When a socialite sues a big paper for libel, the editor responsible calls in the help of his ignored fiancée and a former employee to frame her and make the false story seem true.

Director:

Jack Conway

Writers:

Maurine Dallas Watkins (screen play) (as Maurine Watkins), Howard Emmett Rogers (screen play) | 2 more credits »
Reviews
Nominated for 1 Oscar. See more awards »

Videos

Photos

Edit

Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Jean Harlow ... Gladys Benton
William Powell ... Bill Chandler
Myrna Loy ... Connie Allenbury
Spencer Tracy ... Warren Haggerty
Walter Connolly ... Mr. James B. Allenbury
Charley Grapewin ... Mr. Bane
Cora Witherspoon ... Mrs. Burns-Norvell
E.E. Clive ... Fishing Instructor
Bunny Beatty ... Babs (as Lauri Beatty)
Otto Yamaoka ... Ching
Charles Trowbridge ... Graham
Spencer Charters ... Magistrate
George Chandler ... Bell Hop
William 'Billy' Benedict ... Johnny (as William Benedict)
Hal K. Dawson Hal K. Dawson ... Harvey Allen
Edit

Storyline

Warren Haggerty is the chief editor of the New York Evening Star. He keeps on delaying his marriage with Gladys because of problems his newspapers must face. When a 5 million dollar lawsuit is filed by Connie Allenbury for falsely printing she is a marriage-breaker, he plans a marriage in words only between Gladys and the Don Juan Bill Chandler. The goal is to catch Connie alone with a married man. Written by Yepok

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

FOUR BIG STARS TOGETHER IN ONE SUPREME THRILL PACKED REVEL! (Print Ad- Newark Sunday Call, ((Newark, NJ)) 27 December 1936) See more »

Genres:

Comedy | Romance

Certificate:

Passed | See all certifications »
Edit

Did You Know?

Trivia

Throughout the course of filming, Spencer Tracy had fun giving Myrna Loy a good-natured hard time. See more »

Goofs

Spencer Tracy refers to William Benedict's character as "Joe", although the opening credits identify him as "Johnny". See more »

Quotes

Bill Chandler: You know, you're one girl in a million.
Gladys: You don't know the tenth of it.
See more »

Connections

Referenced in Hollywood Hist-o-Rama: Jean Harlow (1962) See more »

Soundtracks

Wedding March
(1843) (uncredited)
from "A Midsummer Night's Dream"
Music by Felix Mendelssohn Bartholdy
Played during the opening credits and often in the score
Whistled by William Powell
See more »

User Reviews

Unsung, starry gem of a comedy
15 January 2004 | by Poseidon-3See all my reviews

A film with four stars of this magnitude was an event in 1936 and, indeed, it still is in 2004. Though the subject matter is slight and the acting is not too terribly taxing on the affable quartet, it was well-thought-of-enough to rate a Best Picture Oscar nomination. Tracy plays a newspaperman whose own wedding plans are interrupted by the fact that his paper has mistakingly run a libelous story about the daughter of one of his competitors. Loy, as the daughter, slaps a $5 million libel suit against Tracy's newspaper which, if won, will sink it. Since he knows he will lose, he rehires former employee Powell, who he feels will be able to charm Loy into an indelicate situation, thus rendering her reputation spoiled enough to cost her her libel suit. Part of the scheme, however, to make it seem legitimate is to marry off Powell to his own fiance (Harlow.) It is here that the film gets a lot of its laughs as desperate-to-wed Harlow finds herself getting married......but to the wrong man! Powell and Loy get most of the sparkling dialogue and sophisticated repartee, but contemporary audiences are likelier to get a kick out of mouthy, hilarious Harlow. Her comedic gifts (and her ample physical assets) are on prime display, notably when the judge says it's safe to kiss the bride and in a later scene where Powell is learning to fly-fish. All of the stars do very well and each gets a chance to rub up against the others. Powell and Loy are a legendary pairing with 14 films to show them off. Tracy does a slick job and shows his versatility. They are aided by a stable of amusing character actors, the type of people Hollywood was famous for and can no longer provide with regularity. (Today, almost any character actor that scores a hit is thrust into his/her own TV show, TV talk show or lead role in a film!) The film offers both wit and slapstick, wrapped up in some gorgeous sets and costumes. (The MGM gloss is fully in place.) Sadly, the light that was Harlow would be dimmed in just a year after this, but audiences are still able to enjoy her fine work in films like this.


32 of 35 people found this review helpful.  Was this review helpful to you? | Report this
Review this title | See all 70 user reviews »

Frequently Asked Questions

This FAQ is empty. Add the first question.
Edit

Details

Country:

USA

Language:

English

Release Date:

9 October 1936 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

Libeled Lady See more »

Company Credits

Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Mono (Western Electric Sound System)

Aspect Ratio:

1.37 : 1
See full technical specs »

Contribute to This Page



Recently Viewed