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Born to Dance (1936) Poster

(1936)

Trivia

Cole Porter picked James Stewart for the male lead and later said he sang "Easy to Love" as well as any professional singer. A dubbing track was prepared with baritone Jack Owens, but it was decided that Stewart's tenor voice was perfect for the song. In That's Entertainment! (1974), Stewart said, "The song had become a huge hit, even my singing wouldn't hurt it."
The cop in Central Park (played by Reginald Gardiner) spoofs conductor Leopold Stokowski and incorporates his long hair and dramatic gestures.
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The dress that Virginia Bruce throws on the floor and refuses to appear in is the same dress worn by Jeanette MacDonald in San Francisco (1936), a few months earlier.
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According to the biography "Beyond the Rainbow", this film was at one point to have included a role for Judy Garland.
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Geraldine Robertson played Chorine (uncredited). She landed the part as a result of being crowned Queen of the Centennial at the Texas State Fair in 1936, crowned by Ginger Rogers, and part of the prize for winning was a screen test with MGM.
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The submarine shown entering New York harbor at the beginning of the film is USS Pike (SS-173).
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During the "I Got You Under My Skin" musical number in this film audiences see for the first time on film The Sparton Model 566 1936 model of the "Bluebird Radio," (issued the year before), arguably the most important radio of the art deco era.
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Eleanor Powell singing voice was dubbed by Marjorie Lane.
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Allan Jones and George Murphy were considered for Ted Barker, but the role went to James Stewart.
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This film was first telecast in Seattle Monday 25 February 1957 on KING (Channel 5), followed by Norfolk VA 12 March 1957 on WTAR (Channel 3), by Portland OR 13 May 1957 on KGW (Channel 8), by Honolulu 13 June 1957 on KHVH (Channel 13), by Chicago 24 June 1957 on WBBM (Channel 2), by Indianapolis 4 November 1957 on WLW-I (Channel 13), by Minneapolis 8 December 1957 on KMGM (Channel 9), by Philadelphia 12 January 1958 on WFIL (Channel 6), by Los Angeles 24 February 1959 on KTTV (Channel 11), by San Francisco 3 July 1959 on KGO (Channel 7), and, finally, by New York City 1 March 1960 on WCBS (Channel 2).
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Originally planned as a vehicle for the British star Jessie Matthews, whose home studio Gaumont-British ultimately decided against sending her to Hollywood.
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Some cast members in studio records/casting call lists did not appear or were not identifiable in the movie. These were (with their character names): Charles Lane (Stage manager), Billy Watson (Newsboy) and Fuzzy Knight (Pianist).
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Features the song "I've Got You Under My Skin", later a signature song for Frank Sinatra.
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James Stewart had minor role in "Murder Man," a 1936 Virginia Bruce starring vehicle.
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The submarine shown entering New York harbor toward the beginning of the film is in fact, the U.S.S. Pike. But the P2 designation on the conning tower indicated that film was shot between December 1935 (when she was commissioned) and September 1938. The P2 is a class identifier and order number. In September of 1938 that would be replaced with Navy hull number 173. She took part in World War II. Including directing bombers to Wake Island where she was severely depth charged. She only sank one ship and damaged three others. At the time she was engaged the Navy was plagued with faulty torpedoes. By the middle of 1943, she was withdrawn and replaced by more advanced boats. She served out the rest of the war as a training boat. She was mothballed in1945. And sold for scrap in 1957.
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The submarine with the P4 on the conning tower in the U.S.S. Tarpon. She carried the designation P4 between September 1935 and March 1936. After which she was identified as SS-175. She conducted more than 10 war patrols and sank more than 30,000 tons of shipping. She reported many Japanese ships while on patrols. Some of her last patrols were life guard duty, to recovered downed pilots off Truk and other Japanese held islands. At the end of the war, she returned to New London, CT. She was towed to New Orleans where she served as a training boat until 1957. In August of 1957, she was being towed to a scrapping yard when she foundered off Cape Hatteras NC, on August 26, 1957.
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