Ratio:

1.37 : 1
See full technical specs »

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