6.5/10
124
5 user 1 critic

The Village Smithy (1936)

The narrator sets the scene for a warped version of the classic poem, and the hijinks when assistant Porky gives the blacksmith a rubber horseshoe, then a hot horseshoe on the horse's backside by accident.

Director:

Tex Avery (as Fred Avery)
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Cast

Uncredited cast:
Tex Avery ... Blacksmith (voice) (uncredited)
Joe Dougherty Joe Dougherty ... Porky Pig (voice) (uncredited)
Earle Hodgins ... Narrator (voice) (uncredited)
Joe Twerp Joe Twerp ... Ditch Digger (voice) (uncredited)
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Storyline

The narrator sets the scene for a warped version of the classic poem, and the hijinks when assistant Porky gives the blacksmith a rubber horseshoe, then a hot horseshoe on the horse's backside by accident.

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Details

Country:

USA

Language:

English

Release Date:

5 December 1936 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

El herrero del pueblo See more »

Company Credits

Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Mono

Aspect Ratio:

1.37 : 1
See full technical specs »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

The title is from a line in a traditional poem (1841) by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, The Village Blacksmith. "Under a spreading chestnut-tree, The village smithy stands; The smith, a mighty man is he, With large and sinewy hands." See more »

Alternate Versions

This cartoon was colorized in 1968 by having every other frame traced over onto a cel. Each redrawn cel was painted in color and then photographed over a colored reproduction of each original background. Needless to say, the animation quality dropped considerably from the original version with this method. The cartoon was colorized again in 1995, this time with a computer adding color to a new print of the original black and white cartoon. This preserved the quality of the original animation. See more »

Connections

Version of The Village Blacksmith (1897) See more »

Soundtracks

In the Shade of the Old Apple Tree
(uncredited)
Music by Egbert Van Alstyne
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Frequently Asked Questions

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User Reviews

 
Henry Wadsworth Longfellow's 'The Village Blacksmith' gets wildly entertaining treatment
20 November 2017 | by TheLittleSongbirdSee all my reviews

Love animation, it was a big part of my life as a child, particularly Disney, Looney Tunes and Tom and Jerry, and still love it whether it's film, television or cartoons.

Also have much admiration for Tex Avery, an animation genius whose best cartoons are animated masterpieces and some of the best cartoons ever made from anybody. 'The Village Smithy', adapted from the classic poem 'The Village Blacksmith' in a wildly entertaining and deliciously warped way, like 'Milk and Money' and 'Porky the Wrestler' is up there as among Avery's best Porky Pig cartoons. To me, 'The Village Smithy' is also one of Porky's better early efforts and Avery's better early ones in general. Sometimes during this period there was the sense that he had not yet found his feet, his style can be found all over here.

'The Village Smithy' is also a cartoon where the relative slightness of the story can be completely overlooked because of the hilarity and brilliant timing of the gags (of which there are a lot and they come thick and fast), immaculate pacing and Avery's wild wackiness being apparent throughout and used to full advantage. The treatment of blacksmithing is done to truly imaginative effect.

Animation is characteristically great, crisp, detailed and fluid, the black and white holds up well. Carl Stalling once again provides an outstanding score, it is lush, energetic and characterful, with clever orchestration and a mastery of not just adding to the action but enhancing it as well (Stalling was a near-unequalled master at this).

It can be expected that Porky is a likable character and he is, though to me he works better in support against a stronger in personality character, while he plays it straight, than a lead.

The only issue for me again is Joe Dougherty's voice work as Porky, it's not just because Mel Blanc's more famous interpretation is more appealing to me but Dougherty doesn't sound anywhere near as natural or endearing, have always found that he overdid the stutter and that's true here too.

Concluding, great. 9/10 Bethany Cox


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