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Come and Get It (1936) Poster

Trivia

Howard Hawks' own grandfather, C.W. Howard, was a paper baron in Neenah, Wisconsin, where Hawks spent some of his early childhood. Butte des Morts, the setting of the film, is described in the book as being a small town between Neenah and Menasha. Some believe that Hawks was removed from the film because Goldwyn felt he was "too close" to the subject matter.
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Walter Brennan won the very first Supporting Actor Academy Award for his role as "Swan Bostrom", the category having been introduced in 1937. In the span of four years (1937-41), Brennan won a then-unprecedented three Oscars for acting, subsequently for Kentucky (1938) and The Westerner (1940) - a feat unmatched until Katharine Hepburn won her third Best Actress award in 1969 for The Lion in Winter (1968). Brennan's success at the Academy Awards was seen as largely due in part to the fact that the Screen Extras Guild consistently voted for him, as Brennan had been an extra for many years until his breakout success as one of Hollywood's most respected character actors.
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Howard Hawks's take on his being "fired" is that he wasn't. Rather, he quit, after refusing to agree with Samuel Goldwyn, who wanted the narrative to stay closer to that of the book. Goldwyn had been ill and absent for the 42 days of shooting that Hawks directed and was unaware of Hawks' rewrites. Hawks left the production with only 14 days left to go.
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Howard Hawks stated that William Wyler's contribution was only ten minutes of screen time. However, it's generally thought that Wyler directed the last 30 minutes of the film.
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The world premiere was at the Liberty Theatre in Seattle, Washington, where Frances Farmer once worked as an usherette.
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Director Howard Hawks was replaced by William Wyler after Hawks was rude to producer Samuel Goldwyn.
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The Song, "Aura Lea," was popularized with new lyrics "Love Me Tender" by Elvis Presley, Ken Darby and Vera Matson in 1956. When Come and Get It (1936) was released, another song. "Aura Lee," by Hugo Frey, was published with a picture of Frances Farmer on its cover. However, the song she sings in the movie has music and lyrics from the older song.
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"Lux Radio Theater" broadcast a 60 minute radio adaptation of the movie on November 15, 1937 with Edward Arnold and Mary Nash reprising their film roles.
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Samuel Goldwyn paid $150,000 for the film rights to the novel by Edna Ferber.
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The game Evvie is playing when she tells her father about her break-up is called "diablo". It was very popular in the United States from around 1906 to 1915 - the time depicted at this point in the film.
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The first commercially successful mass-produced disposable paper cup was invented in 1907 by Lawrence Luellen, a Boston lawyer who was concerned with the spread of germs by people using shared glasses and dippers at public water stations. This led to the Dixie Cup Company.
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"The Screen Guild Theater" broadcast a 30 minute radio adaptation of the movie on March 15, 1942 with Walter Brennan and Edward Arnold reprising their film roles.
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Goofs | Crazy Credits | Quotes | Alternate Versions | Connections | Soundtracks

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