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These Three (1936)

Passed | | Drama, Romance | 18 March 1936 (USA)
Two school teachers and the man they both love face ruin when a malicious student cooks up a lie.

Director:

William Wyler

Writer:

Lillian Hellman (original story and screen play)
Reviews
Nominated for 1 Oscar. Another 1 nomination. See more awards »

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Cast

Complete credited cast:
Miriam Hopkins ... Martha
Merle Oberon ... Karen
Joel McCrea ... Dr. Cardin
Catherine Doucet ... Mrs. Mortar (as Catharine Doucet)
Alma Kruger ... Mrs. Tilford
Bonita Granville ... Mary Tilford
Marcia Mae Jones ... Rosalie
Carmencita Johnson ... Evelyn
Mary Anne Durkin Mary Anne Durkin ... Joyce (as Mary Ann Durkin)
Margaret Hamilton ... Agatha
Walter Brennan ... Taxi Driver
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Storyline

This first film version of "The Children's Hour" uses a heterosexual triangle rather than the play's lesbian theme. The plot concerns schoolteachers Karen Wright and Martha Dobie, both of whom are in love with Dr. Joe Cardin. The malicious lie of one of their students involves all three in a scandal which disrupts all their lives. Written by Daniel Bubbeo <dbubbeo@cmp.com>

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

Tortured by a Suppressed Love! See more »

Genres:

Drama | Romance

Certificate:

Passed | See all certifications »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Despite the changes made for the film because of censorship, nearly all of the dialogue is identical to that in the 1934 play "The Children's Hour", on which this film was based. See more »

Goofs

Before Mrs. Tilford's maid slaps Mary (Bonita Granville) in one of the final scenes of the film, she grabs the girl and says, "Bonita, come here." See more »

Quotes

Martha Dobie: I was so alone and so sorry I couldn't have what other kids had that - well, I think that's really the reason why I decided to teach. Being young is awfully hard and I wanted to make it easier for other kids when I grew up.
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Connections

Referenced in Timeless: Hollywoodland (2018) See more »

User Reviews

I cannot tell a lie--brilliant!!
11 January 2003 | by DoylenfSee all my reviews

This version of Lillian Hellman's play "The Children's Hour" is by far more satisfying than the Audrey Hepburn-Shirley MacLaine remake in the 1960s which retained the lesbianism theme while revolving around a child's lie.

Instead, this earlier William Wyler version changes the slanderous lie to a heterosexual one--and none of the power is lost in the telling of a tale about a manipulative young girl's lie that destroys the lives of three innocent people.

The acting is all on an extraordinarily high level here--everyone, from Merle Oberon to Miriam Hopkins to Joel McCrea and especially little Bonita Granville (as a liar who even stoops to blackmail to keep her lie afloat). As the terrorized girl, Marcia Mae Jones is every bit as adept as the others in making the entire story a convincing one.

The power of a lie to destroy others has never been more effectively played out than it is here. Under William Wyler's direction, the screenplay has been expanded with enough outdoor scenes to keep the film from seeming like a filmed stage play.

Joel McCrea has never been more effective in a sympathetic role. He and Merle Oberon are impressive and wholly believable as the young lovers. Miriam Hopkins has a difficult role and she handles it brilliantly. Bonita Granville fully deserved her Oscar nomination as the monstrous girl, sparing nothing to make her one of the most hateful brats in screen history.

Well worth watching for some brilliant performances and a compelling story.


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Details

Country:

USA

Language:

English | German | French | Latin

Release Date:

18 March 1936 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

The Children's Hour See more »

Company Credits

Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Mono (Western Electric Wide Range Noiseless Recording)

Aspect Ratio:

1.37 : 1
See full technical specs »

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