The story of how the novel "Mrs. Dalloway" affects three generations of women, all of whom, in one way or another, have had to deal with suicide in their lives.

Director:

Stephen Daldry

Writers:

Michael Cunningham (novel), David Hare (screenplay)
Reviews
Popularity
2,433 ( 450)
Won 1 Oscar. Another 42 wins & 126 nominations. See more awards »

Videos

Photos

Edit

Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Nicole Kidman ... Virginia Woolf
Julianne Moore ... Laura Brown
Meryl Streep ... Clarissa Vaughan
Stephen Dillane ... Leonard Woolf
Miranda Richardson ... Vanessa Bell
George Loftus George Loftus ... Quentin Bell
Charley Ramm Charley Ramm ... Julian Bell
Sophie Wyburd Sophie Wyburd ... Angelica Bell
Lyndsey Marshal ... Lottie Hope (as Lyndsay Marshal)
Linda Bassett ... Nelly Boxall
Christian Coulson ... Ralph Partridge
Michael Culkin ... Doctor
John C. Reilly ... Dan Brown
Jack Rovello ... Richie
Toni Collette ... Kitty
Edit

Storyline

In 1951, Laura Brown (Julianne Moore), a pregnant housewife, is planning a party for her husband, but she can't stop reading the novel "Mrs. Dalloway". Clarissa Vaughan (Meryl Streep), a modern woman living in present times is throwing a party for her friend Richard (Ed Harris), a famous author dying of A.I.D.S. These two stories are simultaneously linked to the work and life of Virginia Woolf (Nicole Kidman), who's writing the novel mentioned before. Written by Jonas Reinartz <jonas.reinarzt@web.de>

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

From the director of Billy Elliot See more »

Genres:

Drama | Romance

Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated PG-13 for mature thematic elements, some disturbing images and brief language | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
Edit

Did You Know?

Trivia

Miranda Richardson worked for only eight days. See more »

Goofs

In the Virginia Woolf segment, Leonard Woolf is shown setting type for their press, Hogarth Press. In fact, Leonard's hands shook so that he could not set type, and it was Virginia who did the typesetting. Virginia found setting type calming, and said that it shaped her feel for words on the page, influencing her approach to writing. See more »

Quotes

[first lines]
Virginia Woolf: [Narrating the letter] Dearest, I feel certain that I am going mad again. I feel I can't go through another one of these terrible times and I shant recover this time. I begin to hear voices and can't concentrate. So, I am doing what seems to be the best thing to do. You have given me the greatest possible happiness. You have been in every way all that anyone could be. I know that I am spoiling your life and without me you could work and you will, I know. You see I can't even write ...
See more »

Connections

Referenced in Face Off: Triple Threat (2012) See more »

Soundtracks

Satyagraha
by Philip Glass
See more »

User Reviews

Mrs Dalloway goes out to buy flowers
18 January 2003 | by lou-50See all my reviews

"The Hours" is about time - time we have left to make our lives enjoyable or to spend it in misery. It features the lives of three women, which might explain why half the film-goers (the males) might not want to see it and why it was left out of Ebert and Roeper's Top 10 films. If that perception is true, that would be a shame. "The Hours" is a wonderfully crafted film about universal themes of life and death, suppression and freedom, and unresolved love. That it is told from the viewpoint of three women should not diminish any of its appeal. Virginia Woolf must combat her life long mental affliction even as husband Leonard tries to manage her condition. Using the novel, 'Mrs Dalloway', the film conveys the heartache of isolation and forlorn lives in two other women who are directly connected to the book. In 1951, we meet Laura and Dan who, with their young son, would seem an ideal family. But Laura yearns for freedom, much as Mrs. Dalloway, and she must choose between giving up her family or dying. Move to 2001, and there is yet another Mrs. Dalloway in Claire and her dogged responsibility toward her former lover, Richard, now dying of AIDS. The themes of liberation, lesbianism, and dying enthrall all three women, and one does die in order that those around her might value even more the living. You cannot find three better actresses to portray these very complex individuals, in Julianne Moore, Meryl Streep, and Nicole Kidman, any or all should be nominated for Oscars. An equally fine supporting cast of Ed Harris, John Reilly, Stephen Dillane, Claire Danes, and Allison Janey make "The Hours" one of the most interesting and intelligent melodramas to come along in a while.


92 of 130 people found this review helpful.  Was this review helpful to you? | Report this
Review this title | See all 690 user reviews »

Frequently Asked Questions

See more »
Edit

Details

Country:

USA | UK | France | Canada | Germany

Language:

English

Release Date:

14 February 2003 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

The Hours See more »

Edit

Box Office

Budget:

$25,000,000 (estimated)

Opening Weekend USA:

$338,622, 29 December 2002

Gross USA:

$41,675,994

Cumulative Worldwide Gross:

$108,846,072
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

DTS | Dolby Digital

Color:

Color

Aspect Ratio:

1.85 : 1
See full technical specs »

Contribute to This Page



Recently Viewed