7.9/10
19,364
134 user 46 critic

Mr. Deeds Goes to Town (1936)

Not Rated | | Comedy, Drama, Romance | 12 April 1936 (USA)
Trailer
1:29 | Trailer
A simple small-town man inherits a massive fortune and is immediately hounded by those who wish to take advantage of him.

Director:

Frank Capra

Writers:

Robert Riskin (screen play), Clarence Budington Kelland (story)
Reviews
Won 1 Oscar. Another 4 wins & 7 nominations. See more awards »

Videos

Photos

Edit

Cast

Complete credited cast:
Gary Cooper ... Longfellow Deeds
Jean Arthur ... Babe Bennett
George Bancroft ... MacWade
Lionel Stander ... Cornelius Cobb
Douglass Dumbrille ... John Cedar
Raymond Walburn ... Walter
H.B. Warner ... Judge May
Ruth Donnelly ... Mabel Dawson
Walter Catlett ... Morrow
John Wray ... Farmer
Edit

Storyline

Longfellow Deeds lives in a small town, leading a small town kind of life - including playing the tuba in the town band. When a relative dies and leaves Deeds a fortune, Longfellow picks up his tuba and moves to the big city where he becomes an instant target for everyone from the greedy opera committee to the sensationist daily newspaper. Deeds outwits them all until Babe Bennett comes along. Babe is a hot-shot reporter who figures the best way to get close to Deeds is to pose as a damsel in distress. When small-town boy meets big-city girl anything can, and does, happen. Written by A.L.Beneteau <albl@inforamp.net>

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

Rocking America with laughter!

Genres:

Comedy | Drama | Romance

Certificate:

Not Rated | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
Edit

Did You Know?

Trivia

Columbia head Harry Cohn was set against Jean Arthur being cast as the female lead. Frank Capra was finally able to persuade him by insisting that Cohn listen to her voice, not study her face. See more »

Goofs

When Jean Arthur first goes to the witness stand in the trial scene, she is carrying a small black purse. When, by the order of the judge, she returns to her seat, she does not bring the purse back with her. While she does walk back to the seat without her purse, the bailiff carries it while walking her back to her seat and hands it to her editor friend who is with her. See more »

Quotes

John Cedar: You are in love with him, aren't you?
Babe Bennett: What's that got to do with it?
John Cedar: You are, aren't you?
Babe Bennett: Yes!
John Cedar: Your honor, her testimony is of no value. Why shouldn't she defend him? It's the typical American womanhood. The instinct to protect the weak.
See more »

Crazy Credits

Winthrop Oliver Warner (a studio musician) actually played the tuba for the film. See more »

Connections

Referenced in Hedda Hopper's Hollywood (1960) See more »

Soundtracks

For He's a Jolly Good Fellow
(uncredited)
Traditional
In the score during the opening credits and often throughout the film
See more »

User Reviews

 
Tuba player inherits fortune and becomes a Cinderella Man and gets pixiliated in Manhattan!
3 August 2004 | by jotix100See all my reviews

One of Frank Capra's strengths as a film director was the great team he assembled. Not only did he have a great technical group behind him, but his casts combined talent that went from the major stars to the bit players.

In this fable, Mr. Capra gives an answer to those of us that always pondered: what would one do if one inherited a lot of money, or if one won the lottery (fat chance!) It must be terrifying to suddenly have a lot of wealth, in this case 20 million during the worst days of the Great Depression. Sometimes it's better to stay poor rather than have to deal with strangers that have designs on one's newly found wealth!

Gary Cooper has never been as charming as the tuba playing, country bumpkin whose life is changed dramatically when he has to go to Manhattan to claim his inheritance. His Longfellow Deeds gets to see first hand how the high society, his uncle belonged to, deals with this unsophisticated greeting card writing poet.

Jean Arthur was a natural comedienne. She is wonderful in this movie as the reporter who tricks Deeds into speaking with her and in the process falls in love with the man, the object of the ridicule she writes about.

Leonard Standing, one of the best character actors of the era, is equally effective as Cobb, the man who knows a thing or two about those society folks. George Bancroft was also good as MacWade.

The film has a pace that never lets the viewer down. In comparison with what passes today as film comedy, this is a masterpiece. It shows the genius of Frank Capra in charge of this group of people that make us treasure films like this one even if it's pure nonsense, which after all, was what the director was looking for to make us laugh.


47 of 57 people found this review helpful.  Was this review helpful to you? | Report this
Review this title | See all 134 user reviews »

Frequently Asked Questions

This FAQ is empty. Add the first question.
Edit

Details

Country:

USA

Language:

English

Release Date:

12 April 1936 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

Mr. Deeds Goes to Town See more »

Edit

Box Office

Budget:

$800,000 (estimated)
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

Production Co:

Columbia Pictures See more »
Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Mono (Western Electric Noiseless Recording)

Aspect Ratio:

1.37 : 1
See full technical specs »

Contribute to This Page

We've Got Your Streaming Picks Covered

Looking for some great streaming picks? Check out some of the IMDb editors' favorites movies and shows to round out your Watchlist.

Visit our What to Watch page



Recently Viewed