7.5/10
6,475
60 user 24 critic

Shall We Dance (1937)

Approved | | Comedy, Musical, Romance | 7 May 1937 (USA)
Clip
2:59 | Clip
A ballet dancer and a showgirl fake a marriage for publicity purposes, then fall in love.

Director:

Mark Sandrich

Writers:

Allan Scott (screen play), Ernest Pagano (screen play) | 3 more credits »
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Nominated for 1 Oscar. Another 3 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Complete credited cast:
Fred Astaire ... Peter P. Peters aka Petrov
Ginger Rogers ... Linda Keene
Edward Everett Horton ... Jeffrey Baird
Eric Blore ... Cecil Flintridge
Jerome Cowan ... Arthur Miller
Ketti Gallian ... Lady Tarrington
William Brisbane ... Jim Montgomery
Ann Shoemaker ... Shipboard Gossip Matron
Harriet Hoctor ... Harriet Hoctor - Dancer
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Storyline

Ballet star Pete "Petrov" Peters arranges to cross the Atlantic aboard the same ship as the dancer he's fallen for but barely knows, musical star Linda Keene. By the time the ocean liner reaches New York, a little white lie has churned through the rumor mill and turned into a hot gossip item: that the two celebrities are secretly married. Written by Diana Hamilton <hamilton@gl.umbc.edu>

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

Cut loose! Relax! Unbend! and clear your throat for cheering! See more »


Certificate:

Approved | See all certifications »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

The song, "Hi-Ho," was written for this movie as an opening number, but was dropped because of the expense of filming it. It was published in 1967. The song "Wake Up Brother and Dance" was also written for the movie and published in 1937 with the other songs, but it was dropped to make room for the title song. It appeared in the movie Kiss Me, Stupid (1964) with the title "Sophia." See more »

Goofs

At one part, Petrov is standing in front of a full-length mirror talking to Jeffrey. The reflection in the mirror doesn't match the actor's (or stand-in) playing Petrov's movements. See more »

Quotes

Linda Keene: What are the grounds for divorce in this state?
Clerk: Marriage.
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Crazy Credits

When George Gershwin's name appears in the credits, a bit of "Rhapsody in Blue" plays on the soundtrack. See more »

Connections

Referenced in Gilmore Girls: Love and War and Snow (2000) See more »

Soundtracks

Let's Call The Whole Thing Off
(1937) (uncredited)
Words by Ira Gershwin
Music by George Gershwin
Played during the opening credits and often in the score
Sung and danced by Fred Astaire and Ginger Rogers on roller skates
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User Reviews

 
"Still I Always Always Keep The Memory Of"
20 December 2007 | by bkoganbingSee all my reviews

With a fluff plot that's sillier than usual, Shall We Dance marks the one and only time the brothers Gershwin wrote a score for an Astaire/ Rogers musical. Fred was certainly no stranger to George and Ira, they had written Funny Face on Broadway for him and also had done Damsel in Distress which he co-starred with Joan Fontaine the year before.

This also is the last complete score the Gershwins did for the screen. While writing the score for the Goldwyn Follies, George would suddenly die of a brain tumor. It's a beautiful selection of songs, topped off by They Can't Take That Away From Me, a song forever after identified with Fred Astaire. It's also one of my favorite Gershwin songs, in fact one of my favorites period.

Fred's a hoofer at heart, but he's pretending to be a Russian ballet star named Petrov, appropriate for a guy named Peter Peters in real life. The girl he's infatuated with, musical comedy star Ginger Rogers is sailing to America on the same ship.

Through an incredible combination of circumstances rumor gets around that the two of them are in fact married. All the doing of her producer Jerome Cowan and Fred's manager Edward Everett Horton. They actually have to get married to keep the ruse going. Of course I needn't say what happens after that.

Two other Gershwin standards, They All Laughed and Nice Work If You Can Get It are sung and danced by the pair, the latter on roller skates. I also liked Fred's solo number with the engine room men on the ocean liner, Slap That Bass. The brothers Gershwin obviously saw the success Astaire had with Bojangles of Harlem in Swing Time and decided to imitate shall we say.

Look for a nice performance also by Eric Blore who plays the frustrated hotel manager who is getting positively flustered about how to handle the married/unmarried pair of Astaire and Rogers in his hotel.

There is a touch of sadness to this musical realizing that an incredible talent in George Gershwin would be stilled very shortly. I do love that man's music so.

You'll keep the memory of this film long after seeing it even once.


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Details

Country:

USA

Language:

English | French

Release Date:

7 May 1937 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

Stepping Toes See more »

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Box Office

Budget:

$991,000 (estimated)

Cumulative Worldwide Gross:

$6,662
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

Production Co:

RKO Radio Pictures See more »
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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Mono (RCA Victor System)

Aspect Ratio:

1.37 : 1
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