Sabotage (1936) - News Poster

(1936)

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Crime Experts On Bellum Entertainment Shows Halt Work Until Back Wages Are Paid

Former FBI special agent Tim Clemente and his associates at Xg Productions have worked on more than 100 true-crime shows for Bellum Entertainment, serving as on-air experts on shows like It Takes a Killer, I Married a Murderer and Corrupt Crimes. But Clemente says he and his colleagues – all former law enforcement officials – are through working for Bellum until they get paid the $50,000 they're owed in back wages. "We're no longer going to provide services to them until…
See full article at Deadline TV »

The Lodger (1927)

Hitchcock’s first self-professed ‘Hitch’ picture is still a winner. Many of his recurring themes are present, and some of his visual fluidity – in this finely tuned commercial ‘shock’ movie with witty visual tricks from Hitchcock’s own background as an art director. And hey, he secured a real box office name to star as the mysterious maybe-slayer, ‘The Avenger.’

The Lodger: A Story of the London Fog

Blu-ray

The Criterion Collection 885

1927 / B&W + Color tints / 1:33 Silent Ap / 91 min. / available through The Criterion Collection / Street Date June 27, 2017 / 39.95

Starring: Ivor Novello, June Tripp, Marie Ault, Arthur Chesney, Malcolm Keen.

Cinematography: Gaetano di Ventimiglia

Film Editor + titles: Ivor Montagu

Assistant director: Alma Reville

Written by Eliot Stannard from the book by Marie Belloc Lowndes

Produced by Michael Balcon and Carlyle Blackwell

Directed by Alfred Hitchcock

Alfred Hitchcock became the most notable English film director for all the right reasons — he was talented and creative,
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Hitchcock/Truffaut – Review

I was 12 years old in 1968. One of my favorite places was the library, in those days the closest library to us was the Tesson Ferry Branch in South St. Louis County. My most prized possession was my library card.

My Mother used to drop me off there on a Saturday or a summer weekday and I would spend the whole day reading. One of those days I pulled a book off the shelf called Hitchcock/Truffaut and sat down to read it. I knew who Alfred Hitchcock was from his television show, and from his monthly Mystery Magazine as well as anthologies that I was reading avidly, Tales That Frightened Even Me, More Tales for the Nervous and, my favorite, Stories to be Read After Dark.

I was aware that Alfred Hitchcock was most renowned for directing movies. I had seen a few on television, Saboteur was a mainstay on Kplr TV,
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

Vertigo Screens at The Hi-Pointe Saturday Morning – Here are Alfred Hitchcock’s Ten Best Movies

Article by Jim Batts, Dana Jung, and Tom Stockman

Alfred Hitchcock’s Vertigo screens at St. Louis’ fabulous Hi-Pointe Theater this weekend as part of their Classic Film Series. It’s Saturday, March 11th at 10:30am at the Hi-Pointe located at 1005 McCausland Ave., St. Louis, Mo 63117. The film will be introduced by Harry Hamm, movie reviewer for Kmox. Admission is only $5

This gives us a perfect excuse to re-run this top ten list so here, according to We Are Movie Geeks, are Alfred Hitchcock’s ten best films:

Frenzy

Frenzy, Hitchcock’s next to last feature film from 1972, represented a homecoming of sorts since it was the first film completely shot in his native England since his silents and early ” talkies ” in the 1930’s. By dipping into the then somewhat new territory of serial killers, he took full advantage of the new cinema freedoms and truly earned his ‘ R ‘ MPAA rating.
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

The Secret Agent: ​a timely BBC adaptation of Joseph Conrad's novel

As Conrad’s 1907 novel screens, Mark Lawson hails a prescient masterpiece that has shaped depictions of terrorism and espionage

As they watch a suicide bomber with explosives strapped to his chest walk through a London that feels on the brink of political collapse, some viewers may suspect that the new TV adaptation of Joseph Conrad’s novel, The Secret Agent, has been tweaked to maximise contemporary relevance.

Those elements, though, are in the original, making the BBC1 three-parter – with Toby Jones as Verloc, an anarchist who becomes involved in a plot to blow up Greenwich Observatory – the latest example of Conrad’s story becoming a prism through which modern political insecurities are viewed. It is a tactic that goes back to 1936, when Alfred Hitchcock filmed the story, under the title Sabotage, as a reflection of the developing political pressures in Europe.

Continue reading...
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

Seven Anti-James Bond Movies You Haven’t Seen

The Bond franchise which has been with us so long, has become so deeply entrenched in popular culture, that we often forget what it was that first distinguished the Bonds a half-century ago. Skyfall might be one of the best of the Bonds, and even, arguably, one of the best big-budget big-action flicks to come along in quite a while, but it’s not alone. The annual box office is – and has been, for quite some time – dominated by big, action-packed blockbusters of one sort of another. The Bonds aren’t even the only action-driven spy flicks (Mr. James Bond, I’d like you to meet Mr. Jason Bourne and Mr. Ethan Hunt).

That’s not to take anything away from the superb entertainment Skyfall is, or the sentimentally treasured place the Bonds hold. It’s only to say that where there was once just the one, there are now many.
See full article at SoundOnSight »

Sabotage: a clip from Alfred Hitchcock's 1936 thriller

A clip from Alfred Hitchcock's dark thriller from 1936, adapted from Joseph Conrad's novel The Secret Agent. By coincidence, Hitchcock's previous film, released earlier in the same year, was called Secret Agent. Austrian actor Oscar Homolka plays Verloc, who is plotting a terrorist outrage in London, with Sylvia Sidney as his wife. In this scene, Verloc blames Scotland Yard for the death of his wife's hapless brother, blown up accidentally as he carries a bomb intended for Piccadilly Circus tube station

Sabotage is released on Blu-Ray on 1 June courtesy of Network Distributing Continue reading...
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

The Birds Screens at Schlafly Thursday – Here are Alfred Hitchcock’s Ten Best Movies

Article by Jim Batts, Dana Jung, and Tom Stockman

The Birds screens at Schlafly Bottleworks (7260 Southwest Ave.- at Manchester – Maplewood, Mo 63143) Thursday, April 2nd at 7pm. It is a benefit for Helping Kids Together (more details about this event can be found Here)

This gives us a perfect excuse to re-run this top ten list from March of 2012. Alfred Hitchcock directed 54 feature films between 1925 and 1976, and here, according to We Are Movie Geeks, are his ten best:

Frenzy

Frenzy, Hitchcock’s next to last feature film from 1972, represented a homecoming of sorts since it was the first film completely shot in his native England since his silents and early ” talkies ” in the 1930’s. By dipping into the then somewhat new territory of serial killers, he took full advantage of the new cinema freedoms and truly earned his ‘ R ‘ MPAA rating. Perhaps ole’ ” Hitch ” wanted to give those young up-and-coming
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

Video of the Day: See Every Alfred Hitchcock Cameo

Any Hitchcock fan has no doubt looked carefully while watching one of his movies in order to spot his infamous cameos. Hitchcock’s earlier cameos are especially hard to catch, and so Youtube user Morgan T. Rhys put together this video compiling every cameo Alfred Hitchcock ever made.

Hitchcock made a total of 39 self-referential cameos in his films over a 50 year period. Four of his films featured two cameo appearances (The Lodger: A Story of the London Fog UK), Suspicion, Rope, and Under Capricorn). Two recurring themes featured Hitchcock carrying a musical instrument, and using public transportation.

The films are as follows:

The Lodger (1927), Easy Virtue (1928), Blackmail (1929),Murder! (1930), The Man Who Knew Too Much (1934), The 39 Steps (1935),Sabotage (1936), Young and Innocent (1937), The Lady Vanishes (1938), Rebecca(1940), Foreign Correspondent (1940), Mr. & Mrs. Smith (1941), Suspicion (1941),Saboteur (1942), Shadow of a Doubt (1943), Lifeboat (1944), Spellbound (1945),Notorious (1946), The Paradine Case (1947), Rope (1948), Under Capricorn (1949),Stage Fright (1950), Strangers on a Train
See full article at SoundOnSight »

Movie Poster of the Week: Lesser-Known Oscar Nominees of the 60s and 70s

  • MUBI
The poster for Voyage of the Damned makes a bold claim, and maybe those who saw Stuart Rosenberg’s star-studded blockbuster in 1976 have remembered it ever since. Until a couple of weeks ago, however, when I saw it in a list of past Oscar nominees, I had never heard of it, and I don’t think it would be unfair to say that it is a film that has not stood the test of time.

Voyage of the Damned, which chronicles the tragic failed escape of 937 Jewish refugees from Nazi Germany, was nominated for three Oscars (for Best Score, Best Adapted Screenplay, and for Lee Grant for Best Supporting Actress, the lone acting nominee among a boatload of international heavyweights).

Oscar nominations, especially for acting, tend to confer a certain amount of immortality on their recipients (you are forever “Academy Award nominee Lee Grant”) and there are many films and
See full article at MUBI »

Silent movies

Think silent films reached a high point with The Artist? The pre-sound era produced some of the most beautiful, arresting films ever made. From City Lights to Metropolis, Guardian and Observer critics pick the 10 best

• Top 10 teen movies

• Top 10 superhero movies

• Top 10 westerns

• Top 10 documentaries

• Top 10 movie adaptations

• Top 10 animated movies

• More Guardian and Observer critics' top 10s

10. City Lights

City Lights was arguably the biggest risk of Charlie Chaplin's career: The Jazz Singer, released at the end of 1927, had seen sound take cinema by storm, but Chaplin resisted the change-up, preferring to continue in the silent tradition. In retrospect, this isn't so much the precious behaviour of a purist but the smart reaction of an experienced comedian; Chaplin's films rarely used intertitles anyway, and though it is technically "silent", City Lights is very mindful of it own self-composed score and keenly judged sound effects.

At its heart,
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

New London film event set for Battersea Power Station

  • ScreenDaily
Exclusive: Organisers in talks with studios and indie distributors for October film event.

London’s Battersea Power Station is to stage a new four-day film festival this October.

The four-day event, called Zookastar, will run from October 31 to November 3 at the iconic former power station on the Thames.

According to organisers, the event will host around 20-25 English-language, “mainstream” completed features - including previews of upcoming blockbusters, premieres, a red-carpet, sneak preview footage, first-look trailers, appearances by filmmakers and cast, masterclasses, Q&A sessions, memorabilia and autograph signings.

The power station will house four screens, including a 500-seat 3D-enabled cinema. Organisers are currently in discussion with studios and independent distributors over content. They are also in talks with sponsors.

The half-term timed event will be based around seven zones: action and adventure, classic horror, movie production, costumes and props, the toys and robots zone, Bollywood and comics and pop culture.

UK animation
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Guest Blog: Celebrate Alfred Hitchcock Day with Stephen Rebello on 6 Great Reasons Why Hitchcock Is Still the Master of Suspense

Everyone celebrates President's Day, Valentine's Day, and the sort, but it's the cool kids who know that tomorrow, March 12th, is National Alfred Hitchcock Day!

Need a reminder why Alfred Hitchcock is still the legendary master of suspense? Read on!

Hitchcock, the recent film starring Sir Anthony Hopkins, was based on Stephen Rebello’s bestselling book, Alfred Hitchcock and the Making of Psycho. We asked Stephen to write something special for Hitchcock Day, and he came up with “6 Great Reasons Why Hitchcock Is Still the Master of Suspense.”

6 Great Reasons Why Hitchcock Is Still the Master of Suspense

Psycho. Vertigo. North by Northwest. The Birds. If Alfred Hitchcock had directed nothing more than that astonishing quartet, he’d still be considered the maestro of creating nail-biting suspense, romantic intrigue, and unforgettable thrills. But that incredible run of movies, released in theaters from 1958 to 1963, represents only a drop in the bloody bucket of Hitchcock’s masterworks,
See full article at Dread Central »

Trailer, Two Clips for the Four Part Season Finale of Star Wars: The Clone Wars

The story of Ahsoka Tano takes an unexpected, shocking turn in the epic four-part conclusion to Star Wars: The Clone Wars Season Five. In the first of this four-part episode arc, Anakin and Ahsoka are called back from the frontlines to investigate a deadly explosion at the Jedi Temple. Clues surface that a Jedi might have been responsible for the blast in “Sabotage,” Saturday, February 9th at 9:30am Et/Pt on Cartoon Network.

Trivia:

· The four episodes of this arc are all named after Alfred Hitchcock films: Sabotage (1936), The Man Who Knew Too Much (1934), To Catch a Thief (1955) and The Wrong Man (1955).

· “I’m afraid one can become the other,” says Anakin, referring to past political idealists who have betrayed the Jedi, including Count Dooku and General Krell from Season Four. It’s ironic, given his future.

· Russo-isc’s speech pattern, name, and habit of flipping his visor to
See full article at ScifiMafia »

Anakin and Ahsoka investigate bombing at the Jedi Temple in Star Wars: The Clone Wars

.Sometimes even the smallest doubt can shake the greatest belief.. In the first of this four-part episode arc, Anakin and Ahsoka are called back from the frontlines to investigate a deadly explosion at the Jedi Temple. Clues surface that a Jedi might have been responsible for the blast in .Sabotage,. Saturday, February 9th at 9:30am Et/Pt on Cartoon Network. From Cn: Trivia: · The four episodes of this arc are all named after Alfred Hitchcock films: Sabotage (1936), The Man Who Knew Too Much (1934), To Catch a Thief (1955) and The Wrong Man (1955). · .I.m afraid one can become the other,. says Anakin, referring to past political idealists who have betrayed the Jedi, including Count
See full article at Monsters and Critics »

Seven Anti-007 Movies You Haven’t Seen

(*My apologies for this coming so long after Sound on Sight’s celebration of 50 years of James Bond, but I’ve been swamped with end-of-semester work and only just now managed to finish this. Hope you all still find this of interest.)

As a coda to the Sos’s James Bond salute, there’s still a point I think deserves to be made.

The Bond franchise which has been with us so long, has become so deeply entrenched in popular culture, that we often forget what it was that first distinguished the Bonds a half-century ago. Skyfall might be one of the best of the Bonds, and even, arguably, one of the best big-budget big-action flicks to come along in quite a while, but it’s not alone. The annual box office is – and has been, for quite some time – dominated by big, action-packed blockbusters of one sort of another.
See full article at SoundOnSight »

Toby Jones: dial H for Hitchcock

He's played Truman Capote and Karl Rove – now Toby Jones is donning a fat suit and prosthetic chin to play the Master in new TV drama The Girl. Steve Rose talks to him about Hitchcock's dark side, failure and funky clothes

Little seems to have changed at Simpson's in the Strand since the days when Alfred Hitchcock dined here: the wood panelling, the chandeliers, the white-robed chefs carving hunks of meat on silver trolleys. Hitchcock liked the place so much, he featured it in his 1936 film Sabotage – though back then its star Sylvia Sidney and her kid brother had to dine upstairs, since women weren't admitted to the main room. The clientele doesn't appear to have changed since those days, either. Toby Jones and I are both in our 40s, and still the youngest people in the room by several decades.

We're here because Hitchcock is back on the menu.
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Toby Jones: dial H for Hitchcock

He's played Truman Capote and Karl Rove – now Toby Jones is donning a fat suit and prosthetic chin to play the Master in new TV drama The Girl. Steve Rose talks to him about Hitchcock's dark side, failure and funky clothes

Little seems to have changed at Simpson's in the Strand since the days when Alfred Hitchcock dined here: the wood panelling, the chandeliers, the white-robed chefs carving hunks of meat on silver trolleys. Hitchcock liked the place so much, he featured it in his 1936 film Sabotage – though back then its star Sylvia Sidney and her kid brother had to dine upstairs, since women weren't admitted to the main room. The clientele doesn't appear to have changed since those days, either. Toby Jones and I are both in our 40s, and still the youngest people in the room by several decades.

We're here because Hitchcock is back on the menu.
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

Film Feature: The 10 Best Hitchcock Jaw-Droppers

Chicago – Sacha Gervasi’s “Hitchcock” (which we will review Wednesday) takes moviegoers back to the landmark year when the Master of Suspense reached the final peak of a career that spanned over five decades. Alfred Hitchcock’s artistry, ambition and showmanship where at an all time high when he made 1960’s “Psycho,” a game-changing shocker that galvanized audiences and went on to become his most immortal and influential picture. Yet it is far from the only Hitchcock masterwork that caused audiences’ jaws to drop to the floor. As film buffs become reacquainted with the Master through the recent slew of biopics and Blu-ray releases (including a glorious 15-disc Blu-ray set we will review tomorrow), Hollywood Chicago presents its own list of the all-time greatest Hitchcock jaw-droppers — ten timeless scenes that still manage to jolt, exhilarate and inspire generations of cinephiles around the world.

10. The Crash in “Foreign Correspondent” (1940)

Foreign Correspondent

In “Cast Away” and “Flight,
See full article at HollywoodChicago.com »

BFI Hitchcock Season – Young & Innocent (1937)

Young & Innocent

Directed by Alfred Hitchcock

Starring Derrick De Marney, Nova Pilbeam, George Curzon

It is a matter of uncertain serendipity that my first film of the BFI’s Hitchcock season happened to be Young & Innocent, reputedly Hitch’s favourite of his British pictures, now widely considered as the first cohesion of style and substance that displays many of his subsequent iconic motifs and iconography - the incorrectly accused protagonist, the urgent romance, a dash of macabre humor, and of course the intangible plot driver or manipulative McGuffin. If you can parse Hitchcock’s long and exalted career into three core sections – the early silents as the art form’s grammar and genre definitions took shape, the British talkies where Hitch was on the vanguard on a new phase of cinema’s technological transition and the Hollywood era which from 1940 until his death in 1980 marks one of the longest, most
See full article at SoundOnSight »
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