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Camille (1936) Poster

(1936)

Trivia

Greta Garbo's personal favorite of all her films.
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Many people found Greta Garbo's process as an actress inscrutable, though no one questioned it because the results spoke for themselves. Her habit was to work out a performance ahead of time in private as much as possible. Too many eyes on her in front of the camera made her uneasy. As George Cukor once explained, "[Garbo] said that when she was acting she had some sort of an ideal picture in her mind - something she was creating - and she never saw the rushes because she was always disappointed in what she saw. But she said while she was acting she could imagine certain things and if she saw people just off the set staring at her, she felt like an ass, like somebody with a lot of paint on her face making faces. It stopped her imagination."
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The only memento of Hollywood kept by Greta Garbo was a pair of Adrian-designed kid gloves from this film. White leather, they were beaded with an ivy leaf pattern that spelled out her initials "G.G." over and over.
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As was her nature, Greta Garbo didn't like having a lot of people around the set, and she kept those who were there at arm's length. However, she did make an effort to put Robert Taylor at ease, even if she wasn't exactly warm. It was all part of her method. George Cukor recalled, "Garbo didn't talk much to Robert Taylor. She was polite but distant. She had to tell herself that he was the ideal young man, and she knew if they became friendly she'd learn he was just another nice kid."
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Greta Garbo wore bedroom slippers under all her fancy dresses so she could be comfortable, as well as more naturalistic in her acting.
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The scene early on in which Marguerite kisses Armand all over his face was Greta Garbo's idea.
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Sometimes, George Cukor was able to use Greta Garbo's natural aloofness to the film's advantage, such as during the scene at the beginning of the film when Marguerite goes to the theatre. He explained, "I wanted to show that Marguerite was a public woman, that she went to the theatre to be seen. She had to walk through a crowded lobby of men...I wanted her to walk through to show herself, as if on parade for clients. At first Garbo walked through rather quickly, as if she didn't want to be seen. I might have said, 'Walk through a little more brazenly, a little more slowly,' but I didn't. I realized she was right. She could slip through, and you knew damn well the men would look at her anyway."
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Costume Designer Adrian adapted certain hats to ensure Greta Garbo's celebrated profile would be visible, regardless of the Paris fashion at that time.
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Lionel Barrymore's role of Monsieur Duval was originally intended for his brother John Barrymore.
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Even though Greta Garbo liked George Cukor, he did have one behaviour on the set that annoyed her. He had the habit of sitting behind the camera during a scene and mouthing the words along with the actors, sometimes making hand and facial gestures as well. Garbo didn't waste any time telling him that she found it extremely distracting and asked him to stop. Nevertheless, she and Cukor worked remarkably well together, and over the course of filming they developed a deep respect for each other.
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When Irving Thalberg saw the rushes, he said, "I think we have caught [Greta Garbo] as she should be caught. She will be the most memorable Camille of our time."
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The play originally opened in Paris on 2 February 1852. Alexandre Dumas fils based the character Marguerite on a woman with whom he had an affair for 11 months. She died when she was 23. The movie inspired Milton Benjamin to write and publish a song in 1936 called "I'll Love Like Robert Taylor, Be My Greta Garbo".
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Film debut of Joan Leslie.
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Future two-time Oscar-winning director Fred Zinnemann was an uncredited assistant to George Cukor, helping him on camera angles and visual concepts. Zinnemann explained, "In 1936, long after I had worked with Busby Berkeley and Gregg Toland, I was again out of a job, and through the good offices of a friend, I was introduced to Cukor, who very kindly asked me to help him with camera angles and visual concepts in the making of a film starring Greta Garbo and Robert Taylor entitled 'Camille'. Actually my function on the film was rather limited. While it was a most interesting and valuable experience for me, I do not see how it could have been of much value to George. Since then we have occasionally met socially on very friendly terms, and, needless to say, I have enormous respect for George and for his work; but our professional association was not renewed, as I was signed by MGM to direct short subjects after 'Camille' in 1937."
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Henry Daniell replaced John Barrymore due to the influence of Greta Garbo. According to Daniell's daughter Allyson, by this point the increasingly alcoholic Barrymore had poor personal hygiene, and the actress preferred Daniell as de Varville. According to Allyson in a January 1983 issue of "Films in Review," "She enjoyed working with John in Grand Hotel (1932) but when it came time for 'Camille', it was observed that, unlike Barrymore, Daddy didn't smell."
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This film is featured in Annie (1982).
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The film had its world premier at the Plaza Theater on Palm Canyon Drive in Palm Springs, California on 12 December 1936, which also was the grand opening night of the theater. Robert Taylor was in attendance at the gala.
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This film was a box office success for MGM earning a profit of $388,000 ($6.7M in 2016) according to studio records.
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Included among the American Film Institute's 1998 list of the 400 movies nominated for the Top 100 Greatest American Movies.
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Included among the "1001 Movies You Must See Before You Die", edited by Steven Schneider.
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This film received its initial television broadcasts in Cincinnati Saturday 16 March 1957 on WXIX (Channel 19) (Newport KY), in both New York City and Seattle Sunday 7 April 1957 on WCBS (Channel 2) and on KING (Channel 5) , and in Philadelphia Tuesday 9 April 1957 on WFIL (Channel 6); it was first telecast in Portland OR 7 May 1957 on KGW (Channel 8), in Minneapolis 22 May 1957 on KMGM (Channel 9), in Los Angeles 24 May 1957 on KTTV (Channel 11), in New Haven CT 4 June 1957 on WNHC (Channel 8), in Altoona PA 11 June 1957 on WFBG (Channel 10), in Honolulu 4 July 1957 on KHVH (Channel 13), in Phoenix 18 July 1957 on KPHO (Channel 5), and in Chicago 14 September 1957 on WBBM (Channel 2); it first aired in San Francisco 11 October 1958 on KGO (Channel 7).
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"Camille" is featured in the film Words and Music (1948) where the movie poster is shown as well as Richard Rodgers (portrayed by Tom Drake) going to see the film at a theater.
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