A simple small-town man inherits a massive fortune and is immediately hounded by those who wish to take advantage of him.

Director:

Frank Capra

Writers:

Robert Riskin (screen play), Clarence Budington Kelland (story)
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Won 1 Oscar. Another 4 wins & 7 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Complete credited cast:
Gary Cooper ... Longfellow Deeds
Jean Arthur ... Babe Bennett
George Bancroft ... MacWade
Lionel Stander ... Cornelius Cobb
Douglass Dumbrille ... John Cedar
Raymond Walburn ... Walter
H.B. Warner ... Judge May
Ruth Donnelly ... Mabel Dawson
Walter Catlett ... Morrow
John Wray ... Farmer
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Storyline

Longfellow Deeds lives in a small town, leading a small town kind of life - including playing the tuba in the town band. When a relative dies and leaves Deeds a fortune, Longfellow picks up his tuba and moves to the big city where he becomes an instant target for everyone from the greedy opera committee to the sensationist daily newspaper. Deeds outwits them all until Babe Bennett comes along. Babe is a hot-shot reporter who figures the best way to get close to Deeds is to pose as a damsel in distress. When small-town boy meets big-city girl anything can, and does, happen. Written by A.L.Beneteau <albl@inforamp.net>

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

Rocking America with laughter! See more »

Genres:

Comedy | Drama | Romance

Certificate:

Not Rated | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Jean Arthur never saw the film until she and Frank Capra were guests at a 1972 film festival. See more »

Goofs

The position of Deeds' hands change during the board meeting, after the firetruck goes by. See more »

Quotes

John Cedar: I have good news for you, sir. Mr. Semple left a large fortune when he died. He left it all to you, Mr. Deeds. Deducting the taxes, it amounts to something in the neighborhood of $20,000,000.
Mrs. Meredith - Housekeeper: How about lunch? Are the gentlemen going to stay or not?
Longfellow Deeds: Of course they're going to stay. She's got some fresh orange layered cake, you know, with the thick stuff on the top. Sure, they don't want to go to the hotel.
[starts playing the tuba]
John Cedar: Perhaps you didn't hear what I said, Mr. Deeds. The whole Semple ...
[...]
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Crazy Credits

Winthrop Oliver Warner (a studio musician) actually played the tuba for the film. See more »

Connections

Referenced in Picket Fences: Mr. Dreeb Comes to Town (1992) See more »

Soundtracks

Old Folks at Home (Swanee River)
(1851) (uncredited)
Written by Stephen Foster
Played with drumsticks and sung by Jean Arthur
Also sung a cappella by Gary Cooper
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User Reviews

 
This really is is what being human is all about !
8 January 2006 | by nicholas.rhodesSee all my reviews

Unvrivalled in the history of cinema and having just watched it again for the umpteenth time, I thought a short review on IMDb was necessary. I have watched the film regularly for the last twenty years and never tire of its humour, its tenderness, its wit, its romance, its general actors' performance and the originality of its subject matter. Never have tears and laughs been so much intermingled in the same film..I was gushing tears in the scene where Deeds hands a poem which Babe reads in the fog on her doorstep ... a few minutes later Deeds goes running off home, tripping up over a dustbin in the process and I was howling with laughter ... likewise the long passage in the courtroom when Deeds finally decides to "speak up" has me in fits of laughter over its finesse and wit. The final scene, where Deeds comes back to the almost empty courtroom to "collect" Babe who had been sitting by herself there once again started off my waterworks as he picks her up and tenderly embraces her all over the place. Indeed that final "kiss" is one of the photos featured on France's 3rd TV channel's "Cinéma-Club" on most Sunday nights.

They are truly indeed a BEAUTIFUL couple in all senses of the world. I will not go through the story of the film again as this has been more than amply related by others but suffice it to say I have never seen any other film made with quite this calibre and actors' performance. Ineed this is the type of film that could only be made once ! Each character is extremely well developed and each actor/actress has exactly the physique of the character they play - an absolutely perfect match, one of those "one-off" films where everything combines to make for the spectator's perfect pleasure.

What a shame that in the twenty first century we cannot produce films of this calibre using story line, actors' performance and plot alone - to obtain thrills from present-day audiences, large quantities of excessive noise, flashing lights and especially computer-generated imagery are necessary .... all this at the expense of plot and of the humour and witty lines. But, with modern technology being a double-edged knife, we should nevertheless thank God for it's enabling us to henceforth be able to appreciate these "golden oldies" for years to come !


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Details

Country:

USA

Language:

English

Release Date:

12 April 1936 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

Mr. Deeds Goes to Town See more »

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Box Office

Budget:

$800,000 (estimated)
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Company Credits

Production Co:

Columbia Pictures See more »
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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Mono (Western Electric Noiseless Recording)

Aspect Ratio:

1.37 : 1
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