8.5/10
219,270
318 user 117 critic

Modern Times (1936)

The Tramp struggles to live in modern industrial society with the help of a young homeless woman.

Director:

Charles Chaplin (as Charlie Chaplin)

Writer:

Charles Chaplin (as Charlie Chaplin)
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Popularity
3,551 ( 158)
Top Rated Movies #39 | 4 wins & 1 nomination. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Charles Chaplin ... A Factory Worker (as Charlie Chaplin)
Paulette Goddard ... A Gamin
Henry Bergman Henry Bergman ... Cafe Proprietor
Tiny Sandford ... Big Bill (as Stanley Sandford)
Chester Conklin ... Mechanic
Hank Mann ... Burglar
Stanley Blystone ... Gamin's Father
Al Ernest Garcia ... President of the Electro Steel Corp. (as Allan Garcia)
Richard Alexander ... Prison Cellmate (as Dick Alexander)
Cecil Reynolds Cecil Reynolds ... Minister
Mira McKinney ... Minister's Wife (as Myra McKinney)
Murdock MacQuarrie ... J. Widdecombe Billows (as Murdoch McQuarrie)
Wilfred Lucas ... Juvenile Officer
Edward LeSaint ... Sheriff Couler (as Ed Le Sainte)
Fred Malatesta ... Cafe Head Waiter
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Storyline

Chaplin's last 'silent' film, filled with sound effects, was made when everyone else was making talkies. Charlie turns against modern society, the machine age, (The use of sound in films ?) and progress. Firstly we see him frantically trying to keep up with a production line, tightening bolts. He is selected for an experiment with an automatic feeding machine, but various mishaps leads his boss to believe he has gone mad, and Charlie is sent to a mental hospital - When he gets out, he is mistaken for a communist while waving a red flag, sent to jail, foils a jailbreak, and is let out again. We follow Charlie through many more escapades before the film is out. Written by Colin Tinto <cst@imdb.com>

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

HE STANDS ALONE AS THE GREATEST ENTERTAINER OF MODERN TIMES! (Print Ad-Greenfield Recorder-Gazette, ((Greenfield, Mass.)) 10 March 1936) See more »


Certificate:

G | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

A full dialogue script was written for the film, as Charles Chaplin had intended to make a complete talkie. According to a documentary on the DVD release, Chaplin went so far as to film a scene with full dialogue before deciding instead to make a partial talkie. See more »

Goofs

(at around 1h 3 mins) When the factory worker is trapped in the machine, the position of some of the wheels changes between shots. See more »

Quotes

[first lines]
President of the Electro Steel Corp.: Section 5, speed her up, 401.
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Alternate Versions

The film originally ended with Charles Chaplin's character suffering a nervous breakdown and being visited in hospital by the gamin, who has now become a nun. This ending was filmed, though apparently only still photographs from the scene exist today (they are included in the 2003 DVD release of the film). Chaplin dropped this ending and shot a different, more hopeful ending instead. See more »

Connections

Referenced in 24x36: A Movie About Movie Posters (2016) See more »

Soundtracks

Hallelujah, I'm a Bum
(uncredited)
Music from the traditional folk song "Revive Us Again"
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User Reviews

 
THE FEEDING MACHINE SCENE IS UNSURPASSED
26 February 2018 | by digdigbySee all my reviews

I saw this as a child and my laughter at the feeding machine scene was so WILD that I have never laughed so hard at anything again in my entire life. I literally slid out of my chair to the ground gasping for air. The whole film is absurd and brilliant, crisply realized by a comedy genius but for me that one moment transcends even greatness and touches the sublime where is poetry and God. Seeing the 'feeding machine' again as an adult there are tears mixed with laughter. To eat is to live, it is the personal realm and the invasion of the authoritarian state into the personal realm is so arrogant and pompous that it frightens me a lot to see how far it has gone as 'they' regulate our speech, our food, our sex lives according to the latest PC doctrines of 'nice'. Chaplin would not have recognized this new world of ours where the working class he represents here is ruled by progressive billionaires spouting inanities.


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Frequently Asked Questions

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Details

Official Sites:

Instagram | Official Site

Country:

USA

Language:

English

Release Date:

25 February 1936 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

The Masses See more »

Filming Locations:

Santa Clarita, California, USA See more »

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Box Office

Budget:

$1,500,000 (estimated)

Opening Weekend USA:

$35,809, 28 December 2003

Gross USA:

$163,577

Cumulative Worldwide Gross:

$457,688
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Mono (Western Electric Noiseless Recording Sound System)| Silent

Aspect Ratio:

1.37 : 1
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