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Werewolf of London (1935) Poster

Trivia

Considered to be the first mainstream werewolf movie. It preceded the more commercially successful The Wolf Man (1941) by six years.
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This film made up much of its werewolf mythology out of whole cloth. The ideas that being bitten by a werewolf makes one a werewolf, that a werewolf changes under the full moon, and that werewolves were wolf/man hybrids were completely made up. In folklore, one becomes a werewolf deliberately by practicing witchcraft and can change into a wolf at any time desired. However, this film's mythology, and that of others after it, heavily influenced pop culture views of werewolves to the point that these are now regarded as "official" mythology.
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The werewolf howl used in this film is a combination of Henry Hull's own voice and a recording of an actual timber-wolf. The result is generally thought to have a far more realistic result than in any subsequent werewolf films, including The Wolf Man (1941).
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While it has been well-documented that Henry Hull objected to Jack P. Pierce's original makeup design for the werewolf, producers were also concerned that Pierce's makeup effects would push the boundaries of censorship in the United States. Producers asked Pierce to tone down the zoomorphic qualities of the werewolf transformation scenes and asked him to make the werewolf appear more human in nature in order to gain approval of the censorship board. Pierce's first design for the creature would later be put to effect in The Wolf Man (1941).
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According to Greg Mank's book "Karloff and Lugosi", Henry Hull was being paid $2750 per week for his work, $250 more than Boris Karloff, who was then making $2500 per week for Bride of Frankenstein (1935). According to Mank, the studio also paid Hull's agent $82.50 per week and an additional fee of $1375 for what was termed Hull's trick shots. Warner Oland received a guaranteed $12,000 for his work on the film.
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The supposed "Tibetan" spoken in the movie is actually the Cantonese dialect of Chinese. The actor is otherwise just muttering gibberish.
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The opening scene in "Tibet" was filmed at Vasquez Rocks north of Los Angeles, well know to Star Trek: The Original Series (1966) fans as the rock outcropping from where Captain Kirk rolled a boulder down trying to kill the Gorn in Star Trek: The Original Series: Arena (1967).
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The copyright record synopsis has a scene where a boy is almost eaten by a plant in the botanical gardens sequence, and he is saved by Wilfred. It was not included in the final print.
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Bela Lugosi was considered for the role of Dr. Yogami, but he was busy making Mark of the Vampire (1935).
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The "original theatrical trailer" provided as a bonus feature on the DVD is actually the re-edited 1935 trailer with only Henry Hull and Valerie Hobson identified by name, and a Realart re-release title card prepared for the 1951 reissue. Scenes with Warner Oland are prominently featured, but his name never appears - a typical attempt to disguise the age of the film, since Oland had been dead for many years by the time it was re-released.
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Although they play husband and wife in this film, Henry Hull is 27 years older than Valerie Hobson.
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Shooting lasted from Jan. 18-Feb. 23, 1935, released June 3.
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J.M. Kerrigan, who played Glendon's assistant Hawkins, also appeared in Universal's next werewolf film The Wolfman, in which he portrayed Evelyn Ankers' father.
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Part of the original Shock Theater package of 52 Universal titles released to television in 1957, followed a year later with Son of Shock, which added 20 more features.
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Pre-release publicity material lists Reginald Barlow cast as "Dr. Phillips", scripted as a specialist whom "Dr. Glendon" privately consults after being afflicted with "lycanthrophobia"; this detail, however, was bypassed in the finished production (if indeed it was ever filmed at all), most likely because it would be totally against the established "solitary" character of "Glendon" to do so. At any rate, Barlow was "reassigned" the uncredited role of the caretaker Timothy.
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It was originally intended for Boris Karloff to play the Henry Hull character.
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The film didn't become the box office sensation that Universal were hoping for. The studio's next attempt at a werewolf movie would be much more successful.
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Contrary to popular belief, Henry Hull didn't strongly object to the original make-up designed by Jack Pierce. This was confirmed by the actor himself during an interview many years later.
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Originally, Boris Karloff and Bela Lugosi were scheduled to play the roles which went to Henry Hull and Warner Oland.
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Spoilers 

The trivia item below may give away important plot points.

The theatrical trailer on the Universal DVD contains a brief shot of Dr. Glendon in werewolf form slashing Dr. Yogami's face with his claws as they fight in the laboratory. This shot is not seen in the finished film, although we do get to see Dr. Yogami's slashed face at the end of the scene in the film.
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