7.0/10
3,843
75 user 44 critic

The Devil-Doll (1936)

Passed | | Drama, Horror, Sci-Fi | 10 July 1936 (USA)
Trailer
1:54 | Trailer
An escaped convict uses miniaturized humans to wreak vengeance on those that framed him.

Director:

Tod Browning (uncredited)

Writers:

Garrett Fort (screen play), Guy Endore (screen play) | 3 more credits »
Reviews
Popularity
524 ( 2,092)
1 nomination. See more awards »

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Cast

Complete credited cast:
Lionel Barrymore ... Paul Lavond
Maureen O'Sullivan ... Lorraine Lavond
Frank Lawton ... Toto
Rafaela Ottiano ... Malita
Robert Greig ... Emil Coulvet
Lucy Beaumont ... Mme. Lavond
Henry B. Walthall ... Marcel
Grace Ford ... Lachna
Pedro de Cordoba ... Charles Matin
Arthur Hohl ... Victor Radin
Juanita Quigley ... Marguerite Coulvet
Claire Du Brey ... Mme. Coulvet (as Claire du Brey)
Rollo Lloyd ... Detective
E. Alyn Warren ... Commissioner (as E Allyn Warren)
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Storyline

Paul Lavond was a respected banker in Paris when he was framed for robbery and murder by crooked associates and sent to prison. Years later, he escapes with a friend, a scientist who was working on a method to reduce humans to a height of mere inches (all for the good of humanity, of course). Lavond however is consumed with hatred for the men who betrayed him, and takes the scientist's methods back to Paris to exact painful revenge. Written by Ken Yousten <kyousten@bev.net>

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

NOTHING LIKE IT SINCE THE DAYS OF LON CHANEY (Print Ad-Albany Evening News, ((Albany NY)) 16 July 1936) See more »

Genres:

Drama | Horror | Sci-Fi

Certificate:

Passed | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Madame Mandilip's special dolls are costumed as members of vicious street gangs known as the Apache (pronounced ah-PAHSH), who were involved in theft, prostitution, and the occasional murder in pre-World War I Paris. The dolls even perform the Apache dance popularized by the gangs, in which extremely close steps alternate with seemingly brutal punches, kicks, hair-pulling, spins, and throws; it was usually danced to the Valse des rayons (aka Valse chaloupée) composed by Jacques Offenbach. In the 1930s and 1940s, this dance was still performed by professional dancers and can be seen in several films and even cartoons of the period. See more »

Goofs

It defies reason that Lorraine wouldn't recognize her father after 17 years, especially as, to judge from the "old" photo, his appearance hadn't changed all that much. See more »

Quotes

Lavond (as Madame Mandelip): [a policeman has just left the shop, failing to recognize Lavond in disguise] Stupid policeman... To let an old white wig cost him 100 thousand francs.
Malita: It might have been safer to take him downstairs and make him "small."
Lavond (as Madame Mandelip): He's small already, in mind. In fact, Malita, if most men were reduced to the dimensions of their mentality, Marcel's plan wouldn't be necessary.
See more »

Alternate Versions

Also available in a computer-colorized version. See more »

Connections

Featured in TCM Guest Programmer: Danne DeVito (2007) See more »

Soundtracks

Valse des rayons
(uncredited)
from the ballet "Le Papillon"
Music by Jacques Offenbach
Played on a music box
See more »

User Reviews

 
Goofy but good Tod Browning horror flick
29 October 2001 | by zetesSee all my reviews

Lionel Barrymore is great in this film as an escaped convict out for revenge against the three bankers who framed him for embezzlement and murder seventeen years before. He and another fellow, a scientist, escape from Devil's Island together and arrive at the scientist's house, where his wife carries on his twisted experiments: shrinking living beings. His goal is to shrink all creatures on Earth, to make food production easier, but the shrunken things' brains don't function properly. You can control them telepathically, for some strange reason, but they can't think for themselves. When the scientist dies, Barrymore devises to use these dolls to get revenge on his enemies.

There are a lot of relatively good special effects in the film, and, like I said, Lionel Barrymore is fantastic. There is a nice emotional center of the film - Barrymore's daughter has suffered a lot from her father's crimes, and she hates him. Barrymore's sole purpose in getting revenge (and getting his enemies to confess their crimes) is to free his daughter from the shame in which she has always lived because of him. I actually wish that there was at least one more sequence concerning the daughter (there are three in the present film). The final scene is quite touching. 7/10.


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Details

Country:

USA

Language:

English

Release Date:

10 July 1936 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

The Witch of Timbuctoo See more »

Company Credits

Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

(Turner library print)

Sound Mix:

Mono (Western Electric Sound System)

Aspect Ratio:

1.37 : 1
See full technical specs »

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