7.5/10
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42 user 8 critic

Oh, Mr. Porter! (1937)

With the help of a relative, a hopeless railway employee is made stationmaster of Buggleskelly. Determined to make his mark, he devises a number of schemes to put Buggleskelly on the railway map, but instead falls foul of a gang of gun runners.

Director:

Marcel Varnel

Writers:

Frank Launder (original story), J.O.C. Orton (screenplay) | 2 more credits »
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Cast

Complete credited cast:
Will Hay ... William Porter
Moore Marriott ... Jeremiah Harbottle
Graham Moffatt Graham Moffatt ... Albert
Sebastian Smith Sebastian Smith ... Mr. Trimbletow
Agnes Lauchlan Agnes Lauchlan ... Mrs. Trimbletow
Percy Walsh Percy Walsh ... Superintendent
Dennis Wyndham Dennis Wyndham ... Grogan
Dave O'Toole Dave O'Toole ... The Postman
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Storyline

Through the influence of a relative, a hopeless railway employee is made stationmaster the sleepy Irish station of Buggleskelly. Determined to make his mark, he devises a number of schemes to put Buggleskelly on the railway map, but instead falls foul of a gang of gun runners. Written by D.Giddings <darren.giddings@newcastle.ac.uk>

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Genres:

Comedy

Certificate:

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Did You Know?

Trivia

The brief shot of a ferry taking Will Hay across to Ireland also appears as an English Channel ferry in Alfred Hitchcock's The Lady Vanishes (1938). See more »

Goofs

When Harbottle moves the engine off its whistle is heard, but neither he nor Porter pull the whistle cord. See more »

Quotes

William Porter: Well, I can't give you the exact number at the moment.
[pauses to think]
William Porter: But in rough figures, I would say quite a lot.
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Connections

Spoofed in Sir Norbert Smith, a Life (1989) See more »

Soundtracks

Oh, Mr. Porter
(uncredited)
Music by George LeBrunn
Lyrics by Thomas LeBrunn
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User Reviews

Classic British comedy
8 May 2000 | by Cajun-4See all my reviews

It's very difficult to describe the comedy of Will Hay . He was very popular in Britain in the thirties, on radio, the music hall and in film. He looked shabby, seedy and shifty and usually played not very pleasant characters who can only be described as failed con artists, but funny he was. This is probably his best movie and it holds up very well. The plot owns something to that British classic of the theater THE GHOST TRAIN.

Interesting trivia point. This and many of these very British comedies, including some of the George Formbies were directed by a Frenchman Marcel Varnel.


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Details

Country:

UK

Language:

English

Release Date:

3 January 1938 (UK) See more »

Also Known As:

Gangstertrain See more »

Company Credits

Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Mono (recorded on) (British Acoustic Film Full-Range Recording System at Islington London)

Aspect Ratio:

1.37 : 1
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